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Retreat Reviews

Page 1 of 13
Cynthia S

Super Reviewer

March 5, 2012
A perfect example of a decent psychological thriller. .....I see so many bad reviews, but I found this rather good. This surely wasn't a plot that has been done over, and over. The actors were very good (Cillian is one of my faves). I think that the ending made a lot of people mad. I, personally, thought that it was an appropriate ending. It sure answered any questions that I might have had by that point.
Lewis C

Super Reviewer

May 11, 2012
I had pretty high expectations for Retreat because:

A. I'm a big fan of both Thandie Newton and Cillian Murphy.

and...

B. I like thrillers in general, and it's been a while since I've seen a good one.

And does it live up to those expectations? Not particularly. It's certainly a tense movie, with a menacing stranger showing up at the remote island vacation cottage of a couple, bringing with him frightening tales of a global pandemic. They mustn't leave and they must seal themselves away inside the cottage to avoid the certain death that outside contact and infection brings... according to him. But, is he telling the truth? Is the threat really the world outside, or the man in their home?

There's a twist or turn near the end that keeps Retreat from being strictly as predictable as my description might have lead you to believe, but whether that makes the story any better is up for debate. Personally, I found it to be somewhat underwhelming once it was all revealed.

Retreat does keep you guessing about what to believe, to a certain extent, but I can't say that I "enjoyed" watching the movie. The characters are all flaws and bad decisions, with no real reason to invest in them and hope they survive whatever threat, be it viral or human, that may endanger them.

The acting is nothing special, thanks to a pretty pedestrian script that lacks any semblance of nuance. The tragedy that brings the couple to the cottage has no real relevance to the story, which makes it nothing more than pointless backstory. Their history is brought up in careful detail, only to never lead anywhere. Murphy's character is written to be such a weak and passive man that it borders on caricature and Newton's has two emotions, unhappy and afraid (though she still manages to be absolutely beautiful). Jamie Bell goes overboard on the menace and danger, when some ambiguity would have served both the character and story much better.

This was definitely a flawed experience for me. I didn't dislike the movie, and as I said, it can be quite tense at times, but it just seemed off in several ways. The word "underwhelming" comes to mind.
Al S

Super Reviewer

February 18, 2012
An unforgettable and powerful edge of your seat thriller that your pulse-pounding and your heart-racing all the way to the end. It`s loaded with gripping suspense and unstoppable tension. It`s utterly well-crafted and incrediably performend by its wonderful cast. A riveting tour de force of a thriller. A real knockout. Cillian Murphey and Thandie Newton are outstanding. Jamie Bell is electrifying, he gives a strong, confident and and terrifying performance, he`s a real show stealer. Murphey, Bell and Newton give great strength to their characters and just helps makes this movie work more. A little bit of Straw Dogs meets alot of Dead Calm. A well-polished character study with a tense claustrophobic feel that works out well. A mind-blowing ride that`s twisty, frequently thrilling and tremendously entertaining movie. Director, Carol Tibbetts crafts a brilliant and remarkable film.
Roy G

Super Reviewer

January 11, 2012
This is a neat, well-crafted three-hander, making good use of its location; it really is a meaty role for Bell, who lets rip in what might be his most eye-catching part since Billy Elliot.
MANUGINO
MANUGINO

Super Reviewer

November 18, 2011
A world away from everything you know.

Not bad! The story was kinda intriguing and well played. The cinematography and sound were impressive. The acting could have been better but it was good enough. You never know what's gonna happen which keeps you guessing till the end which was shocking and disturbing which I surely loved.

