Hofshat Kaits (My Father My Lord) (2008)

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: This beautiful Israeli film is both a moving family drama and a potent examination of the trials of faith.

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Movie Info

Israeli director David Volach's chamber drama My Father, My Lord (aka Hofshat Kaits, 2006) provides an intense character study of a rabbi in an Orthodox neighborhood, whose letter-of-the-law application of Talmudic tenets takes an exacting toll on his life. He must thus grapple with the conflicting demands of his belief system and his familial obligations to his wife and child.
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Art House & International , Drama
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:

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Cast

Assi Dayan
as Rabbi Abraham Eidelmann
Ilan Griff
as Menahem Eidelmann
Sharon Hacohen
as Esther Eidelmann
Elan Griff
as Menachem
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Critic Reviews for Hofshat Kaits (My Father My Lord)

All Critics (37) | Top Critics (17)

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | November 17, 2011
Time Out
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | September 7, 2011
Entertainment Weekly
Top Critic

You could say this film is at once a secular fable on a religious dilemma and an almost religious parable about an all-too-human tragedy.

Full Review… | January 4, 2010
Time Out
Top Critic

An impressive debut by 37-year-old Israeli writer-director David Volach, "My Father My Lord" squeezes more humanity into 72 minutes than most Hollywood movies can muster in two hours or more.

Full Review… | October 3, 2008
Seattle Times
Top Critic

Volach doesn't waste a word or action in his spare, finely crafted screenplay.

Full Review… | August 1, 2008
Chicago Reader
Top Critic

[Director David] Volach makes every moment count by holding tight close-ups on the faces of his extraordinarily tender, expressive cast, framing them with an elegant beauty.

July 24, 2008
Chicago Tribune
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Hofshat Kaits (My Father My Lord)

Though the film's pacing feels weighed down at moments (and part of that might even be the fact that the film is completely in Hebrew, and therefore not as accessible as a standard American film), the movie ends up being a good one because the concepts at the heart of the film are unique and fascinating as a perspective on devoted ideology. The films tale of a man so impassioned in his devotion to religion, to the point that it obscures his passion for his own child to ultimately tragic depths, seems like a bold statement for one to make, but undoubtedly many have personal tales to relate that detail the same type of scenario. The film is a very insightful view on faith, and also discusses one of the opinions I have always held true as a highly spiritual person: those who are devout and faithful should not be frightened or timid to question aspects of their faith, as it can lead to greater understanding of your faith. A challenging film, but rewarding if given a fair chance.

Michael Clayton
Michael Clayton

[B]THIS WAS ONE OF THE WORST MOVIES WE (6 PEOPLE) SAW......... IT WAS WORSE THAN SITTING SHIVA.........[/B] IT WAS CONTRIVED AND OBVIOUS.... :down:

bene silvershein
bene silvershein

[font=Century Gothic]In "My Father My Lord," Menachem(Ilan Griff) is your typical child with an innate curiosity at the world around him while attending Torah school and looking forward to a visit to the Dead Sea. He is doted on by his mother, Esther(Sharon Hacohen Bar), while his father, Abraham(Assi Dayan), a rabbi and Talmudic scholar, who while busy with his studies, does not mind that his son is present as he falls asleep from the boredom. Abraham's beliefs have evolved over time into inflexible dogma which rules over every moment of his family's lives. And that is the kind of behavior that the movie is out to critique which I have no problem with.(Along the same lines, some people should not have kids, no matter how encouraged they may be to do so.) It is with the approach that is definitely shaky because there are some things that should never be wished on anybody just to make a point. In this case, it does not make much difference whether it comes from god or the director, because they are the same person as far as these characters are concerned. This might explain why he is so found of complicated overhead shots which unnecessarily cloud the climax of the film.[/font]

Walter M.
Walter M.

Super Reviewer

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