• R, 1 hr. 19 min.
  • Comedy
  • Directed By:
    Barry W. Blaustein
    In Theaters:
    Mar 25, 2011 Limited
    On DVD:
    Jul 19, 2011
  • IFC Films

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Peep World Reviews

Page 1 of 12
hunterjt13
hunterjt13

Super Reviewer

June 13, 2013
When an author writes an expose about his dysfunctional family, the annual birthday get-together erupts.
I liked the premise for this film; it's an opportunity to say something about art, authorship, and familial relationships. But instead of being a round character, at one point, the author has to fuck away a surgically induced hard-on. Each of the characters is given his/her cliched identity, a mold that amounts to a mere type. They're all boring people, and none of the situations is a particularly compelling, identifiable conflict. One brother is pursued by loan sharks, one goes to a peep house, and a sister doesn't like the eponymous novel -- boring, boringer, and boringest.
The worst part of the film is that all the lead-up amounts to a climactic scene that is anything but a climax. A bunch of people scream at each other. Ho hum.
Overall, this film could have been interesting if the scrapped almost everything in the script.
Spencer S

Super Reviewer

March 21, 2011
Quirk is my bread and butter. Almost always I side with these critically flawed comedies, because I like the misfit, the outcast, the central character having the mouth of a sailor when they're a ten year old blonde WASP or have an obsession with bees. What could have been a phenomenal, if not clinically brutal portrayal of a waylaid family of misfits comes off as a tepid interpretation of other films' Wikipedia pages. The cast, who all have embodied the kind of weird, disjointed characters that this film is made of, are given very little to use in order to further their storylines along. The entire film is based on the fact that one of four children writes a work of fiction based on his family's dysfunction. The fact that everyone hates each other right off the bat and tells each other on a regular basis could have made for some vicious attacks, a far more eccentric patriarch, and an interconnected obscurity with the rest of the world. There's no wit or sharp dialogue, nothing that comes off as edgy or the definition of fun. Besides that this has been done a thousand times before, and without true oddballs this is just another family drama. They're supposed to have another layer based on the tell-all book written by a brother, showing each sibling's problems and pitfalls and shining a light on the faults that are shocking and obscene; yet we go through the entire film and don't learn anything about them as people. The only thing I could relate to was Rainn Wilson's character. He still holds the reigns as a black sheep, and gives a truly heartbreaking speech near the end expressing the hurt of his brother's exploitation. Sadly his character, the best of the bunch, is severely underwritten. Hall has the most human of all the roles, and the actions he goes through to be in control are wrenching, but the dinner scene felt off track from what was previously shown of him. Instead of fleshing out the main character they used him to create that sucky ending. Oh, and the entire film has voice over narration by Lewis Black, who I'm guessing is only associated with this because it's comedy, and they briefly reveal the family is Jewish. Why? I suspect that's the quirkiest thing they could wrangle, which just makes me depressed. Watch it as a drama, and at least you'll understand some key aspect of family dysfunction, but you won't actually care at the end.
Sophie B

Super Reviewer

September 29, 2011
A well written film in terms of structure however there wasn't much going on. It was quite bland and predictable. A good cast seems wasted.
LWOODS04
LWOODS04

Super Reviewer

March 17, 2011
Cast: Michael C. Hall, Sarah Silverman, Rainn Wilson, Ben Schwartz, Judy Greer, Kate Mara, Taraji P. Henson, Ron Rifkin, Lesley Ann Warren

Director: Barry W. Blaustein

Summary: When four siblings gather to celebrate their father's 70th birthday, the proverbial you-know-what hits the fan because one of them has penned a novel populated by characters who strongly resemble his nearest and dearest. How will this dysfunctional family keep it together after everyone has seemingly been hung out to dry?

My Thoughts: "I am kinda known for loving these off-beat dysfunctional family flicks, but this one just didn't do it for me. Although I did laugh at a couple things, the film was just not funny. The script and story left something to be desired. Like more of it. It doesn't give you enough of what is so scandalously written in the book. It gives you bits and that isn't enough to keep you intrigued. The acting was good by most, but just not good enough to save the film."
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

July 3, 2013
In "Peep World," misery is nothing new for the Meyerwitz siblings. Jack's(Michael C. Hall) architecture business is foundering badly, just as he is expecting his first child with his wife Laura(Judy Greer). It has taken Joel(Rainn Wilson) eight tries to pass the bar exam and is so deep in the hole that he begs Jack for help on a regular basis. At least, Nathan(Ben Schwartz) is successful in writing a roman a clef about his family, thereby making the life of their sister Cheri(Sarah Silverman), an unemployed actress, even worse. That's all before the annual birthday dinner for their father Henry(Ron Rifkin), a wealthy property developer.

