The Kids Are All Right Reviews

  • Sep 16, 2020

    Not enough burritos...

    Not enough burritos...

  • Jun 15, 2020

    Its characters were so unlikable and so unrelatable I struggled to sit through it.

    Its characters were so unlikable and so unrelatable I struggled to sit through it.

  • Apr 08, 2020

    Absolutely absorbing .

    Absolutely absorbing .

  • Feb 26, 2020

    Strange but wonderful film

    Strange but wonderful film

  • Dec 06, 2019

    Lovely. A beautiful movie about the changing face of family life and love.

    Lovely. A beautiful movie about the changing face of family life and love.

  • Nov 13, 2019

    Its is so Misleading!

    Its is so Misleading!

  • Oct 12, 2019

    3.5/5. Well acted and awkwardly entertaining, it has a few problems with unlikable characters and how those characters re treated by the film is very unbalanced.

    3.5/5. Well acted and awkwardly entertaining, it has a few problems with unlikable characters and how those characters re treated by the film is very unbalanced.

  • Oct 08, 2019

    Honest, heart-wrenching, and at times hilarious, The kids are all right handles delicate, under-explored themes with a deft touch —- making for a unique and enjoyable exploration of the family dynamic, and a red hot showcase for its three masterful leads. Iroh's grade: A-

    Honest, heart-wrenching, and at times hilarious, The kids are all right handles delicate, under-explored themes with a deft touch —- making for a unique and enjoyable exploration of the family dynamic, and a red hot showcase for its three masterful leads. Iroh's grade: A-

  • Sep 27, 2019

    I remember liking this movie.

    I remember liking this movie.

  • Sep 09, 2019

    Lisa Cholodenko established herself as one of the most fascinating independent filmmakers working in Hollywood with this funny but deceptively deep exploration of what happens when a relationship breaks down during a midlife crisis. Unfortunately she hasn't made a film since 2010 despite this movie garnering a Best Picture nomination and it's sad when seeing the great work that Marielle Heller and Tamara Jenkins have produced in recent years. However if this stands as her biggest directorial success it is one impressive film and while it all wraps up a little too quickly and perfectly for me it moves along pleasantly for it's first hour and twenty minutes. Successful lesbian couple Jules, Julianne Moore, and Nic, Annette Bening, face difficulties in getting along as they both experience mid life crises and Jules feels that Nic does not support her career ambition of becoming a landscaper. They raise Joni, Mia Wasikowska, and Laser, Josh Hutcherson, both of whom were conceived through a sperm donor and one of the mothers. Laser urges his sister to contact their father as she has turned 18 and she eventually rings carefree farmer and restaurateur Paul, Mark Ruffalo, whom she bonds with when the three meet for coffee. The meeting is discovered by the mothers and Paul comes to meet them as well, hiring Jules to landscape his garden. They begin an affair due to him giving her more recognition than Nic does and she begins to fight more with Nic who feels that she is being pushed out of her family. Nic and the children discover Jules' deceptions but are able to move past this complication due to their love for one another. The film gets the awkwardness of certain conversations just right as the first meeting between Paul and his children doesn't just flow naturally, it requires direct questions and uncomfortably long silences to begin a real conversation. The conflicts too seem regular as people don't just erupt immediately and comments that seem cutting to some are well intentioned. When Bening angrily tells Moore that she should "Slow down with the micromanaging" after being urged to stop drinking wine I was reminded of relationships that I have had with my family members. We hurt the people we love the most because we feel comfortable expressing our feelings around them and often we don't express these feelings as we should, they come out angry and barbed instead of gentle and cautioning. Cholodenko understands how these relationships work as they aren't the stuff of soap operas with tensions heating up very quickly instead several factors combine to cause someone to lash out against the person they care about most. Another major asset of the film is it's top notch cast as everybody from Bening to Hutcherson is a distinguished professional and their talents are put to great use here. Ruffalo gets to play an almost self parody as he is a casual slacker bro who is somehow wealthy and financially stable but he feels like Terry from You Can Count On Me (2000) grown up in many ways. He has the desire to experience the wonders of being a parent but isn't ready to accept the responsibility leaving him emotionally unfulfilled. Bening and Moore make a wonderful pair as Bening gets to play uptight and nervous as well as caring and concerned for her children while Moore gets to play carefree but also lost. Of the two I have to say I think Moore gives the better performance as she gets slighty more to do but I do not begrudge Bening's Best Actress nomination and will always recall her quietly devastated reaction to finding her wife's hair in another person's bedroom as a wonderful moment of subtle acting. Even the children get to shine as Hutcherson and Wasikowska prove themselves to be very capable young actors in just a few scenes as they don't shrink in the presence of the accomplished older actors they work with. My only real issue with the film is it's ending as we jump from Bening confronting Moore about her affair, a scene that is handled beautifully, to Moore being called by Ruffalo and her easily rejecting him. Within ten minutes Ruffalo is completely cut out of the lives of his biological children and we are meant to believe that the family has completely forgiven Moore for her actions. Something about this seemed a little too hasty for me and when everything prior to this had been handled with so much grace it was strange to be so quickly left with an unsatisfactory ending.

