No Good Deed (2014)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: Dull, derivative, and generally uninspired, No Good Deed wastes its stars' talents -- and the audience's time.


Movie Info

Terri (Taraji P. Henson), a devoted wife and mother of two, lives an ideal life that takes a dramatic turn when her home and children are threatened by Colin (Idris Elba), a charming stranger who smooth-talks his way into her house, claiming car trouble. The unexpected invitation leaves her and her family terrorized and fighting for survival. (C) Sony

Rating: PG-13 (for sequences of violence, menace, terror, and for language)
Genre: Mystery & Suspense
Directed By:
Written By: Aimee Lagos
In Theaters:
On DVD: Jan 6, 2015
Box Office: $52.5M
Runtime:
Sony/Screen Gems - Official Site

Cast


as Officer Jacobs

as Landlord

as McKinley

as Chairman

as Reporter
Show More Cast

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Critic Reviews for No Good Deed

All Critics (50) | Top Critics (13)

There should be something more exhilarating about the violent and hopeful epilogue finale than there is.

Full Review… | September 17, 2014
Grantland
Top Critic

It's a little dumb (OK, maybe more than a little), but "No Good Deed" is an otherwise brisk, efficient thriller that won't punish audiences who drop in.

Full Review… | September 14, 2014
Los Angeles Times
Top Critic

"No Good Deed" made some decent box office and didn't cost much to make. Perhaps there'll be a sequel. "Good Samaritan Goes Bad" or "Call Triple-A, Cause I Ain't Opening the Door."

Full Review… | January 6, 2015
Movie Chambers

No Good Deed is one of the least inspired and laziest films of 2014, featuring a complete lack of originality and a waste of talent from Idris Elba and Taraji P. Henson.

Full Review… | January 1, 2015
Examiner.com

There's a few table-turning twists that lend a veneer of final-girl sister-power ... but little else to provide big-screen distraction.

Full Review… | November 23, 2014
Observer [UK]

It is dismaying to see the brilliant Idris Elba and Sam Miller, his director from TV's Luther, working on low-grade exploitation fare like this.

Full Review… | November 21, 2014
Independent

Audience Reviews for No Good Deed

½

Here is a very standard home invasion thriller. Only difference is it's a black cast, and a good cast at that. Idris Elba stars as Colin, a man who breaks out of prison. Once out, he murders his ex fiancee, has a car crash, and then takes the home of Taraji P. Henson hostage. Elba and Henson are both great actors and do the best they can. But, when a movie is the same as every other movie in the genre, there isn't much they can do to make it truly stand out. But, having said that, it's not a bad movie, just nothing original. Even it's small twist towards the end is borderline predictable. Best thing about the movie is it's length, it's only 80 minutes long. It's a quick 80 minutes. But it's also a forgettable 80 minutes. Not a movie that will really stick with you. Just filler, to fill your mouth with some popcorn.

Everett Johnson
Everett Johnson

Super Reviewer

Truthfully, I likely never would have seen No Good Deed in the theater if it weren't for two events. It's not that it looked especially heinous, just ordinary and not worth rushing out to see. The first event was my father's newfound love of Idris Elba (Pacific Rim, Mandela) as an actor, an appreciation I too share for the charismatic leading man. The other event is a tad uncommon. Being part of a critics group, I regularly get e-mails from publicists about upcoming screenings. At the last minute, I received an e-mail informing me that an advanced screening was canceled, but what piqued my curiosity was the stated reason: there was a late twist/reveal that the studio did not want getting out. Really? What appeared on the surface like an ordinary home invasion thriller suddenly became a tad more intriguing, tempting my mind with possibilities. And so, with all of this achieved, I watched No Good Deed waiting to be surprised. My lack of surprise was the only real surprise, because just as I believed, this is your standard home invasion thriller that wastes the talents and time of just about everyone on screen.

Colin Evans (Elba) is a very bad man serving a five-year prison sentence for assault, though it's believed he's responsible for several missing women and former girlfriends. During his parole hearing he escapes and heads to his ex-girlfriend's (Kate del Castillo) home. Colin doesn't appreciate that she's moved on to another man, and so he strangles her to death. He then leaves and drives off the road, an accident as the result of a powerful thunderstorm rolling through Atlanta. He comes to the door of Terri (Taraji P. Henson), a mother and wife whose husband is away. He asks to use her phone and then take shelter from the storm. She lets him inside. Big mistake.