In a last-ditch attempt to save their failing marriage after the stillbirth of their first child, Kate, a journalist, and Martin, an architect, escape London for a retreat to the beautiful, yet remote and unpopulated Blackholme Island, which is off the west coast of Scotland. Fairweather Cottage is a place where they once shared a romantic holiday and the island holds fond memories of happier times. Kate and Martin arrive by boat, it's autumn and the rocky barren moors are blown by freezing winds and the before they've even settled in, the generator and CB radio communication start to fail. Their relationship is already fragile and anxieties are pushed higher when they lose all contact with the mainland and after a heavy storm, an injured man is washed up on the shore. Dressed in military fatigues and carrying a gun, the mysterious stranger regains consciousness and identifies himself as a British soldier called Private Jack Corman and he soon reveals that he carries a deadly message - an airborne virus is sweeping Europe and all their lives are under threat unless they take drastic action. He insists that the only way to avoid the fatal disease is to seal themselves in the cottage.
LorenzoVonMatterhorn
LorenzoVonMatterhorn

Super Reviewer

November 14, 2011
"No neighbors. No help. No escape."

Kate and Martin escape from personal tragedy to an Island Retreat. Cut off from the outside world, their attempts to recover are shattered when a Man is washed ashore, with news of airborne killer disease that is sweeping through Europe.

REVIEW
Overly dramatic struggling for a Polanski vibe, and this movie's failing perhaps shows just how gifted Polanski can be in traveling that fine line between drama, and melodrama. Thandie Newton is one of my favorite actors but her character was so unlikable in this I had difficulty giving her the love she deserves, and although she did have to be a jerk for the plot to work the balance was tipped too far over, and even I found it hard to empathize with her. We never really got to understand her's and Cillian Murphy's back story and I certainly don't mind not being spoon feed every detail but the vagueness of it all meant we just didn't really care that much about them. All of that has to come down to one role I think, and that has to be the director. Maybe he wasn't ready for his first movie, took on too many roles, bit off more than he could chew, at the end of the day this movie fails and it fails when it could have been a little master piece. There really was something more than we got with the missteps of this movie. It's a shame really. I hope he can do better on the next one.
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

February 2, 2013
"Retreat" starts with Martin(Cillian Murphy) and Kate(Thandie Newton) traveling to a remote island where they hope to relive happier times of when they were last there. Things do not go well at first, either emotionally or involving the generator, a remnant left over from the Industrial Revolution, leading them to call in Doug(Jimmy Yuill), the caretaker. And then Jack(Jamie Bell) shows up on their doorstep, all bloody and bruised, before wanting to have a quiet word with Martin.

The phrase 'when bad things happen to good actors' usually applies to bloated Hollywood fare, but it can also equally apply to much more modest productions like the would be thriller "Retreat." Overall, after a neat set-up, the movie suffers from a fatal case of indecision, giving its talented cast little to do, except for one scene where a character is glad he played a lot of Operation as a kid. Otherwise they sit around and shout at each other while waiting for the drawn out climax to happen. Whereas I can understand Jack being something of an enigma since he is the key to the movie, the same could not be said about Martin and Kate. She is a writer and they suffered an unspeakable tragedy of some sort and that is pretty much it, which makes it that much harder to care about what happens to them.
themoviewaffler.com
themoviewaffler.com

Super Reviewer

October 24, 2011
Murphy and Newton play a couple who head to a remote island to try and save their ailing marriage. When they find Bell washed up on the shore he tells them he escaped the mainland, fleeing from an airborne virus that is spreading throughout the world, and proceeds to barricade them inside their cottage.
What we have here is really just "Dead Calm" in a cottage. Bell is excellent and there are some nice twists along the way which end with a homage to "Night Of The Living Dead" but don't expect anything you haven't seen before.
Cameron W. Johnson
Cameron W. Johnson

