Trouble the Water (2008)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: This incredible documentary displays the tragedy and mismanagement of Katrina along with the heroism of strangers and survivors.


Movie Info

"Trouble the Water" takes you inside Hurricane Katrina in a way never before seen on screen. The film opens the day before the storm makes landfall--just blocks away from the French Quarter but far from the New Orleans that most tourists knew. Kimberly Rivers Roberts, an aspiring rap artist, is turning her new video camera on herself and her Ninth Ward neighbors trapped in the city. "It's going to be a day to remember," Kim declares. As the hurricane begins to rage and the floodwaters fill their … More

Rating: Unrated
Genre: Documentary, Special Interest
Directed By: ,
In Theaters:
On DVD: Aug 25, 2009
Box Office: $0.1M
Runtime:
Zeitgeist Films - Official Site

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Critic Reviews for Trouble the Water

All Critics (74) | Top Critics (28)

'God's gonna trouble the water,' goes the chorus from the African-American spiritual that gives Trouble the Water its title, but no deity is to blame for the tide of bureaucratic bungling and inhumanity the movie reveals.

Full Review… | February 13, 2009
Toronto Star
Top Critic

The person at the centre emerges as a force of nature unto herself. Meet, and prepare to be inspired by, Kimberly Rivers Roberts.

Full Review… | February 12, 2009
Globe and Mail
Top Critic

Essential, startling and distressing insight into what it was like to be in the eye of the Katrina storm if you were a poor, black resident of the Ninth Ward of New Orleans on Monday August 29 2005.

Full Review… | December 5, 2008
Time Out
Top Critic

You can't help wanting -- and maybe needing -- to read into her indomitable spiritedness something like a reason for hope. For her, for other Katrina survivors, for all of us.

Full Review… | October 31, 2008
Houston Chronicle
Top Critic

A documentary that changed direction, like a weather front, in the midst of being made.

Full Review… | August 15, 2011
East Bay Express

Timely, relevant, and touching documentary that needs to be seen.

Full Review… | July 27, 2011
EmanuelLevy.Com

Audience Reviews for Trouble the Water

Kimberly Rivers Roberts and her family survive Hurricane Katrina and the aftermath.
The film takes several pot shots at the Bush Administration and the local governments in their handling of the disaster, and it sets up its primary subject as a hero, a survivor in the face of unimaginable hardship. Politically, I agree with the film's disdain, and although it took me a while to like Roberts, by the end of the film, I admired her even if I don't know how long we could sustain a conversation in real life.
Overall, it's biased, but Trouble the Water is ultimately an important film.

hunterjt13
Jim Hunter

Super Reviewer

While this is a bit too (understandably) biased to be labeled a true documentary...it is still quite a powerful look at one of the most horrific events in recent American history.

What makes this version of a "Katrina Story" so powerful, is that it is a story that is shot from "the inside". And by "the inside" I'm not only refering to the gut wrenching footage that was shot on home video pre, during and post Katrina. I also use that term to describe the view it provides into the heart and soul of the poverty stricken 9th ward, where most of the damage took place.

While this is presented as the story of one woman, I think that the story is (sadly) global. The difference is that most stories involving similar circumstance, don't inspire as much hope.

The heroine of this story is a survivor. Someone who has been dealt one difficult hand after another, but who has been blessed with just enough spiritual fortitude to allow her to persevere.

It's hard to look into her eyes and her heart (not to mention those of her friends, family and neighbors) and not be touched by their spirit. They have (for the most part) all been relegated to this life, mostly due to lack of education and/or opportunity. And then disenfranchised and demoralized by society.

As a (pre Katrina) resident of New Orleans for several years I must point out that much of what is said in this film about the failure of city and national government in regards to American citizens that (for whatever reason) have fallen into poverty, can be applied (to some extent) to every major cities across America. This is not simply a New Orleans story, it just happens to take place there.

Katrina served as a wake up call to America (and the world). Ripping the tattered bandage off of this festering wound (poverty) on the soul of America and exposing the fact that our governments incompetence goes far beyond foriegn affairs.

As difficult as it is to accept, what is important now is that we remember, what was revealed to us when the storm passed. And more importantly, that we make sure that the people who we elect to represent us...also remember.

RCCLBC
Robert C

Super Reviewer

"Trouble the Water" is a documentary about Kim and Scott Roberts who lacking transportation decided to ride out Hurricane Katrina in their home in New Orleans, stocking up on supplies and filming home movies before, during and after. Luckily, they made it not only out of their home alive after the levees broke, first from their attic, then to a neighbor's home on higher ground and later 220 miles away to Alexandria, La. The movie speaks not only to their harrowing journey of survival but also to the unpreparedness and intransigence of the authorities who were seemingly more interested in protecting property than saving lives. More help came from families and friends but only the government can work on the huge scale required.(There are many invocations of religion which speaks to the general helplessness of the situation.) Such laissez-faire attitudes are also the indirect cause of the oil spill that is currently causing so much damage in the gulf coast. The documentary squanders its excellent point of view by focusing more on the familiar larger story, than the more intimate, smaller story, as it gets off a ridiculously cheap shot towards the finish. Sadly, the movie also eventually runs out of steam, not having a clear idea when to end, as the story is still ongoing.

Harlequin68
Walter M.

Super Reviewer

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