Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont (2005)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: Bittersweet and endearing, this film about aging and unexpected friendship is a lovely vehicle for Joan Plowright.


Movie Info

The story centers around an elegant elderly lady who, after being recently widowed, moves from Scotland to London to be near to her 26 year old grandson, Desmond. When Desmond fails to return any of her several phone calls, or visit her at the resident hotel she is staying, fate brings her together with a young writer, Ludovic Meyer, after she has an accident outside his basement flat.

Rating: G
Genre: Drama, Comedy
Directed By:
Written By: Ruth Sacks
In Theaters:
On DVD: Dec 12, 2006
Runtime:
Cineville Inc. - Official Site

Cast


as Mrs. Palfrey

as Ludovic Meyer

as Mrs. Arbuthnot

as Gwendolyn

as Mr. Osborne

as Mrs. Post

as Mrs. Burton

as Mrs. De Salis

as Violet

as Elizabeth

as Elizabeth

as Willie De Salis

as The Manager

as Mrs. Meyer
Show More Cast

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Critic Reviews for Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont

All Critics (63) | Top Critics (25)

It's an altogether satisfying drama -- the sort of movie some people complain they don't make anymore.

Full Review… | June 2, 2006
Boston Globe
Top Critic

Like the woman herself, Mrs. Palfry gets to you.

Full Review… | May 19, 2006
San Francisco Chronicle
Top Critic

A small portrait of friendship and intergenerational connection, painted in delicate strokes and warm tones.

Full Review… | May 19, 2006
Detroit News
Top Critic

Plowright, who has made something of a specialty of breathing life into stereotypically written older women for the past 20 years, makes the most of a rare opportunity to play someone still open to the surprises the world can bring.

Full Review… | May 19, 2006
Detroit Free Press
Top Critic

Just as teenagers enjoy escapist movies, so do the elderly. They simply prefer a gentler pace. What is touching about Mrs. Palfrey is that she is allowed to be elderly, and not turned into a hip-hop granny.

Full Review… | May 5, 2006
Chicago Sun-Times
Top Critic

The whole thing feels programmed; the movie's sense of humor lacks understatement. So does the movie's sense of pathos.

Full Review… | May 4, 2006
Chicago Tribune
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont

joan plowright offers an excellent perfomance as usual

jjnxn
jay nixon

Super Reviewer

A beautiful, quiet little film that definitely tugs at the heartstrings. Joan Plowright and Rupert Friend were marvelous as the unlikely friends who find joy and inspiration in each other's company. This viewer nearly wrote it off early on due to the overacting of the supporting cast, who populate the hotel. But once the main story got underway, this became a gem. Very moving tale as these two lonely people found joy and inspiration in sharing experiences and conversations.

Mark Abell
Mark Abell

Super Reviewer

[font=Century Gothic]"Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont" is about the widowed Sarah Palfrey(Joan Plowright) who moves into the Claremont Hotel in London in order not to be a burden to her daughter and to have some independence in her life. The hotel is close to her grandson, Desmond, who works at the archives but after several weeks, he has not called her. While on the way back from mailing a letter, Sarah trips outside of the apartment of Ludovic Meyer(Rupert Friend), a writer and busker, who cares for her injuries. And she enlists him to pretend to be her grandson...[/font]
[font=Century Gothic][/font]
[font=Century Gothic]While maybe not appearing to be much at first, "Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont" is somehow touching without being maudlin. Overall, it is about the marginalization of the elderly in society, especially when their younger relatives do not make time for them.(In response, the movie gives a broader definition of family.) In addition, Sarah is more than normally out of touch with the time she is living in.(When somebody loses a person in their life, they lose a part of themselves.) Which is why she and Ludovic connect so well, since he feels so disconnected to his own time, using a manual typewriter, which I thought was a nice touch, along with being a very polite and considerate young man. [/font]

Harlequin68
Walter M.

Super Reviewer

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