Super Reviewer

April 19, 2014
"'Retreat, retreat, retreat', cries my heart!" Man, I'm old, so maybe I should have bit my tongue and promoted 21st century music by referencing the song by The Rakes, because it's release is closer to this film's, and it's also startlingly British. Mind you, for post-punk revival, it's still about as cheesy as the 1950s pop song I ended up referencing, and make no mistake, folks, this isn't quite as lighthearted as "Couples Retreat", which you shouldn't mistake it for, even though it can't be too much less exciting than this film. Well, I mean, I don't know how exciting you can make a thriller that actually proposes retreating in its title, although I might just be saying that either because you can't look at that title and help thinking of the French, who you can't think of without thinking about dull films. It doesn't exactly help that "28 Weeks Later" stood to be more exciting, leaving you with a little concern that this, "28 Months Later", or whatever, isn't bound to be too thrilling, especially considering that it doesn't even involve a zombie-esque virus pandemic. Jokes aside, looking at "Peacock" as the sister... or brother dressed as a sister film to "Breakfast on Pluto", - another film about transvestism - a now this film about a few people trying to escape from a viral pandemic, it would appear that the early 2010s are seeing Cillian Murphy looking to, if you will, "retreat" to some of his classic roles. I guess I'm okay with that, because roles like these usually beget quality performances from Murphy, as well as pretty decent films, but this is more "28 Weeks Later" than "28 Days Later", what with its setbacks.

Really, I've joked and joked about how this is yet another pandemic film featuring Cillian Murphy, but this doesn't really follow the formula of something like "28 Days Later", instead taking from formulas of island thriller by the fistful, being almost too conventional to keep a degree of unpredictability alive, and therefore at least familiar to the point of being kind of bland. To make matters worse, some of the tropes taken are heavy-handed dramatics, which are limited in quantity, and even severity, but nonetheless present, defusing much of the genuineness of this thriller which ostensibly thrives on the believability of its characters' situations. Quite frankly, this film isn't exactly doing a great job in a lot of ways as a character study, because the film's histrionics could perhaps be easier to buy into if Janice Hallett's and Carl Tibbetts' script put more work into selling the characters, whose lack of immediate development and somewhat sparse gradual exposition can be gotten used to after a while, but never prevent a sense of distance between you and the characters. As if that's not aggravating enough, the film still finds some time to drag its feet with excess that, while at its worst during a meandering, yet still underdeveloped first act, constantly struggles to give this narrative something to work with, until it begins to all but lose focus. Well, I don't reckon you ever lose your grip on what this film is trying to say, it's just that the film is aimless in its deliverance of such a message, combining underdevelopment, dragging and a hint of a sense of predictability in order to meander in a fashion that is more reflective of the lack of material in this story, rather than the wealth of it. Running exactly a mere 90 minutes, this film still drags its feet, and what that tells you is that this story was never to have much depth to flesh out, being tense in its minimalism, but minimalist nevertheless, with only so much potential that is still done something of an injustice by familiar, histrionic, undercooked and draggy storytelling. When it's all said and done, the film is kind of forgettable, yet it doesn't squander your time, having its share of misguided elements, and just as many sharp elements.

Atmosphere plays a big part in driving this thriller, and Ilan Eshkeri's score plays a big part in driving the atmosphere, being very prominent throughout the film, and carrying a bite to its more subdued elements that sustains musical and atmospheric intrigue, with slightly more colorful compositions whose gloomy beauty haunts. The visual style of the film also immerses, as Chris Seager's tasteful, sparse lighting plays are both handsome and complimentary to a sense of isolation, but not without the help of bleak island locations that are broad enough to give you a feel for the environment, but tight enough to further reinforce a sense of claustrophobia, which, as you can imagine, drives a film of this type. Minimalist and not even unique as a meditation more on the intensity on shaky human interactions in an isolated setting, rather than the dramatic depth, this story doesn't carry much potential, which still finds itself betrayed at times, and yet, intrigue stands pretty firm in this film's concept, and when it comes to the execution, Janice Hallett and Carl Tibbetts pen a script with some memorable, if underdeveloped characters and conflicts, with some nifty moments of sudden inspiration. The film is formulaic, but I don't know if it's technically all that predictable, for there is a solid twist that is well worth waiting for through all the meandering, a challenge settled by some genuine inspiration to the interpretation of an interesting idea. The direction also deserves recognition for crafting the most effective moments of this film, if not the fair degree of entertainment value that stands throughout the final product, feeding off of Tibbetts' directorial plays on chilling score work and disconcerting visuals that establish consistent tension, highlighted by some weighty intensity, kind of like the performances. Intensity is just as well-encompassed within the three central performance that, of course, receive about as much attention as anything in this character-driven thriller, and do about as much as anything in bringing this thriller to life, relatively speaking that is, for although dramatic material is limited, the fear and harshness projected by Cillian Murphy, Thandie Newton and Jamie Bell sell the gradual sense of dehumanization which this study on dangerous human interactions in a claustrophobic setting ought to have. The storytelling doesn't do as consistently solid of a job at projecting the depths of this thriller as the performers, but when heights in storytelling inspiration meet the consistent inspiration in acting, there's enough drive in this thriller to compel and hold your investment, even if it doesn't hold your memory as firmly.

