P.S. Reviews

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Time Out
November 17, 2011
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Todd McCarthy
Variety
June 21, 2011
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Elizabeth Kerr
Hollywood Reporter
October 25, 2010
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Ben Walters
Time Out
August 16, 2007
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Time Out
June 24, 2006
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Roger Moore
Orlando Sentinel
December 10, 2004
Linney directs her scenes from within them, holding our attention and keeping the focus on her confusion, her pain and her hope.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
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Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times
November 19, 2004
Both genders are programmed by eons of Darwinian genetic strategy, and so we believe them, and because Linney and Grace are sexy and play well together, the age gap is not a barrier so much as additional seasoning.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Michael Wilmington
Chicago Tribune
November 18, 2004
Despite an excellent supporting cast something in p.s. goes mushy and implausible.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Dallas Morning News
November 13, 2004
Full Review | Original Score: B
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Moira MacDonald
Seattle Times
November 12, 2004
Can't seem to make up its mind whether it's a romantic comedy, a drama or a psychological thriller and settles for being an odd -- and unbelievable -- hybrid of all three.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Richard Roeper
Ebert & Roeper
November 8, 2004
We have a talented director, and a wonderful cast -- but for me this is a near-miss.
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Ty Burr
Boston Globe
November 7, 2004
Contains more than its share of implausibilities and absurdities -- and let's not even imagine the reception the movie would get if the genders were reversed -- but if it's not Linney's finest role, it contains some of her nerviest work.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Rebecca Caldwell
Globe and Mail
November 5, 2004
The screenplay, adapted by both Kidd and Schulman, apparently leaves out much of the book's biting black humour.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Desson Thomson
Washington Post
November 5, 2004
The movie's extraordinary for its two main performances.
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Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post
November 5, 2004
Somehow, wondrous acting holds things together, particularly that of Linney and Grace.
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Geoff Pevere
Toronto Star
November 5, 2004
Linney and Grace play off one another beautifully, her reticent better judgment collapsing in equal proportion to his ironic detachment.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
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Carina Chocano
Los Angeles Times
October 22, 2004
Deliciously perverse and nutty throughout.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/5
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Mike Clark
USA Today
October 21, 2004
Linney remains a full-blooded character so memorable that she's worth watching -- even in a less-than-memorable movie.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Andrew Sarris
New York Observer
October 21, 2004
What a string of contrived coincidences.
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Ella Taylor
L.A. Weekly
October 21, 2004
This sappy stuff gets better direction by Kidd (who made the far superior Roger Dodger) than it deserves.
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Carla Meyer
San Francisco Chronicle
October 21, 2004
Goes disappointingly soft despite two dynamite lead performances.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Peter Rainer
New York Magazine/Vulture
October 19, 2004
It's a depressing sign of these Botoxed times that we're not meant to question the fact that the ravishing Laura Linney, playing a 39-year-old admissions officer in Columbia's fine-arts department, is over the hill.
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Anthony Lane
New Yorker
October 19, 2004
Kidd nudges his fragile story along at a beguiling pace.
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Peter Travers
Rolling Stone
October 15, 2004
Start the Oscar buzz now for the dependably superb Laura Linney, who brings beauty and a tough core of intelligence and wit to the role of New Yorker Louise Harrington, an admissions officer at Columbia's graduate school of fine arts.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Lisa Rose
Newark Star-Ledger
October 15, 2004
A movie that is wonderfully idiosyncratic, yet frustratingly misguided on occasion.
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Jack Mathews
New York Daily News
October 15, 2004
I haven't read the novel, so I can't say whether the author was more successful at making Louise's obsession plausible. It's certainly not believable in the movie.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Lou Lumenick
New York Post
October 15, 2004
Flawless work by the two actors can't quite save this mushy, chick-lit fantasy.
| Original Score: 2/4
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Gene Seymour
Newsday
October 15, 2004
The movie can't find its center, but Linney nails hers. She alone makes this worth a night out of your life.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Manohla Dargis
New York Times
October 14, 2004
Directed by Dylan Kidd, who showed some filmmaking promise a few years ago with Roger Dodger, P.S. is would-be romance etched in acid and loathing.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
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Rex Reed
New York Observer
October 14, 2004
Too many questions go unanswered in P.S., too many issues left unexplored. But Laura Linney's rueful awakening from middle-aged slumber and Topher Grace's balancing act between boyish lust and grownup integrity are irresistible.
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James Berardinelli
ReelViews
October 14, 2004
The result is an intriguing and satisfying romance that may hold some appeal even for those who normally do not like films about affairs of the heart.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Lisa Schwarzbaum
Entertainment Weekly
October 13, 2004
The movie implodes, with each actor less vivid than he or she ought to be and each character less connected to the others than necessary for such an arbitrary plot.
Full Review | Original Score: C
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Michael Atkinson
Village Voice
October 12, 2004
Kidd's movie staggers around as if its own story was some bad brown acid it had foolishly ingested.
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Kirk Honeycutt
Hollywood Reporter
September 5, 2004
Linney plays a woman whose problems in life irritate rather than intrigue you, and the story pivots around an implausible, even surreal coincidence that undoubtedly worked better in the source material, Helen Schulman's novel, than in the film.