In its cringe inducing way, "Peep World" feels like a particularly misguided and crude pilot episode of which the best performances are from those on the periphery, Judy Greer, Guillermo Diaz, Kate Mara & Taraji P. Henson, who know enough not to force things. To be fair, there is one classic meta moment where fiction collides with reality.(Oh wait. Now, I get that other joke and instantly wish I hadn't.) Otherwise, the movie serves as an object lesson as to why one should not use Norman Mailer as a role model and never, ever go to a doctor one finds on Craigslist. Seriously, I don't know what the movie is trying to say, as all of the central characters can simply be written off as screw-ups, even Jack, who has his own secret. If they had been struggling to get anywhere, that would have been a definite improvement and would have grounded the movie in some kind of reality.
Laura C

Super Reviewer

November 1, 2010
Mildly amusing. Considering the cast I was highly disappointed
Christopher H

Super Reviewer

March 4, 2011
Peep World is great in the interest of seeing all of these great actors on screen, but as far as this film allowing these actors to reach their acting potential, it does not even scratch the surface. Similar to the effect of bringing in the best local chefs to cook you spaghetti-O's, Peep World squanders. Most of the characters come off generic and two-dimensional, while the situations they are involved in are sporadic and somewhat unrelated to the film as a whole, even leaving some of the main plot points up in the air by the end.
September 3, 2012
The idea of a guy writing a book about his ridiculously fucked up family is one that I can completely identify with, so this film appealed to me on a lot of levels. The ensemble cast is great, and there were numerous laugh out loud moments for me peppered throughout the film.

Well worth a look, give it a rental at the very least.

Recommended.
February 13, 2012
"Peep World" 10 Scale Rating: 5.5 (Average) ...

Not a bad idea and it was genuinely funny at times, but it seemed like several of the actors/actresses were trying too hard to out-do eachother.
January 3, 2012
This seemed like the most random casting of people, but I was impressed by all. A unique little movie, not bad at all.
Hamee
March 16, 2011
Another movie about a dysfunctional family. The story was weak, the ending was hilarious, and the cast was exceptional. In the end it was worth a watch, but it isn't spectacular.
gocolts20071
August 6, 2011
I loved this movie. I loved the cast and the plot. All you haters out there are braindead. This was a great comedy from start to finish. It was something refreshing and different that can be appreciated by someone who is sick of all the over the top bullshit comedy movies.
March 26, 2011
SUMMARY: Its the 70th birthday to the father of a pretty dysfunctional Jewish family. Every birthday they all celebrate at dinner. The difference between this dinner is that the youngest son wrote a book about how dysfunctional his family actually is.
POSITIVES: I loved the cast! We have my currently favorite actor, Michael C. Hall, playing the oldest bro Jack (his dysfunction is the reason why the book is called Peep World) . Rainn Wilson playing second eldest Joel. His dysfunction is being the family "screw-up". Cheri is the 3rd eldest and only sister. Her role is played by the hilarious Sarah Silverman. Cheri's dysfunction made her want to sue her brother for even writing the book. Which brings us to the final and youngest brother Nathan (the author of this book). Played by Ben Schwartz. His dysfunction is probably the funniest dysfunction out of the 4. Taraji P. Henson is now my favorite actress (Next to Helena Boham Carter). She ALWAYS acts with seriousness with a hint of comedy. Thats why I love her. So the honorable mention goes to her as well as Gullimero Diaz. The acting from all 6 actors i mentioned and Ron Rifkin (The father of these kids) was literally what made the movie so likeable. Also Lewis Black as The Narrator. Honestly, let Lewis Black be the narrator to any comedy. The dude is the definition of sarcastic comedy!
IMPROVEMENTS: The storyline was pretty dull. I loved the characters so much I wish I had the chance to get to know them better. A better storyline could've fulfilled my needs.
OVERALL: Who says the acting couldn't make the movie? They obviously haven't seen this movie. I'd give this movie 3 and a half books outta 5 (Rating: 3.5/5)
July 26, 2014
One line summary: The surfacing of truth is a painful process.

