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Who Framed Roger Rabbit Reviews

Page 1 of 683
Everett J

Super Reviewer

July 1, 2013
*****
Last week I was picking up some DVDs and figured I would look at the shelf of Blu rays and see what they had. Low and behold I saw this sitting there and immediately thought "I must show this to Grant!" It's been years since I've seen this(I saw it in the theater and we had it on VHS growing up), and I'm happy to say this movie hasn't aged a bit. Especially on Blu-Ray, it still looks fantastic and it's as funny and wacky as ever. For those don't know about this movie, go get a copy at the video store or watch on Netflix(it just got added the other day) as soon as possible. Grant laughed a few times, but he's 2 and doesn't yet understand most of it. Actually, this movie has a lot more curse words than I remember, so just beware before showing to kids. I'm no father of the year, but I still think kids should see this because it's awesome(I was 5 when it came out and I turned out alright). I've had a bunch of debates on who's hotter, Jessica Rabbit or Smurfette(yeah my coworkers and I are sick),and Jessica takes it by a long shot after re-watching this. Also interesting note, this is the only movie that Bugs Bunny and Mickey Mouse share a scene together. Go back and re-watch this for a laugh and a reminder of how awesome animation used to be and can still be.
CloudStrife84
CloudStrife84

Super Reviewer

April 8, 2007
This movie is truly one of its kind. It's not really a kids movie, nor can it be classified as intended for adults only. It lands somewhere in between, in the blurry greyzone, where everyone may enjoy it on some level, no matter your age. The only other film I can think of, that goes along the same lines (mixing live-action with cartoons), is Space Jam, altough it's far from as brilliant and memorable as Who Framed Roger Rabbit is. The story is quite wonderful, the effects very good for their time, and it's an 80's classic that endures several re-watches (I reckon this is the 4th time I see it). Simply put: Hollywood magic at its finest hour.
Graham J

Super Reviewer

December 11, 2011
This is movie magic. So colorful and beautiful.
FiLmCrAzY
FiLmCrAzY

Super Reviewer

September 9, 2007
I do very much enjoy this movie, you've got all your favourite cartoon characters all in one movie with new characters as well, its a highly enjoyable and funny movie thats great for the whole family.
I love movies where you have real life characters and also cartoons all in one movie! I love Bob Hoskins in this he's great with his typical londoner personna!
In my opinion this is the prime example of amazing cartoon drawings and animation! This is how cartoons should look and be drawn and then animated!
Fantastic movie thats a timeless classic and will forever be enjoyed and loved regardless of what year it is!
Zach B

Super Reviewer

March 11, 2012
There was a time period in my life where I was obsessed with this film. When I first saw this film, I was around the age of seven and I was entranced with the look of this film. Even till today, I have yet to see a more lovingly crafted film that mixes handdrawn animation and real actors together as brilliantly as this film did. Then I saw this film about ten years later at the age of seventeen and what I saw is what I consider one of the best films of the 1980's.
But why is this film is good? What makes it timeless? It would have to be the character of Roger Rabbit. If one was to think about it, Roger is the personified idea of a 1940's actor at the time: crazy, desperate for work, protective over those he loves, and a total air head that is beyond lovable. From the time he drinks alcohol in this film to the scene where he is near death, the character of Roger moves this story. Now, here is the funny thing: he is the character that this film is based around, but he is only the supporting character.
The real star is Eddie Valiant. This is one disturbed, distraught-ed individual who has a boiling hatred for all things related to toons due to an unfortunate murder that took his brother. With this in mind, Eddie takes the center stage as he unfolds this film and we experience this crazy world that he lives in as he rediscovers all he has missed during his era of hatocracy.
Robert Zemeckis is one of the most prolific directors we have now, directing films ranging from Beowulf to Back To The Future to Forest Gump to even The Polar Express. He pushes the boundaries of what one can do with special effects like what Spielberg did with E.T. and Kubrick did with 2002. With this film, I consider this his all time masterpiece, beating any of the films I have mentioned and the famous Cast Away. Why this film is his masterpiece is due to how lovingly he pays attention to the detail with the cartoons. The term 'life like' does not apply here. These toons have shadows, does damage to humans, and actually become humans in their own right. What Zemeckis did with this film was open the doors for films like Space Jam and Rocky & Bullwinkle years later.
While this film is a technical achievement, it is also historic in the sense that this film did something that was unheard of: Disney and Warner Brothers would team up their money children into one film and have them work together. There has always been a debate over which is better: Mickey Mouse or Bugs Bunney. This film destroys all debates by showing that both universes of cartoons are equal and coexists with all of us regardless if we want to admit it or not.
Mainly dealing with how Hollywood relies too much on these characters to make money. Sometimes to the extent that they use them as minorities and never pays them any real respect, seeing them as completely disposable. I know what you are all thinking: He is acting as if these cartoons are really living! He has finally cracked! This is my defense: I have not gone crazy. What has happened is that this film shows that, at the time, no one appreciated the hard work that people who makes these creations go through. This film is complete tribute to the works of Disney and Warner Brothers. It is a pity that I have yet to see anything that resembles another collaboration.
In the end, this film is a complete work of art from beginning to end. From the hilarious opening segment till the heartwarming ending, this is a film that still has yet to be surpassed by any other film that deals with animation I have seen. It constantly grows as animation gives way to CGI and people start to forget the magic and love of hand-drawn animation. This wonderful film is one of those films that much be watched, then watched again to gain a complete appreciation for the work that went into this.
Directors Cat
Directors Cat