When it is, in fact, time to retreat, a lack of originality and an inconsistency in uniqueness, expository depth and pacing to the telling of a minimalist story make for a somewhat forgettable thriller, kept alive by chilling scoring and visuals, heights in writing and direction, and strong performances by Cillian Murphy, Thandie Newton and Jamie Bell, until Carl Tibbetts' "Retreat" is left standing as a decent and often pretty effective, if underwhelming bottle thriller.

2.5/5 - Fair
Christopher H

Super Reviewer

October 6, 2011
Retreat plays on expectations, or rather what one expects to be actually taking place outside the walls of the house that the characters are in. On one side there is a strange and dangerous looking man (played wonderfully by Jamie Bell) who tells an unbelievable story and with his odd mannerisms and sometimes violent demeanor, you are left constantly questioning his state-of-mind. Meanwhile, the couple enduring this madman (Cillian Murphy and Thandie Newton) all while getting over their conflicted relationship. Unlike most lower budget thrillers that lose steam the further into plot that they delve, Retreat picks up steam even into the conclusion of the film and is easily one of the most underrated films of 2012 thus far.
David S

Super Reviewer

September 2, 2012
An intense three-hander home invasion movie that takes place on an isolated island 'Retreat' could almost be a play as a majority of the action takes place in the cottage there. The film uses a remarkably similar plot to 'Dead Calm' but unlike that (superior) movie you're never sure whether Bell's intruder is a complete nutter or genuine in his motives. The fact that the film doesn't resolve this until right at the very end works well and Bell is very good here. Murphy does alright in his role but I just found Newton a bit annoying and that didn't help my enjoyment of the whole thing. However the whole thing works quite well and there's a nice string soundtrack throughout. Just don't go into in expecting anything amazing.
Francisco  G.
Francisco G.

Super Reviewer

January 19, 2012
Doesn't offer anything new to the genre but doesn't insult it either. Could've had some better fleshed-out characters, tension between them and probably the overdose of twists on the last 20minutes of the flick is too much. Still entertaining while it lasts and keeps you guessing till the end.
December 30, 2013
Thrilling, yet incredibly bleak. Despite an interesting concept and some good performances on the part of the cast, Retreat is a thriller that starts out dreary, and ends the same way. Plus, the reveal at the end of the film treats the audience like they hadn't been paying attention the whole time. There's not much fun to be had here.

The Good: Jamie Bell - I was surprised by how much I enjoyed Jamie Bell's performance in this film. I don't know if I've ever seen him in much before, but he did a spectacular job as the possible villain/possible hero in the film. You were never sure you could trust him, but one thing was sure, you never wanted to be alone with him. He had a sleazy and creepy quality about him that made you feel incredibly uncomfortable.

Thrilling - The one thing the film does really well is creating moments of dramatic tension. Whether it's a scene of dialogue between two characters or whether it's when Murphy's character tries to remove a gun from Bell's unconscious soldier, director Carl Tibbets knows how to keep the tension tight.

The Bad: The tone - As I've already stated, this film is overwhelmingly bleak. Even in the first act of the film, there's nothing to love about these characters, no scene that gives you a reason to want to fight for these characters. You get the feeling they're going to fall apart with or without the catalyst introduced in the second act. Even the lighting in the film is incredibly bleak, and the color pallette is pretty muted. For a thriller to be truly affecting there should be some moment of hope, something worth fighting for.

