Beanpole (Dylda) Reviews

  • Feb 13, 2021

    I really don't get the point (if there's one) nor the relationship between the characters, however its distinct and picturesque style is interesting enough.

    I really don't get the point (if there's one) nor the relationship between the characters, however its distinct and picturesque style is interesting enough.

  • Jan 29, 2021

    I will give it a 3 based on the fact that others think it was artistically relevant. I could not watch past the first - about 15-20 minutes - the subject matter was horribly depressing, and I am not easily affected in that way. Ugh.

    I will give it a 3 based on the fact that others think it was artistically relevant. I could not watch past the first - about 15-20 minutes - the subject matter was horribly depressing, and I am not easily affected in that way. Ugh.

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    Alec B Super Reviewer
    Jan 28, 2021

    Mostly impressed that, given the subject matter, this thing isn't just a parade of misery for its own sake.

    Mostly impressed that, given the subject matter, this thing isn't just a parade of misery for its own sake.

  • Nate Z Super Reviewer
    Jan 16, 2021

    Deeply depressing but empathetic to a fault, Beanpole might just be the most artistically uncomfortable movie of the year. It's a Russian film set in Leningrad one year after World War II and the consequences of that awful conflict. Iya (Viktoria Miroshnichenko), our "beanpole," fought in the war until her PTSD got too bad; she literally freezes in place like a statue when triggered. She's working in a hospital and looking after her best friend's child when tragedy strikes. That friend, Masha (Vasilisa Perelygina), desperately wants another child but cannot get pregnant. She pressures Iya to become her surrogate womb, and Iya feels so guilty that she agrees. From there, Beanpole chronicles the pain of not just these women but a pall that hangs over the nation, as people try to return to a normal that begs questioning whether it ever existed. It's about hurt people lashing out and hurting others, some intentional and some unintentional. A coerced sex scene (a.k.a. rape) between Iya, a blackmailed but kindly middle-aged doctor, and Masha is immediately troublesome and yet thanks to the careful consideration of co-writer/director Kantemir Balagov, you can understand the motivation that lead each to being there. Masha is setup as the villain of the second half, knowingly guilting and pressuring Iya, taking away her agency, bullying her, and then there's an extended scene toward the end where Masha meets the wealthy parents of her fledgling boyfriend. She reveals the lengths she would go to survive life during wartime as a woman soldier in a predominantly male encampment. It might not be enough to reverse your stance on her as a person but it definitely complicates your understanding. The whole movie is about people doing what they need to in an unjust world to survive. Beanpole opens up into a larger mosaic of condemnation about how women are treated by society, and each member of this tale is a victim in their own way, with their own story and own past and own demons, even the cruel ones. Beanpole has a gorgeous use of color, a deliberative sense of pacing, and outstanding acting that feels completely natural. It's also, as mentioned, super depressing and hard for me to fathom many that will be eager to be this uncomfortable. For those courageous enough, you might find a beauty in the dignity of these women navigating post-war trauma and resilience. Nate's Grade: B

