The Invisible Man

2020

The Invisible Man

Critics Consensus

Smart, well-acted, and above all scary, The Invisible Man proves that sometimes, the classic source material for a fresh reboot can be hiding in plain sight.

92%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 142

86%

Audience Score

Verified Ratings: 22
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Movie Info

Trapped in a violent, controlling relationship with a wealthy and brilliant scientist, Cecilia Kass (Moss) escapes in the dead of night and disappears into hiding, aided by her sister (Harriet Dyer, NBC's The InBetween), their childhood friend (Aldis Hodge, Straight Outta Compton) and his teenage daughter (Storm Reid, HBO's Euphoria). But when Cecilia's abusive ex (Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Netflix's The Haunting of Hill House) commits suicide and leaves her a generous portion of his vast fortune, Cecilia suspects his death was a hoax. As a series of eerie coincidences turns lethal, threatening the lives of those she loves, Cecilia's sanity begins to unravel as she desperately tries to prove that she is being hunted by someone nobody can see.

Cast

Elisabeth Moss
as Cecilia Kass
Aldis Hodge
as James Lanier
Storm Reid
as Sydney Lanier
Harriet Dyer
as Emily Kass
Oliver Jackson-Cohen
as Adrian Griffin
Benedict Hardie
as Marc (Architect)
Sam Smith
as Detective Reckley
Anthony Brandon Wong
as Accident Victim
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News & Interviews for The Invisible Man

Critic Reviews for The Invisible Man

All Critics (142) | Top Critics (32) | Fresh (130) | Rotten (12)

  • Whannell has succeeded by deemphasizing blockbuster effects and engaging with an old monster in a new way. He's created an invisible man for 2020 while still embracing the foundational terrors of 1933.

    February 27, 2020 | Full Review…

    Scott Tobias

    NPR
    Top Critic
  • Leigh Whannell's film is ingenious, frequently scary, and a Grand Guignol tour de force for Ms. Moss. It's also purposeful to a fault as a fable for the #MeToo era.

    February 27, 2020 | Full Review…
  • It's never fair to judge a movie based on what you want it to be. But when that movie sets an explicit goal and then fails to meet it - heck, doesn't even try to meet it - it's open season.

    February 27, 2020 | Rating: 1.5/4 | Full Review…
  • The reason The Invisible Man holds you in an emotional vise grip for so much of its running time is thanks almost entirely to Moss.

    February 27, 2020 | Rating: 3/4 | Full Review…

    Oliver Jones

    Observer
    Top Critic
  • Conjures lots of creepiness, thanks foremost to star Elisabeth Moss, but this is one of those movies that works better the less time one spends sweating the details.

    February 27, 2020 | Full Review…

    Brian Lowry

    CNN.com
    Top Critic
  • Directed by Leigh Whannell, whose screenplays jump-started the "Saw" and "Insidious" horror series, it's a sly, twisty little chiller, not ashamed of its B-movie bona fides and better for it.