Super Reviewer

December 2, 2011
Who Framed Roger Rabbit has always set the benchmark for live action animation mixing. Its colourful and its charming and the acting is well done and it boasts an original storyline. This is an example of a film made when all sorts of talent actually gathered to show that entertainemnt for the family is just as important as any other target audience. It's got great music and a very classic feel to it.
Phil H

Super Reviewer

August 22, 2007
Zemekis genius here, saw this when I was about 11 and it blew me away, it still does. Lloyd and Hoskins are great but we all know this film is about the effects and the toons. The cartoons look amazing and despite standing out against the live action actors like bad bluescreen it somehow still looks good. Its amazing the skill involved to make real objects move, timed to perfection, so they blend with the toons, to be frank the making of the film is almost better and more interesting than the actual film.

The story grabs you and isn't as basic as you might suspect whilst the film is also historic as its the only time Warner ('Bugs' etc..) and Disney ('Dumbo' etc..) cartoons feature on the same screen. Fun, wacky, quite macabre and risky here and there..kids be warned everything is not rosey in this world of toons. Stand out movie which is extremely clever and well made.
Daniel L

Super Reviewer

October 8, 2011
Probably one of my favorite movies as a kid. Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a thrilling and hilarious noir film that blends live action with incredible animation.
MANUGINO
MANUGINO

Super Reviewer

February 13, 2009
It's the story of a man, a woman, and a rabbit in a triangle of trouble.

Saw it again! Great movie! I saw it when I was a kid and now it's pretty the same, enjoyed it alot. This movie also won 3 oscars which was pretty cool too. Love the story and it's characters!

It's the story of a cartoon character named Roger Rabbit who exists along side of real humans. Eventually, it is revealed that Marvin Acme, the owner of the Acme Company and of Toontown, has been murdered! But all fingers point to Roger Rabbit, a Toon star at Maroon Cartoons. But unfortunately the only person who can prove Roger's innocence is Toon hating Eddie Valiant, a washed-up, alcoholic private detective who is reluctantly forced into helping when Roger hides in his apartment. It's up to Eddie to clear Roger's name and find the real evildoer before the villainous, power-hungry Judge Doom goes on a mission to bring Roger to justice!
Alexander D

Super Reviewer

July 16, 2011
Great
TheDudeLebowski65
TheDudeLebowski65

Super Reviewer

July 7, 2011
Many films have been groundbreaking in the use of computer animation. In 1982 it was Tron, in 1988 it was Who Framed Roger Rabbit. This is a remarkable film utilizing some amazing special effects that combines toons with the real world. Director Robert Zemeckis taking a short break from the Back To The Future films and directs this impressive film. I remember seeing this film as a child, and I remember Christopher Lloyd scaring the hell outta me. Watching it recently brought back memories, and I can understand why I felt that way about Lloyd's character. Who Framed Roger Rabbit is an incredible film that is pure fun for the entire family. The special effects are incredible, and Robert Zemeckies has accomplished yet another film classic with this film. Who Framed Roger Rabbit is really a funny film that has something for everyone. But like I said, the special here are a sight to see. Especially considering that this was made in the 80's. As far as the acting is concerned, well everr cast member delivers a good job at delivering a great performance. I especially enjoyed Kathleen Turner as the voice of Jessica Rabbit and of course Christopher Lloyd as Judge Doom. The film has a sharp brand of humour that at times is oriented towards adults. This is definitely a must see film not to be missed by film lovers. A awesome comedy for people of all ages.
DreamExtractor
DreamExtractor