    Deeply depressing but empathetic to a fault, Beanpole might just be the most artistically uncomfortable movie of the year. It's a Russian film set in Leningrad one year after World War II and the consequences of that awful conflict. Iya (Viktoria Miroshnichenko), our "beanpole," fought in the war until her PTSD got too bad; she literally freezes in place like a statue when triggered. She's working in a hospital and looking after her best friend's child when tragedy strikes. That friend, Masha (Vasilisa Perelygina), desperately wants another child but cannot get pregnant. She pressures Iya to become her surrogate womb, and Iya feels so guilty that she agrees. From there, Beanpole chronicles the pain of not just these women but a pall that hangs over the nation, as people try to return to a normal that begs questioning whether it ever existed. It's about hurt people lashing out and hurting others, some intentional and some unintentional. A coerced sex scene (a.k.a. rape) between Iya, a blackmailed but kindly middle-aged doctor, and Masha is immediately troublesome and yet thanks to the careful consideration of co-writer/director Kantemir Balagov, you can understand the motivation that lead each to being there. Masha is setup as the villain of the second half, knowingly guilting and pressuring Iya, taking away her agency, bullying her, and then there's an extended scene toward the end where Masha meets the wealthy parents of her fledgling boyfriend. She reveals the lengths she would go to survive life during wartime as a woman soldier in a predominantly male encampment. It might not be enough to reverse your stance on her as a person but it definitely complicates your understanding. The whole movie is about people doing what they need to in an unjust world to survive. Beanpole opens up into a larger mosaic of condemnation about how women are treated by society, and each member of this tale is a victim in their own way, with their own story and own past and own demons, even the cruel ones. Beanpole has a gorgeous use of color, a deliberative sense of pacing, and outstanding acting that feels completely natural. It's also, as mentioned, super depressing and hard for me to fathom many that will be eager to be this uncomfortable. For those courageous enough, you might find a beauty in the dignity of these women navigating post-war trauma and resilience. Nate's Grade: B

  • Jan 09, 2021

    4.25/5. The cinematography here is especially inspired. Other elements vary between genuinely-inspired and aptly-gap-filling. Not entirely a coup de grace, but a genuine work of young art.

    4.25/5. The cinematography here is especially inspired. Other elements vary between genuinely-inspired and aptly-gap-filling. Not entirely a coup de grace, but a genuine work of young art.

  • Jan 01, 2021

    Fascinating, layered and thought-provoking, Beanpole is a strong post-war drama that is impressively written, directed and acted.

    Fascinating, layered and thought-provoking, Beanpole is a strong post-war drama that is impressively written, directed and acted.

  • Dec 31, 2020

    About thirty minutes into this film I noticed it had no music. Its absence seemed to add to the tension between the characters, and the pain they felt. The use of the colour green in the film - the dress, the coat, the house paint - seems so deliberate as to have symbolic value. Perhaps a new spring for Leningrad after the war's end? It could be representative of Masha's envy too. The most deplorable characters are the richest and most powerful, so it seems the creators of the film are making a political statement.

    About thirty minutes into this film I noticed it had no music. Its absence seemed to add to the tension between the characters, and the pain they felt. The use of the colour green in the film - the dress, the coat, the house paint - seems so deliberate as to have symbolic value. Perhaps a new spring for Leningrad after the war's end? It could be representative of Masha's envy too. The most deplorable characters are the richest and most powerful, so it seems the creators of the film are making a political statement.

  • Dec 29, 2020

    The whole visually pleasing cinematography make it bearable to watch, but there is no special touch of the plot.

    The whole visually pleasing cinematography make it bearable to watch, but there is no special touch of the plot.

  • Dec 29, 2020

    A beautiful story that shows, the pains and the consequences of the period in which the film takes place, besides being a good approach on PTSD and loneliness

    A beautiful story that shows, the pains and the consequences of the period in which the film takes place, besides being a good approach on PTSD and loneliness

  • Dec 28, 2020

    The story of Beanpole is complicated, but it's worth sticking around as the layers are exposed. The story revolves around two women; one, Marsha, desperate to find her place as a woman amongst a war torn county; the other, Iya (aka Beanpole) is reeling from the trauma of war, and the confusion of her sexuality. Intertwined within the women's fables, is a distraught, desperate friendship, constantly teetering on the edge of love and sin. Descriptors: war, love, death, homosexuality, and revenge. Cinematography: warm, dark, and cold. Script: Original, every scene was a surprise.

    The story of Beanpole is complicated, but it's worth sticking around as the layers are exposed. The story revolves around two women; one, Marsha, desperate to find her place as a woman amongst a war torn county; the other, Iya (aka Beanpole) is reeling from the trauma of war, and the confusion of her sexuality. Intertwined within the women's fables, is a distraught, desperate friendship, constantly teetering on the edge of love and sin. Descriptors: war, love, death, homosexuality, and revenge. Cinematography: warm, dark, and cold. Script: Original, every scene was a surprise.