The twist - When the reveal (or should I say many reveals) at the end of the film occurs, my mind began poking so many holes in what had previously happened, that I felt like the creators didn't even consider that I might be carefully watching the film. None of it makes a whole lot of sense, and just feels like the director is just trying to throw you off guard.

The Smugly (Movie snob nitpicks): Sexual assualt - Why does every "end of the world" type thriller have to have some fear of impending sexual assault. It doesn't make much sense within the context of the film, especially at the end of the film in hindsight. It just struck me wrong.
April 11, 2012
I wouldn't recommend 'Retreat'.

A journalist wife and an architect husband, recovering from a personal tragedy, resort to the comfort of a lonely cottage, on a deserted Island to rekindle their lost love. An injured man in a military uniform with a gun on his front pocket land up on their porch.

Though restricted to a standoff within a small cottage in a deserted island among these three people, the crux of "Retreat" deals with a bio hazardous outbreak, military intervention and whether a vaccination for a deadly airborne disease truly exists or not. We have to admit that this bit is new.
Yet "Retreat" looks more play acting and too good to be true in its 90 minute running time.
atlantris25
March 31, 2012
I really enjoyed this film. I love when a movie is unpredictable and you're trying to figure it out the entire time. I also love Thandie Newton as an actress. Great film!
Hamee
December 16, 2011
The best part of this movie is never knowing when Jack is telling the truth. By the end you definitely don't want to believe him, but things get much worse right before the credits roll. I think that the cast made this movie watchable; others wouldn't have been able to pull of these roles. This movie has an interesting story, but the characters are the reason to stay through the slow building of the plot to see how they end up.
March 25, 2012
This movie has so much promise, but unfortunately doesn't live up to most of it. It starts out pretty exciting and mysterious, and ends in the most predictable and depressing way. I really like Cillian Murphy, so he made it worth sitting through, but I definitely wouldn't have any desire to see it again.
February 22, 2012
This movie was okay. One thing you learn from this movie is Don't take a stranger in to your house .
November 26, 2011
I still do not know what i think of this movie, there was great acting, and there was horrible acting as well. very interesting story line though with an epic conclusion.
Cameron W. Johnson
Cameron W. Johnson

Super Reviewer

April 19, 2014
"'Retreat, retreat, retreat', cries my heart!" Man, I'm old, so maybe I should have bit my tongue and promoted 21st century music by referencing the song by The Rakes, because it's release is closer to this film's, and it's also startlingly British. Mind you, for post-punk revival, it's still about as cheesy as the 1950s pop song I ended up referencing, and make no mistake, folks, this isn't quite as lighthearted as "Couples Retreat", which you shouldn't mistake it for, even though it can't be too much less exciting than this film. Well, I mean, I don't know how exciting you can make a thriller that actually proposes retreating in its title, although I might just be saying that either because you can't look at that title and help thinking of the French, who you can't think of without thinking about dull films. It doesn't exactly help that "28 Weeks Later" stood to be more exciting, leaving you with a little concern that this, "28 Months Later", or whatever, isn't bound to be too thrilling, especially considering that it doesn't even involve a zombie-esque virus pandemic. Jokes aside, looking at "Peacock" as the sister... or brother dressed as a sister film to "Breakfast on Pluto", - another film about transvestism - a now this film about a few people trying to escape from a viral pandemic, it would appear that the early 2010s are seeing Cillian Murphy looking to, if you will, "retreat" to some of his classic roles. I guess I'm okay with that, because roles like these usually beget quality performances from Murphy, as well as pretty decent films, but this is more "28 Weeks Later" than "28 Days Later", what with its setbacks.

