Spartacus Reviews

  • Apr 06, 2019

    Spartacus shows that you don't need buckets of blood to portray good battle scenes

    Spartacus shows that you don't need buckets of blood to portray good battle scenes

  • Apr 01, 2019

    boring old hollywood style epic with that canned elevator music. still it was the best of its kind

    boring old hollywood style epic with that canned elevator music. still it was the best of its kind

  • Mar 07, 2019

    Spartacus: With terrific preformances, epic action, grandiose storytelling and Kubricks masterful touch, Spartacus is as an epic sword and scandal classic masterpiece of epic movies, one thats bold cinematic entertainment.

    Spartacus: With terrific preformances, epic action, grandiose storytelling and Kubricks masterful touch, Spartacus is as an epic sword and scandal classic masterpiece of epic movies, one thats bold cinematic entertainment.

  • Jan 04, 2019

    A masterpiece that has one of the most memorable scenes in cinematic history. Kids who don't even know who Kirk Douglas is might be able to quote it too. There was also a stage presence by leading men back then that is seldom rivaled today.

    A masterpiece that has one of the most memorable scenes in cinematic history. Kids who don't even know who Kirk Douglas is might be able to quote it too. There was also a stage presence by leading men back then that is seldom rivaled today.

  • Oct 28, 2018

    Although the film may suffer from comparison with the rest of Kubrick's oeuvre, on its own SPARTACUS stands as one of the great cinematic epics, and among the best of the sword and sandal genre, often more memorable and engrossing than modern semi-digital analogues like GLADIATOR. The excitement of the latter is also its downfall: It is a movie about spectacle, about carnal violence, which it partakes in as much it critiques, the story of a virtuous individual who must regain his rightful position of dignity, the spiritually true heir set against the corruption of the undignified usurper-a classic tale of riches to rags to riches, of the prodigal hero returned to his rightful position of power. On the other hand, the story of SPARTACUS is as much about those he inspires as it is about the man himself, a person born into slavery and who flatly rejects claims of hierarchy and power-when given the opportunity, he denies any royal bloodline and, like Cincinnatus or Washington, refuses authority beyond that which is necessary and thrust upon him, breaking the system of violence and inequity rather than trying to beat by playing the gladiatorial games. The titles illustrate this dichotomy perfectly: GLADIATOR looms large and threateningly, a role for Maximus to step into a fill as the true, Platonic, paradigmatic warrior; SPARTACUS, instead, is not only the name of the historical figure who led a slave revolt, but becomes a signifier for all who join that cause, for all of righteous heart, a name we might even claim as our own: "I am Spartacus." In this way, the epic continues to speak to our times: It is easy to see the scenes of the Senate and recognize the backstabbing, the corruption, the hypocrisy of our own political system; and when Crassus speaks of using his wealth to return Rome to its former glory, it is hard not to recognize the terrible parallel avant la lettre: MRGA might be the new SPQR. In its best moments, SPARTACUS achieves a brilliant synthesis of the ancient and the modern-whether America during the creeping fascism of the Red Scare and the Black List, or during the creepy fascism of the Red Caps against BLM-the epic and the personal (in its love story), the heroic and the tragic. For a story set two millennia ago and made a half-century ago, SPARTACUS still feels fresh and alive even without the benefit of added computer graphics or action choreography, because the film doesn't just put the viewer on the edge of her seat, but asks you to rise up and join the chorus in your own voice: I, too, am Spartacus.

