Joshua RothkopfMovie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Joshua Rothkopf

Joshua Rothkopf
Joshua Rothkopf's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/5 75% Split (2017) There's a tiny shiver of something in the final few seconds that doesn't exactly change what we've watched so much as say, "I'm still M. Night Shyamalan, and I'm still crazy!" He's become his own twist ending. ‐ Time Out
Posted Jan 18, 2017
4/5 92% The Red Turtle (La tortue rouge) (2017) Dudok de Wit modulates our emotions in sophisticated ways, first accessing the awe of The Black Stallion, then straight-up guilt and, finally, an evolution that can't be explained by anything other than hope. ‐ Time Out
Posted Jan 18, 2017
3/5 75% Reset (Relève: Histoire d'une création) (2017) Reset could use a lot more discipline itself; it feels too flabby for the company it keeps. ‐ Time Out
Posted Jan 10, 2017
1/5 17% Underworld: Blood Wars (2017) Whatever's vibrating on your phone is more interesting than what's onscreen. ‐ Time Out
Posted Jan 6, 2017
3/5 95% Fences (2016) Washington's performance -- as big as it gets -- is all wrong for the movies, where even a self-aggrandizing character like Troy Maxson, a former Negro Leagues star ballplayer turned '50s Pittsburgh garbageman, needs to be scaled back to feel realistic. ‐ Time Out
Posted Dec 20, 2016
3/5 92% Hidden Figures (2017) The film aims for the stars but might have gone stratospheric if it cooled its jets ever so slightly. ‐ Time Out
Posted Dec 20, 2016
5/5 84% Silence (2017) Scorsese has hit the rare heights of Ingmar Bergman and Carl Theodor Dreyer, artists who found in religion a battleground that often left the strongest in tatters. It's a movie desperately needed at a moment when bluster must yield to self-reflection. ‐ Time Out
Posted Dec 10, 2016
5/5 96% I Am Not Your Negro (2017) Bringing a sense of gravitas to Baldwin's words is Samuel L. Jackson, whose decidedly nonfurious narration is his finest performance to date, bar none. ‐ Time Out
Posted Dec 8, 2016
5/5 76% The Eyes of My Mother (2016) It already feels, unwittingly, like a timely expression of backwardness straight from the heartland, tinged with revenge, sex and saintly suffering. If you can stomach the fear, go. Confident hands created this film. Its nightmare lingers for weeks. ‐ Time Out
Posted Nov 23, 2016
2/5 23% Bad Santa 2 (2016) Bad Santa 2 has to make do with director Mark Waters (Mean Girls), who is both more sentimental and more accepting of broad, panicky comedy. ‐ Time Out
Posted Nov 23, 2016
4/5 91% Always Shine (2016) Every casual exchange becomes a lunge for dominance, and the movie keeps you flinching. ‐ Time Out
Posted Nov 23, 2016
3/5 54% Rules Don't Apply (2016) Like everything this star-director has done, the film is deceptively smart. It's just a little too late to the game. ‐ Time Out
Posted Nov 23, 2016
5/5 96% Manchester by the Sea (2016) An emotional powerhouse with the weave of great literature. ‐ Time Out
Posted Nov 17, 2016
5/5 95% The Love Witch (2016) It's cloaked in a retro wardrobe and soundtrack (much of the music, by Italy's Ennio Morricone, is sourced from '60s thrillers) but loaded with irony and a fluid sense of identity. ‐ Time Out
Posted Nov 17, 2016
4/5 48% Almost Christmas (2016) The movie takes a few calamitous turns at its climax, dangerously approaching broad slapstick and villainizing a character we've come to love. But mainly, it's a fun and boisterous countdown to the big meal. ‐ Time Out
Posted Nov 15, 2016
3/5 94% Gimme Danger (2016) An important addition to our understanding of early '70s anarchy. ‐ Time Out
Posted Nov 14, 2016
2/5 44% Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk (2016) This strategy is wrong at every level. It renders the images nauseating, it constantly rejects you emotionally from the performances, and it's showy and distracting. Worst, it turns the real issue of post-traumatic stress into a technological gimmick. ‐ Time Out
Posted Nov 8, 2016
3/5 23% American Pastoral (2016) It's a remarkably committed effort that takes a few seriously misguided turns along the way, even as its actors lunge at psychological depth with every scene. ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 22, 2016