Really, I've joked and joked about how this is yet another pandemic film featuring Cillian Murphy, but this doesn't really follow the formula of something like "28 Days Later", instead taking from formulas of island thriller by the fistful, being almost too conventional to keep a degree of unpredictability alive, and therefore at least familiar to the point of being kind of bland. To make matters worse, some of the tropes taken are heavy-handed dramatics, which are limited in quantity, and even severity, but nonetheless present, defusing much of the genuineness of this thriller which ostensibly thrives on the believability of its characters' situations. Quite frankly, this film isn't exactly doing a great job in a lot of ways as a character study, because the film's histrionics could perhaps be easier to buy into if Janice Hallett's and Carl Tibbetts' script put more work into selling the characters, whose lack of immediate development and somewhat sparse gradual exposition can be gotten used to after a while, but never prevent a sense of distance between you and the characters. As if that's not aggravating enough, the film still finds some time to drag its feet with excess that, while at its worst during a meandering, yet still underdeveloped first act, constantly struggles to give this narrative something to work with, until it begins to all but lose focus. Well, I don't reckon you ever lose your grip on what this film is trying to say, it's just that the film is aimless in its deliverance of such a message, combining underdevelopment, dragging and a hint of a sense of predictability in order to meander in a fashion that is more reflective of the lack of material in this story, rather than the wealth of it. Running exactly a mere 90 minutes, this film still drags its feet, and what that tells you is that this story was never to have much depth to flesh out, being tense in its minimalism, but minimalist nevertheless, with only so much potential that is still done something of an injustice by familiar, histrionic, undercooked and draggy storytelling. When it's all said and done, the film is kind of forgettable, yet it doesn't squander your time, having its share of misguided elements, and just as many sharp elements.

Atmosphere plays a big part in driving this thriller, and Ilan Eshkeri's score plays a big part in driving the atmosphere, being very prominent throughout the film, and carrying a bite to its more subdued elements that sustains musical and atmospheric intrigue, with slightly more colorful compositions whose gloomy beauty haunts. The visual style of the film also immerses, as Chris Seager's tasteful, sparse lighting plays are both handsome and complimentary to a sense of isolation, but not without the help of bleak island locations that are broad enough to give you a feel for the environment, but tight enough to further reinforce a sense of claustrophobia, which, as you can imagine, drives a film of this type. Minimalist and not even unique as a meditation more on the intensity on shaky human interactions in an isolated setting, rather than the dramatic depth, this story doesn't carry much potential, which still finds itself betrayed at times, and yet, intrigue stands pretty firm in this film's concept, and when it comes to the execution, Janice Hallett and Carl Tibbetts pen a script with some memorable, if underdeveloped characters and conflicts, with some nifty moments of sudden inspiration. The film is formulaic, but I don't know if it's technically all that predictable, for there is a solid twist that is well worth waiting for through all the meandering, a challenge settled by some genuine inspiration to the interpretation of an interesting idea. The direction also deserves recognition for crafting the most effective moments of this film, if not the fair degree of entertainment value that stands throughout the final product, feeding off of Tibbetts' directorial plays on chilling score work and disconcerting visuals that establish consistent tension, highlighted by some weighty intensity, kind of like the performances. Intensity is just as well-encompassed within the three central performance that, of course, receive about as much attention as anything in this character-driven thriller, and do about as much as anything in bringing this thriller to life, relatively speaking that is, for although dramatic material is limited, the fear and harshness projected by Cillian Murphy, Thandie Newton and Jamie Bell sell the gradual sense of dehumanization which this study on dangerous human interactions in a claustrophobic setting ought to have. The storytelling doesn't do as consistently solid of a job at projecting the depths of this thriller as the performers, but when heights in storytelling inspiration meet the consistent inspiration in acting, there's enough drive in this thriller to compel and hold your investment, even if it doesn't hold your memory as firmly.

When it is, in fact, time to retreat, a lack of originality and an inconsistency in uniqueness, expository depth and pacing to the telling of a minimalist story make for a somewhat forgettable thriller, kept alive by chilling scoring and visuals, heights in writing and direction, and strong performances by Cillian Murphy, Thandie Newton and Jamie Bell, until Carl Tibbetts' "Retreat" is left standing as a decent and often pretty effective, if underwhelming bottle thriller.

2.5/5 - Fair
Page 1 of 13
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