    Although the film may suffer from comparison with the rest of Kubrick's oeuvre, on its own SPARTACUS stands as one of the great cinematic epics, and among the best of the sword and sandal genre, often more memorable and engrossing than modern semi-digital analogues like GLADIATOR. The excitement of the latter is also its downfall: It is a movie about spectacle, about carnal violence, which it partakes in as much it critiques, the story of a virtuous individual who must regain his rightful position of dignity, the spiritually true heir set against the corruption of the undignified usurper-a classic tale of riches to rags to riches, of the prodigal hero returned to his rightful position of power. On the other hand, the story of SPARTACUS is as much about those he inspires as it is about the man himself, a person born into slavery and who flatly rejects claims of hierarchy and power-when given the opportunity, he denies any royal bloodline and, like Cincinnatus or Washington, refuses authority beyond that which is necessary and thrust upon him, breaking the system of violence and inequity rather than trying to beat by playing the gladiatorial games. The titles illustrate this dichotomy perfectly: GLADIATOR looms large and threateningly, a role for Maximus to step into a fill as the true, Platonic, paradigmatic warrior; SPARTACUS, instead, is not only the name of the historical figure who led a slave revolt, but becomes a signifier for all who join that cause, for all of righteous heart, a name we might even claim as our own: "I am Spartacus." In this way, the epic continues to speak to our times: It is easy to see the scenes of the Senate and recognize the backstabbing, the corruption, the hypocrisy of our own political system; and when Crassus speaks of using his wealth to return Rome to its former glory, it is hard not to recognize the terrible parallel avant la lettre: MRGA might be the new SPQR. In its best moments, SPARTACUS achieves a brilliant synthesis of the ancient and the modern-whether America during the creeping fascism of the Red Scare and the Black List, or during the creepy fascism of the Red Caps against BLM-the epic and the personal (in its love story), the heroic and the tragic. For a story set two millennia ago and made a half-century ago, SPARTACUS still feels fresh and alive even without the benefit of added computer graphics or action choreography, because the film doesn't just put the viewer on the edge of her seat, but asks you to rise up and join the chorus in your own voice: I, too, am Spartacus.

  • Sep 16, 2018

    Un drama muy bien logrado y con una excelente dirección de Stanley Kubrick

    Un drama muy bien logrado y con una excelente dirección de Stanley Kubrick

  • Aug 19, 2018

    Not exactly a Kubrick's film, but still an enjoyable experience.

    Not exactly a Kubrick's film, but still an enjoyable experience.

  • Aug 04, 2018

    While gaining no points for HISTORICAL accuracy, Kubrick delivers a VIBRANT SPECTACLE with mans eternal quest for freedom at its center. Helped by an amazing cast, with Jean Simmons and Charles Laughton deserving special mention, showing (yet again) that CGI runs second to giving great actors space to perform in.

    While gaining no points for HISTORICAL accuracy, Kubrick delivers a VIBRANT SPECTACLE with mans eternal quest for freedom at its center. Helped by an amazing cast, with Jean Simmons and Charles Laughton deserving special mention, showing (yet again) that CGI runs second to giving great actors space to perform in.

  • Jun 18, 2018

    I simply don't understand the appeal of this film. Epics were a dime a dozen during this era and, for the most part, I can respect what was accomplished, although hearing and watching Shakespearean actors portray foreign roles is immensely annoying. However, "Spartacus" is in a class by itself. Kirk Douglas is too American, too old and too wrong for this part in every way. Sir Laurence Olivier and Peter Ustinov save it from being a complete disaster, but attributing this snoozefest to Stanley Kubrick is just a shame. The gladiator training scenes were boring and poorly choreographed. The big battle scene is too long and anti-climactic. Compared to "Ben-Hur," released the year prior, "Spartacus" is a bore. I never care about Spartacus' hatred toward slavery. I never quite see the transformation from slave to revolutionary. It just happens. As a result, character development is mixed and, in some cases, completely lost.

    I simply don't understand the appeal of this film. Epics were a dime a dozen during this era and, for the most part, I can respect what was accomplished, although hearing and watching Shakespearean actors portray foreign roles is immensely annoying. However, "Spartacus" is in a class by itself. Kirk Douglas is too American, too old and too wrong for this part in every way. Sir Laurence Olivier and Peter Ustinov save it from being a complete disaster, but attributing this snoozefest to Stanley Kubrick is just a shame. The gladiator training scenes were boring and poorly choreographed. The big battle scene is too long and anti-climactic. Compared to "Ben-Hur," released the year prior, "Spartacus" is a bore. I never care about Spartacus' hatred toward slavery. I never quite see the transformation from slave to revolutionary. It just happens. As a result, character development is mixed and, in some cases, completely lost.

  • May 15, 2018

    They just don't make em like this anymore. Spartacus impresses on multiple levels from acting, writing and action. It's a must see classic.

    They just don't make em like this anymore. Spartacus impresses on multiple levels from acting, writing and action. It's a must see classic.