    Lisa Cholodenko established herself as one of the most fascinating independent filmmakers working in Hollywood with this funny but deceptively deep exploration of what happens when a relationship breaks down during a midlife crisis. Unfortunately she hasn't made a film since 2010 despite this movie garnering a Best Picture nomination and it's sad when seeing the great work that Marielle Heller and Tamara Jenkins have produced in recent years. However if this stands as her biggest directorial success it is one impressive film and while it all wraps up a little too quickly and perfectly for me it moves along pleasantly for it's first hour and twenty minutes. Successful lesbian couple Jules, Julianne Moore, and Nic, Annette Bening, face difficulties in getting along as they both experience mid life crises and Jules feels that Nic does not support her career ambition of becoming a landscaper. They raise Joni, Mia Wasikowska, and Laser, Josh Hutcherson, both of whom were conceived through a sperm donor and one of the mothers. Laser urges his sister to contact their father as she has turned 18 and she eventually rings carefree farmer and restaurateur Paul, Mark Ruffalo, whom she bonds with when the three meet for coffee. The meeting is discovered by the mothers and Paul comes to meet them as well, hiring Jules to landscape his garden. They begin an affair due to him giving her more recognition than Nic does and she begins to fight more with Nic who feels that she is being pushed out of her family. Nic and the children discover Jules' deceptions but are able to move past this complication due to their love for one another. The film gets the awkwardness of certain conversations just right as the first meeting between Paul and his children doesn't just flow naturally, it requires direct questions and uncomfortably long silences to begin a real conversation. The conflicts too seem regular as people don't just erupt immediately and comments that seem cutting to some are well intentioned. When Bening angrily tells Moore that she should "Slow down with the micromanaging" after being urged to stop drinking wine I was reminded of relationships that I have had with my family members. We hurt the people we love the most because we feel comfortable expressing our feelings around them and often we don't express these feelings as we should, they come out angry and barbed instead of gentle and cautioning. Cholodenko understands how these relationships work as they aren't the stuff of soap operas with tensions heating up very quickly instead several factors combine to cause someone to lash out against the person they care about most. Another major asset of the film is it's top notch cast as everybody from Bening to Hutcherson is a distinguished professional and their talents are put to great use here. Ruffalo gets to play an almost self parody as he is a casual slacker bro who is somehow wealthy and financially stable but he feels like Terry from You Can Count On Me (2000) grown up in many ways. He has the desire to experience the wonders of being a parent but isn't ready to accept the responsibility leaving him emotionally unfulfilled. Bening and Moore make a wonderful pair as Bening gets to play uptight and nervous as well as caring and concerned for her children while Moore gets to play carefree but also lost. Of the two I have to say I think Moore gives the better performance as she gets slighty more to do but I do not begrudge Bening's Best Actress nomination and will always recall her quietly devastated reaction to finding her wife's hair in another person's bedroom as a wonderful moment of subtle acting. Even the children get to shine as Hutcherson and Wasikowska prove themselves to be very capable young actors in just a few scenes as they don't shrink in the presence of the accomplished older actors they work with. My only real issue with the film is it's ending as we jump from Bening confronting Moore about her affair, a scene that is handled beautifully, to Moore being called by Ruffalo and her easily rejecting him. Within ten minutes Ruffalo is completely cut out of the lives of his biological children and we are meant to believe that the family has completely forgiven Moore for her actions. Something about this seemed a little too hasty for me and when everything prior to this had been handled with so much grace it was strange to be so quickly left with an unsatisfactory ending.