----------------------------

Henry Meyerwitz has four grown children: Jack, the architect; Joel, the lawyer who took 8 times to pass the bar exam; Cheri, the failed artist/actress; Nathan, the writer, who is seven years younger than Cheri. Henry is distant and imperious. Jack is tasked each year with paying for an expensive dinner in honor of Henry's birthday.

By Henry's seventieth birthday, family relations have gone from being tense and dysfunctional to harsh and confrontational. The main reason for this change is the wide success of Nathan's book Peep World, which is more than a bit too biographical for the comfort of Cheri, Joel, and Jack. To make things worse, Jack's business and revenue have shrunk, Joel's legal career is at a snail's pace, and Cheri's career is going nowhere. The topper is that Henry has a new girl friend Amy, who is the actress that plays Cheri in the film of Nathan's book.

In the hours leading up to the seventieth birthday dinner, the slow burns of the principal characters are exposed. At the dinner, they burst out, capped by Henry's speech returning all their fire.

Will the family gain some cohesion out of all this?

-----Scores-----

Cinematography: 8/10 Well shot for the most part; on Netflix it seemed to have some intervals of focus that was too soft.

Sound: 7/10 No particular problems, but I thought the sound could have been more of an asset to the film than it was.

Acting: 8/10 The large cast included several skilled actors doing fine work.

Screenplay: 5/10 The threads came together well at the end, but I thought the film would have been better without a narrator. Just to be clear, most of the laughs I got out of the film were from Lewis Black's expert delivery--as the narrator. The film was billed as a comedy; why should most of the humor come from the narrator's performance?
July 21, 2014
Basically, Peep Show was like a really long episode of Arrested Development. It was funny, but there really wasn't a story here...
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

July 3, 2013
In "Peep World," misery is nothing new for the Meyerwitz siblings. Jack's(Michael C. Hall) architecture business is foundering badly, just as he is expecting his first child with his wife Laura(Judy Greer). It has taken Joel(Rainn Wilson) eight tries to pass the bar exam and is so deep in the hole that he begs Jack for help on a regular basis. At least, Nathan(Ben Schwartz) is successful in writing a roman a clef about his family, thereby making the life of their sister Cheri(Sarah Silverman), an unemployed actress, even worse. That's all before the annual birthday dinner for their father Henry(Ron Rifkin), a wealthy property developer.

In its cringe inducing way, "Peep World" feels like a particularly misguided and crude pilot episode of which the best performances are from those on the periphery, Judy Greer, Guillermo Diaz, Kate Mara & Taraji P. Henson, who know enough not to force things. To be fair, there is one classic meta moment where fiction collides with reality.(Oh wait. Now, I get that other joke and instantly wish I hadn't.) Otherwise, the movie serves as an object lesson as to why one should not use Norman Mailer as a role model and never, ever go to a doctor one finds on Craigslist. Seriously, I don't know what the movie is trying to say, as all of the central characters can simply be written off as screw-ups, even Jack, who has his own secret. If they had been struggling to get anywhere, that would have been a definite improvement and would have grounded the movie in some kind of reality.
vic40186
May 1, 2013
It was a good idea, but the final product is not as funny or compelling as I would have hoped. The first hour is boring and the jokes don't work. Nathan, the main character is extremely unlikeable. You never really get to know what Peep World, the book, is really about. Michael C. Hall and Rainn Wilson are the ones who make the movie a little interesting, but their talents are wasted.
April 20, 2013
A movie that makes you wonder why anyone wanted to be in it and why you wasted your time watching it. Lots of funny actors, but the script is flat and dull. The comedic situations are weak and contrived. The movie runs a bit like a rejected Arrested Development script - family conflict among the rich and bitter but with no laughs and no dramatic resonance. If the music soundtrack is any indication, the filmmakers are aiming for whimsy but they never get the tone right. This is a pointless movie.
Luke W.
October 31, 2012
There's some great talent onscreen, but the script gives the nowhere to go, leaving the performers stranded with no story to back them up.
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