3/5 96% Train to Busan (Bu-san-haeng) (2016) Less effectively, the movie has some rather obvious social comeuppances in mind and you'll groan at the contrivances. Just wait a few minutes and you'll get to the next action sequence, in which Yeon is more confident. ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 22, 2016
3/5 55% Michael Moore In TrumpLand (2016) Moore walks right up to the edge of the stage and asks people why they hate Hillary. It's a ballsy, direct confrontation, one that brings out the best of Moore's blue-collar, guy-from-Flint-Michigan straightforwardness. ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 22, 2016
1/5 19% Keeping Up With The Joneses (2016) Structured with the kind of obviousness that makes you outwit the screenwriter and then hate movies in general, Greg Mottola's painfully generic suburban spy comedy wastes everybody's time, onscreen and off. ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 22, 2016
2/5 86% Christine (2016) Hall plays Chubbuck like a slow-motion train wreck. She gives an almost comic performance, alternating between twitchy Kristen Wiig-like dismissals and a furious thousand-yard stare that burns a hole through the lens. ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 12, 2016
4/5 89% 20th Century Women (2017) When 20th Century Women concerns itself with the utterly human question of personal satisfaction, it's huggable: the kind of movie you wish more directors had the courage to grab for. ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 12, 2016
1/5 51% The Accountant (2016) "What is this?" shrieks this film's villain (John Lithgow, bringing on the full, hammy Lithgowness) at an unfortunate moment in the laughably bad The Accountant . You'll know exactly how he feels. ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 12, 2016
4/5 53% Mascots (2016) Sometimes Guest's films stray into snobbery against flyover country, but Mascots mostly avoids that. It hides its toxic warfare under a furry guise. ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 12, 2016
3/5 72% The Birth of a Nation (2016) What you will find is a film that toggles between impressive fury and a kind of made-for-TV blandness that does Nat Turner's 1831 uprising -- still controversial -- no favors. ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 5, 2016
5/5 92% Voyage of Time: The IMAX Experience (2016) It's this briefer, 40-minute Brad edit in IMAX, loaded with scientific conjecture and cosmic gorgeousness, that stands a chance of becoming a modern-day classic -- and not just for stoners who relate to the phrase "every particle blazing." ‐ Time Out
Posted Oct 5, 2016
3/5 32% Masterminds (2016) Hess dives deeply into the ass crack of suburban North Carolina, finding lowbrow caricature courtesy his two wonderfully shameless lead actors, Zach Galifianakis and Kristen Wiig. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 30, 2016
3/5 63% Storks (2016) Storks isn't terrible...it's just too generic for a marketplace that's often a site of genius. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 23, 2016
5/5 89% Jackie (2016) Eclipsing her work in Black Swan, Portman flutters like a sail in a brisk wind. She is scattered, tense, wrecked and compellingly defiant in the face of those who would have her act a certain way. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 14, 2016
5/5 98% Moonlight (2016) Moonlight takes the pain of growing up and turns it into hardened scars and private caresses. This film is, without a doubt, the reason we go to the movies: to understand, to come closer, to ache -- hopefully with another. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 11, 2016
2/5 61% Snowden (2016) There was always the chance of Snowden's story coming off as an underpowered Bourne movie, but Stone somehow finds ways to make it extra boring. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 10, 2016
4/5 63% The Magnificent Seven (2016) A vehicle for wall-to-wall action, and an unambiguously fond farewell to the Obama years. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 10, 2016