Super Reviewer

March 24, 2011
I just love watching this movie, its a masterpiece. The technology used in this movie is hard to do even in todays movies. Hoskins is very rare to be in a movie but this might be his greatest role ever. The plot is great with a mix of comedy, mystery, and noire. The animated characters look great and have amazing voice acting. This movie just always has something going on and if youre lucky youll see some of yourfavorite animated characters of the old days.
AJ V

Super Reviewer

September 6, 2010
A technically and visually awesome movie, as well as a great and funny story. This movie is a lot of fun, and I highly recommend it.
Jacob E

Super Reviewer

February 1, 2011
You know, this movie surprised me. It really did, and it surprised me as much as it surprised people who saw it in 1988. Mixing cartoons and live actors had been considered suicidal for years, it was impossible to do well. Let me take this time very briefly to point out that the 1980's represents the final decade in which filmmakers really REALLY had to work hard to maker their stuff look good, and some have managed to survive the test of time as a result (Blade Runner, The Thing). But Who Framed Roger Rabbit is in this category as well, the movie still looks stunning. The interaction between the actors and the cartoons is incredibly realistic, the way light and shadows hit the cartoons and the way they bump into objects is very well scripted, and the animation was 100% hand-drawn. I'm amazed by how well the effects hold up, but there are plenty of movies with great special effects, but what counts is if the story is good. Thankfully, Roger Rabbit nails this by mixing wacky Tex Avery style characters with a cop-noir story. This very bizarre mixture results in some very memorable moments, including the only time in film history that Bugs Bunny and Mickey Mouse are in the same movie and same shot at the same time. I'll give you time to re-read the previous sentence if needed so you can process the thought of 2 of the biggest rivals in animation showing up together in the greatest cameo of all time. I won't spoil too many of the set pieces, but you won't forget them anytime soon. Let me wrap this up and say that this is essential viewing for anyone of any age (adults might enjoy this more than kids, risque jokes for the win) and especially if you love old school animation characters, you might spend the majority of your time watching for all the characters that show up. An excellent movie, one of the easiest 5-stars I've ever had to give.

NOTE: Can someone get Disney to release this on Blu-Ray? If they even announced that, I would pre-order it in a heart beat.
michael e.
michael e.

Super Reviewer

December 3, 2010
an amazing mix of adult humor, animation, camera work, character development, great suspense, great characters, and great acting. The most innovative film ive ever seen in the cartoon department
Spencer S

Super Reviewer

December 9, 2008
Brought back interest in the golden age of cartoons and supposedly led to the Disney Renaissance. Roger Rabbit was made for adults and children, and delivers on both fronts. Bob Hoskins seems to have been born tough and controlled, and his loony companion is right in between annoying and comic genius. Not forgetting the perfect baddie Christopher Lloyd, who was not only the perfect choice in casting, but is a kid's worst nightmare.
cosmo313
cosmo313

Super Reviewer

June 9, 2006
At the time this first came out, it was a true revelation. Never before had such a technically innovative and imaginative film been released. Blendning live action with animation (and bringing Disnet together with Warner Bros.), Who Framed Roger Rabbit is an outstanding allegorical mystery film.

As a kid I didn't pick up on the references, but now, the throwbacks to film noir and hard boiled detective stories are awesome. Kids can enjoy this movie because it's a lot of fun, and there are lots of animated characters, but this is also a film for adults too, as there is a lot of depth, character development, and mature themes and issues on display.

Everything looks absolutely gorgeous, and the blending of live action and animation is seamless. The writing is very smart and sharp, and well observed, the performances (live action and voice) are fantastic, and the direction is great.

It's obvious I basically love this movie, even though I haven't actually watched ir for some time. While I think that Zemeckis is still a good director, this was back when he was in top form, and his movies treated visual and effects wizardly equally with story and characters. Not that his more recent movies are devoid of substance, but they seem more shallow. I wish Hollywood would still make movies like this (both in this hybrid style, and with this level of ingenuity and creativity in general).
Richard C

Super Reviewer

July 29, 2010
B
Movie Monster
Movie Monster

Super Reviewer

July 4, 2010
I remember seeing this on VHS when I was little and loving it! Since I was a toddler, I didn't see the movie as a murder mystery and took it literally as a comedy. The scene where they kill the animated shoe with the DIP still haunts me to this day. Not to mention Judge Doom's death. IT'S ONE OF THE BEST DEATHS IN HISTORY!!!

Funny, cool, scary, and entertaining everytime!
FilmFanatik
FilmFanatik

Super Reviewer

January 12, 2007
One of Zemeckis' best and most innovative films.
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