    February 27, 2020 | Rating: 3/4 | Full Review…

    Ty Burr

    Boston Globe
    Top Critic

Audience Reviews for The Invisible Man

  • 5h ago
    Does everyone remember the Dark Universe, the attempted relaunch of classic Universal monsters that were going to be played by the likes of Javier Bardem, Angelina Jolie, and Johnny Depp? It's okay if you do not, though the stars got paid regardless. It was all going to be kicked off with Tom Cruise in 2017's The Mummy, and one under-performing movie later the entire cinematic universe was discarded by spooked studio bosses. But IP will only stay dormant for so long, and so we have a new attempt to relaunch the same horror figures that first terrified audiences almost 90 years ago. Writer/director Leigh Whannell has a long career in genre filmmaking, having started the Saw and Insidious franchises with James Wan, but it was 2018's bloody action indie Upgrade that really showed what he could do as a director. He was tapped by powerhouse studio Blumhouse to breathe life into those dusty old monsters, going the route of lower budget genre horror rather than blockbuster action spectacles. The Invisible Man is an immediately gripping movie, excellent in its craft, and proof Whannell should be given the remaining monsters to shepherd. Cecilia (Elisabeth Moss) has recently run away from her long-time abusive boyfriend, Adrian (House on Haunted Hill's Oliver Jackson-Cohen). Just as she's taking comfort in friends and her sister, Adrian takes his own life and lists Cecilia as the sole beneficiary, but there's a catch. She must undergo a psych evaluation and be cleared. Cecilia is ready to move on with her life and start over but she can't shake the feeling that Adrian might not be dead after all and is still watching her. Whannell has grown as a genre filmmaker and has delivered a scary movie that is confident, crafty, and jarringly effective. From the intense opening sequence, I was generally riveted from start to finish. The shots that Whannell chooses to communicate geography and distance so effectively allow the audience to simmer in the tension of the moment. Whannell's visual compositions are clean and smart. Another sign how well he builds an atmosphere of unease is that I began to dread the empty space in the camera frame. Could there be an invisible man hiding somewhere? Could some small visual movement tip off the presence of the attacker? Much like A Quiet Place taught an audience to fear the faintest of noise, The Invisible Man teaches its audience to fear open space. It places the viewer in the same anxious, paranoid headspace as Cecilia. It's also a very economical decision for a horror filmmaker, training your audience to fear what they don't see. And there is a lot more in a movie that is not seen. The suspense set pieces are so well drawn and varied yet they all follow that old school horror model of establishing the setting, the rules, and just winding things up and letting them go, squeezing the moment for maximum anxiety. It's reminiscent of the finer points of another old school horror homage, The Conjuring franchise. At its most elemental, horror is the dread of what will happen next to characters we care about, and The Invisible Man succeeds wildly by placing an engaging character in shrewdly designed traps. I jumped even during its jump scares and that happens so rarely for me. The jump scares don't feel cheap either, which is even more impressive. They're clever little visual bursts of sudden spooks, and they feel just as well developed as the other scary set pieces, complimenting the nervous tension and compounding it rather than detracting. There is one moment that happens so fast, that is so unexpected, that I was literally blinking for several seconds trying to determine if what I was watching was actually transpiring. It was so shocking that I was trying to keep up, and yet, like the other decisions, it didn't feel cheap. I'm convinced this one "ohmygod" buzz-worthy moment will go down in modern horror history, being discussed in the same vein as the speeding bus in the first Final Destination film. I have this level of praise even for the jump scares. The movie doesn't soft-pedal the abuse that Cecilia endures, nor does it exploit her pain and suffering for tacky thrills. This is a socially relevant reinterpretation of the source material, dealing with themes that couldn't be more relevant to today. The movie examines toxic masculinity and gaslighting but with a supernatural sci-fi spin, but it never loses the grounding in the relatable plight of its protagonist. Cecilia is a character that has suffered trauma that she cannot fully even process, so that even when she's on her own, she's still discovering the depth of how exactly this very bad man has reshaped her perception and fears. We don't need to see Adrian explicitly abuse Cecilia to understand the impact of his toxic relationship. Within minutes, Whannell has already told us enough with how terrified and cautious she is when making her late-night escape from the bed of her sleeping monster. Her all-consuming fear is enough to fill us in. This is a woman who is taking a big risk because she feels her life depends upon it. Later, nobody believes her fantastic claims about her ex still haunting her and posing a threat, convincing her it's all in her head, and some of them questioning whether the abuse was made up as well. The correlations with domestic violence and gaslighting are obvious, yes, but this dramatic territory is given knowing sympathy and consideration from Whannell. It's not something tacked on simply to feel bad for our heroine, or to feel relevant with headlines of monstrous man accounting for years of monstrous actions preying upon women. It's a complete reinvention of a classic to suit our times as well as taking advantage of what that classic source offers. This is how you can adapt stories we've seen dozens of times to feel like they're fresh. Much of the film rests upon Moss (The Handmaid's Tale) and she is truly fantastic. We're living in an exciting new era where horror movies have reclaimed their social relevance, and they are providing talented actresses to unleash Oscar-caliber performances (Florence Pugh in Midsommar, Lupita Nyong'o in Us, Toni Collette in Hereditary, Ana Taylor-Joy in The Witch). The role requires Moss to demonstrate much through a series of emotional breakdowns. It's not just getting glassy-eyed and looking scared. Cecilia is a survivor struggling to regain her security while also being heard, and her breaking points of sanity and desperation cannot be one-note. Moss is no stranger to enduring the indignity of condescending men from her TV roles, and she was beautifully unhinged in a memorable moment from Us. She's the perfect actress to take Whannell's character and give credence to her vulnerability, uncertainty, and inner strength. The movie isn't perfect but it accomplishes a clear majority of its artistic aims with confidence and style. It's too long at over two hours and there are a few too many scenarios that start to feel like it's repeating the same points. I'm glad Whannell doesn't waste too much time whether or not Cecilia believes her bad man has gone invisible. The supporting characters are a bit underwritten and utilized primarily as Sympathetic Figures Turning to Concerned Figures and then as Potential Targets. This extends to the relationship between Adrian and his brother (Michael Dorman). There has to be more here that could have been explored there, especially as it relates to Cecilia. The musical score is heavy on loud, ominous tones and rumbling interference. The special effects are sparingly used, and while the invisible suit was initially a design that made me shake my head. In practice, it actually looks pretty interesting and threatening. There is one misstep that feels glaring. Before the end of the movie, there have been a few "hey what about… ?" instances, but they were easy to put out of mind. Whannell drops one major announcement late in the movie but seems to gloss over the extra leverage it provides Cecilia, and her inability to capitalize on this turn of events seems odd considering her antipathy for her attacker as well as the weakness that she can exploit. As I walked out of my screening for The Invisible Man, I kept reviewing just how many different moments, elements, sequences, and choices added up to a thoroughly suspenseful, satisfying, and entertaining trip at the movies. Whannell has a natural feel for genre horror as well as how to treat it in an elevated manner where it can say real things about real issues while also doing a real good job of making you really anxious. Intense from the first moment onward, this is a streamlined, finely honed horror movie for our modern age. Even the jump scares work! This is already turning into a promising year for indie horror, and The Invisible Man is the first great film of the new year and the new decade. Nate's Grade: A-
    Nate Z Super Reviewer

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