Doggedly formulaic, there is nothing about this story that separates it from the rest of the tired, dim-witted thrillers that prey upon fears of home invaders. If you removed the high-wattage stars from the film it would be completely at home on the quality-starved Lifetime Network, another poorly made suspense thriller about a bad man stalking a woman with subtle allusions to punishment for viewing the man as a sensual, dangerous opportunity. I was able to accurately guess every step of this story and I imagine you will have no problem with it as well (more on that "twist" later). How come there are no news stories about an escaped and violent convict? Colin severs the phone cords... but does nobody have cell phones in the neighborhood? In the opening credits, both Elba and Henson are listed as executive producers, which means that they attached themselves to this project because they wanted it to get made. They used their collective power to ensure this story would leap ahead of the thousands of other notable and compelling scripts in Hollywood (ahem). And the big question is why? I suppose there may be some fun from an acting standpoint to play such stock thriller roles as brooding boogeyman and bewildered ingénue. Except there's nothing to these one-note characters. The screenplay does the minimal amount of effort to establish them as victim and victimizer, but you'll never care about them or find them slightly interesting. Terri keeps making dumb decision after dumb decision; when you bash the bad guy in the head, you don't stop after one blow. She's a former prosecutor who worked in the homicide division, and yet she seems absentminded when interacting with mysterious strangers that appear in the dead of night at her doorstep. She's lacking all street smarts. There's nothing that sets apart Colin either (that name is a non-starter as far as striking fear). For a supposedly charismatic and brilliant narcissist, he doesn't do anything that smart.

I'll highlight the small handful of moments that stood out to me, which will include the ending and that presaged "twist." Henson is 44 years old and a very good-looking woman, though it's a tad odd when the movie contorts to place her in a T&A scenario. Colin, covered in fire hydrant discharge, insists she get in the shower with him so he can get clean. For the remainder of the sequence, the terrified Henson is shaking in her white tank top, her body alerting us to her cold. When was the last time a woman six years away from 50 was purposely squeezed into a moment of gratuitous titillation, let alone a non-white actress? Another part about Terri is that she's a mother, a fact that Colin routinely relies upon with veiled threats of harm to her little ones. The funny part about all of this is when she has to sneak around the house that Terri has to grab her 4-year-old with one arm and the baby carriage with another, creating an awkwardly comical image. And it happens again and again. She sets the kids down, then goes back to carry them out, and then repeats. It made me laugh every time because it's just so unwieldy. Another example of the botched screenwriting: Terri has a baby and at no point in the film does the conflict of keeping the baby quiet surface. She has to quiet the child or else Colin will find them. It's a natural setup with such a young baby. Instead the baby is completely silent for the entire movie, peacefully sleeping though lots of physical activity, screaming, gunshots, a thunderstorm, and tree branches smashing through windows. This baby is unreal. How could this never be utilized? Again, more wasted potential, whatever slight potential there was to start with.

But this brings us to the so-called twist, which I will obligingly refer to with spoilers but rest assured, if this is the working definition of twists nowawadays, we're all getting a little too carried away. When Colin takes Terri and her kids back to his dead ex-girlfriend's home, the recently murdered woman's phone rings. Who's on the other end? Shocker, it's Terri's husband, who has been having an affair with this same woman. And... that's it. That's the twist, which is really more of a plot reveal but nothing along the magnitude of a "Bruce Willis is dead" revelation. As it happened, I thought, "Okay, that can't be it, can it?" Oh, it was. What's even more frustrating is that No Good Deed doesn't build off this reveal. Colin was headed over to Terri's address to make her husband suffer, but then what? Afterwards, Terri runs around the house and eventually dispatches Colin, and the movie ends with her moving out on her own, essentially the least complicated and most boring ending it could formulate. My father had a far more morbid rewrite that I'll share with you, dear reader. His version would climax with the husband coming home and Colin casually murdering Terri and both of her young children, leaving bad hubby to forever suffer with guilt over the repercussions of his infidelity. While this ending would be controversial, it makes more sense in connecting the plot beats and at least stands on its own. At least it would be memorable.

No Good Deed isn't a horrendous movie. It's just dull from start to finish, never attempting to be anything beyond a mediocre thriller. Its complete lack of ambition is even more upsetting with the quality of actors who helped to get this film made. The direction is hackneyed, the visuals are poorly lit and clumsy, and the thrills are too generic and often stupid to be entertaining. The characters are dumb, the story is dumb, and the movie is dumb. Worst of all, it's boring, the ultimate sin for a thriller. Unless you're hard up for some precious Taraji P. Henson T&A (and no judgment, she's a very beautiful woman), there's no good reason to venture out and catch No Good Deed.

Nate's Grade: C-

Nate Z.
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

At the end of the day "No Good Deed" may only work to reinforce the of stereotype of the "angry black man", but due to a good hour of well-constructed, tension driven sequences, followed by a few chase sequences, I fail to see how anybody wouldn't find this experience entertaining on some B-movie level. At the very least, "No Good Deed" is far far FAR more entertaining than the latest Kevin Hart movie or the annual "Tyler Perry Presents: Black People Acting a Fool" production.

Read the rest of the review at: http://www.examiner.com/review/no-good-deed-a-black-version-of-a-white-thriller

Follow me on Twitter @moviesmarkus

Markus Emilio Robinson
Markus Robinson

Super Reviewer

No Good Deed Quotes

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