Reviews

  • Sep 23, 2021

    A miserable watch. The pathetic soap opera ( Dallas ( twist at the end , sums up the wretchedness of the script.

    A miserable watch. The pathetic soap opera ( Dallas ( twist at the end , sums up the wretchedness of the script.

  • Jun 04, 2021

    the plot is also nice but the film is boring at times

    the plot is also nice but the film is boring at times

  • Feb 04, 2021

    Meh. A slick and entertaining opening sequence unmatched by all that follows with a twist that fails in being truly shocking. Good soundtrack and exotic European atmosphere but overall an average script.

    Meh. A slick and entertaining opening sequence unmatched by all that follows with a twist that fails in being truly shocking. Good soundtrack and exotic European atmosphere but overall an average script.

  • Dec 14, 2020

    Love this movie. It's all about second chances and I am all for that.

    Love this movie. It's all about second chances and I am all for that.

  • Sep 19, 2020

    Top thriller. Plenty of surprises throughout. Rebecca Rijn is not only beautiful but sexy. Antonio B. is hot too. She does a dance that is unforgettable. A Bolero type music begins with diamonds and kissing and everything you would want. It never lets up. The same music ends the show, and you realize what really happens.

    Top thriller. Plenty of surprises throughout. Rebecca Rijn is not only beautiful but sexy. Antonio B. is hot too. She does a dance that is unforgettable. A Bolero type music begins with diamonds and kissing and everything you would want. It never lets up. The same music ends the show, and you realize what really happens.

  • Sep 18, 2020

    A film noir sans the standard antihero, all lurid seduction and style, its empty flash all desire, all intrigue, looping in on itself to produce De Palma's own dizzying version of vertigo.

    A film noir sans the standard antihero, all lurid seduction and style, its empty flash all desire, all intrigue, looping in on itself to produce De Palma's own dizzying version of vertigo.

  • Apr 21, 2020

    A movie where, knowing who the director is and how he likes to make movies, is important to know prior to watching the movie. With that understanding this is a very enjoyable movie. It is quirky, very noir and stylish. All of which ultimately fits into the ending.

    A movie where, knowing who the director is and how he likes to make movies, is important to know prior to watching the movie. With that understanding this is a very enjoyable movie. It is quirky, very noir and stylish. All of which ultimately fits into the ending.

  • Mar 15, 2020

    "That was rotten" is the least I could say.

    "That was rotten" is the least I could say.

  • Jan 31, 2019

    So what if Brian De Palma's best days were behind him? That doesn't mean he was incapable of turning out some acceptably enjoyable motion pictures. Here, a daring heist performed during the Cannes Film Festival kicks off a twist and turn-filled thriller after criminal Laure Ash (Rebecca Romijn) double crosses her partners to save the victim of the theft from being killed. While on the run, Laure is mistaken for a suicidal widow and uses her doppelganger's death to cover her tracks. Meeting a high-powered businessman (Peter Coyote) on a plane bound for America, all things seem to be working out for Laure. Flash forward seven years later and an ex-paparazzo (Antonio Banderas) lured into one more well paying job takes Laure's photograph, as she has become wife to the businessman-turned-ambassador and is trying to keep her past hidden. Unfortunately for her, once the photograph is made public, her ex-partners know where she is and are out for revenge. Now, Laure will have to hatch a devious plan and she might just be willing to put everyone else in danger in order to save her own skin. A box office bomb upon its initial release, it's not quite as bad as many have made it out to be over the years. This is a visually sumptuous film, buoyed by De Palma's sparse use of split screen which feels like a throwback to the cinema of old. Romijn is certainly believable as a sexy seductress of a criminal. The striptease she performs near the end of the film is the best of its decade and the hottest mainstream erotic dance since Jamie Lee Curtis turned Arnold Schwarzenegger on in "True Lies" eight years earlier. Banderas is good in his role, although one gets the feeling he could have been capable of more given a larger opportunity. Therein lies the major problem that weights "Femme Fatale" down - we're given all of the information we need to follow the film and yet it still feels somehow empty. We move from one plot point to the next, but there's no flow between the scenes. They're like snapshots taken from Banderas's camera - they're nice to look at but you suspect there's more in between the photographs that you'd like to see. I feel the same way about this film. It's a good piece, but if the characters were given more room to develop, I think the aforementioned twists and turns would have had more impact and "Femme Fatale" would have ranked higher in De Palma's body of work.

    So what if Brian De Palma's best days were behind him? That doesn't mean he was incapable of turning out some acceptably enjoyable motion pictures. Here, a daring heist performed during the Cannes Film Festival kicks off a twist and turn-filled thriller after criminal Laure Ash (Rebecca Romijn) double crosses her partners to save the victim of the theft from being killed. While on the run, Laure is mistaken for a suicidal widow and uses her doppelganger's death to cover her tracks. Meeting a high-powered businessman (Peter Coyote) on a plane bound for America, all things seem to be working out for Laure. Flash forward seven years later and an ex-paparazzo (Antonio Banderas) lured into one more well paying job takes Laure's photograph, as she has become wife to the businessman-turned-ambassador and is trying to keep her past hidden. Unfortunately for her, once the photograph is made public, her ex-partners know where she is and are out for revenge. Now, Laure will have to hatch a devious plan and she might just be willing to put everyone else in danger in order to save her own skin. A box office bomb upon its initial release, it's not quite as bad as many have made it out to be over the years. This is a visually sumptuous film, buoyed by De Palma's sparse use of split screen which feels like a throwback to the cinema of old. Romijn is certainly believable as a sexy seductress of a criminal. The striptease she performs near the end of the film is the best of its decade and the hottest mainstream erotic dance since Jamie Lee Curtis turned Arnold Schwarzenegger on in "True Lies" eight years earlier. Banderas is good in his role, although one gets the feeling he could have been capable of more given a larger opportunity. Therein lies the major problem that weights "Femme Fatale" down - we're given all of the information we need to follow the film and yet it still feels somehow empty. We move from one plot point to the next, but there's no flow between the scenes. They're like snapshots taken from Banderas's camera - they're nice to look at but you suspect there's more in between the photographs that you'd like to see. I feel the same way about this film. It's a good piece, but if the characters were given more room to develop, I think the aforementioned twists and turns would have had more impact and "Femme Fatale" would have ranked higher in De Palma's body of work.

  • Dec 14, 2017

    It may be completely inevitable and full of coincidences, but Femme Fatale is a brilliant, visually masterful bit of entertainment.

    It may be completely inevitable and full of coincidences, but Femme Fatale is a brilliant, visually masterful bit of entertainment.