4/5 92% Demon (2016) Nailing a tricky sense of physical anarchy (as well as some far subtler domestic tensions), Marcin Wrona's Polish import is an eerie, extraordinarily poised piece of horror. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 6, 2016
3/5 82% Author: The JT LeRoy Story (2016) Never is Albert confronted with the ramifications of her falsely hijacking a fatal disease, a sexual identity or a social strata that was alien to her. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 6, 2016
3/5 88% Other People (2016) Raw, messy and unkempt (as a domestic cancer drama should be), Saturday Night Live writer Chris Kelly's feature debut is also a woe-is-me gay rom-com, a showdown between siblings and-at its best-an out-and-proud minimusical. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 6, 2016
3/5 85% Sully (2016) Even as recently as American Sniper, Eastwood has done a much better job than this of shading in the grays of what constitutes heroism, both during and after the fact. Sully is so square, it's a wonder it even gets airborne. ‐ Time Out
Posted Sep 3, 2016
4/5 81% Kate Plays Christine (2016) A documentary Vertigo, Robert Greene's re-creation of a woman who fell to her inner demons -- something of a ghost story -- feels dangerous. It pokes the bear, then slaps it. ‐ Time Out
Posted Aug 25, 2016
2/5 45% Hands of Stone (2016) The movie needs más -- mucho más. As Durán, Edgar Ramírez accesses the playboy arrogance he channeled for Carlos, but he's stranded by a timid script that doesn't give him enough private moments. ‐ Time Out
Posted Aug 25, 2016
3/5 87% Don't Breathe (2016) Alvarez quiets his movie down to a game of cat and mouse, a luxury in a climate in which horror is all about maximum volume. ‐ Time Out
Posted Aug 25, 2016
2/5 25% Ben-Hur (2016) Just because you're rolling in the chariot doesn't make you Charlton Heston. That's a lesson this weightless, instantly disposable remake of the 1959 sword-and-sandal Oscar winner learns the hard way. ‐ Time Out
Posted Aug 19, 2016
4/5 93% Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (2016) We want the rambling Werner Herzog to follow his muse into strange corners -- let lesser documentary filmmakers stick to virtues like coherence. ‐ Time Out
Posted Aug 18, 2016
4/5 89% Morris from America (2016) This is a supremely gentle film, one that doesn't require a catastrophe to capture a momentous sense of growing up. ‐ Time Out
Posted Aug 18, 2016
2/5 60% War Dogs (2016) War Dogs is insufficient with these two characters (or maybe it's these two actors), who are neither hapless and schmucky enough to sustain laughs nor venal enough to get us rooting against them. ‐ Time Out
Posted Aug 16, 2016
3/5 83% Sausage Party (2016) Some of the gags are more cringy than others -- like Craig Robinson's cracka-hating box of grits -- but don't call it empty calories. ‐ Time Out
Posted Aug 12, 2016
4/5 89% Miss Sharon Jones! (2016) Kopple, maker of 1976's still-shocking labor documentary Harlan County U.S.A., is incapable of producing a typical music doc (even if this one has the arc for it). ‐ Time Out
Posted Jul 20, 2016
3/5 99% Don't Think Twice (2016) Birbiglia continues to mine a scene he knows well, and even though he doesn't strike you as a natural-born filmmaker (some of these scenes are as flatly lensed as the SNL sketches being spoofed), he's evolving as a confrontational dramatist. ‐ Time Out
Posted Jul 20, 2016
3/5 76% Lights Out (2016) Once the film runs out of unusual lighting schemes to exploit (violet-hued goth black lighting, random blasts of car headlights, etc.), it loses power faster than a millennial with a long-overdue electric bill. But that one shadow lady is enough. ‐ Time Out
Posted Jul 20, 2016
3/5 69% The Infiltrator (2016) Composer Chris Hajian breaks out the percolating Jan Hammer synthesizers, and the '80s decadence wafts offscreen like a stink. ‐ Time Out
Posted Jul 14, 2016
2/5 33% Equals (2016) Equals could be Kristen Stewart's least persuasive performance to date -- and remember, she's played a soldier at Guantanamo and a girl who dates a vampire. ‐ Time Out
Posted Jul 14, 2016