Dark City Reviews

  • Jun 08, 2019

    Love the story and the realization. You really immerse into that visually compelling world with no effort at all.

    Love the story and the realization. You really immerse into that visually compelling world with no effort at all.

  • Apr 20, 2019

    Simply one of the greats - must be watch with equilibrium

    Simply one of the greats - must be watch with equilibrium

  • Mar 30, 2019

    Dark City is definitely a stylistically interesting film, with grand sets, trippy visuals and a cast delivering fun noirish performances, but it also has hyperactive editing, characters spouting reams of exposition, and the unshakeable feeling that a huge amount of information is being kept from the viewer is order to deliver a twist at the end. That being said, it feels ahead of its time, laying the groundwork for The Matrix, Inception, and many more.

    Dark City is definitely a stylistically interesting film, with grand sets, trippy visuals and a cast delivering fun noirish performances, but it also has hyperactive editing, characters spouting reams of exposition, and the unshakeable feeling that a huge amount of information is being kept from the viewer is order to deliver a twist at the end. That being said, it feels ahead of its time, laying the groundwork for The Matrix, Inception, and many more.

  • Mar 20, 2019

    Good movie, dark as I like them... Suspense and sci-fi merged in a nice way

    Good movie, dark as I like them... Suspense and sci-fi merged in a nice way

  • Mar 04, 2019

    Exciting sci-fi that's full of twists and turns and mystery!

    Exciting sci-fi that's full of twists and turns and mystery!

  • Feb 14, 2019

    Though I didn't like the third act as much as the first two, Dark City is a pretty good tech-noir movie with some dark visuals, suspense, and good performances.

    Though I didn't like the third act as much as the first two, Dark City is a pretty good tech-noir movie with some dark visuals, suspense, and good performances.

  • Feb 13, 2019

    A movie with great visuals and an appealing story and setting, but lacking in actual suspense, woorden acting and a plot that suffers from over-exposition by the characters.

    A movie with great visuals and an appealing story and setting, but lacking in actual suspense, woorden acting and a plot that suffers from over-exposition by the characters.

  • Feb 04, 2019

    There's an old urban legend where a man wakes up in the bathtub of a strange hotel to find his kidney missing. This film begins in much the same manner, the only difference being what has been removed from John Murdoch is a lot more precious than his kidney . . . it's his memory. If you have ever questioned what came before "The Matrix" thematically, "Dark City" is the answer. A group of beings known collectively as "The Strangers" have created a closed-off world where they can study the human race in an effort to learn about the concept of the soul. Changing the memories of the city's inhabitants as easily as most people would change clothes - all in the name of expediting their research - they run across one individual who has become resistant to their methods and has decided to fight back. While this is certainly an original, inventive idea, I have to say that "The Matrix" took the hypothesis one step further and overshadowed "Dark City" in the process. This is nothing against Alex Proyas's film though, as it is a delight on its own merit. Rufus Sewell plays the appropriately puzzled Murdoch well with the ever-reliable Jennifer Connelly standing in as his love interest. Kiefer Sutherland makes a creepy doctor who holds allegiance to "The Strangers" and the vastly underrated Richard O'Brien plays the malignant Mr. Hand as no one else could. The design of the sets and the visual effects is superb, although they were a bit too dimly lit in a few places for my taste. As good as the film is, I think the basic idea behind "Dark City" is much larger than the motion picture itself could properly convey to its audience. I'm not sure if this was due to budgetary restraints or the limitations of its authors, but the movie felt like it was lacking in several aspects. I would have liked to know more about "The Strangers" prior to the creation of the city. I would have liked to see more interaction between these alien beings as well. Keeping them at arm's length to the audience might have seemed like a good notion at the time, but the overall effect somewhat hampers the presentation. A side note, another film was obviously inspired by "Dark City" - one of Connelly's own two years later - as the visual elements of the dock sequence overlooking the ocean appears to have been lifted directly from this film and implanted into "Requiem for a Dream." Well, influence makes the art world go 'round, I suppose.

    There's an old urban legend where a man wakes up in the bathtub of a strange hotel to find his kidney missing. This film begins in much the same manner, the only difference being what has been removed from John Murdoch is a lot more precious than his kidney . . . it's his memory. If you have ever questioned what came before "The Matrix" thematically, "Dark City" is the answer. A group of beings known collectively as "The Strangers" have created a closed-off world where they can study the human race in an effort to learn about the concept of the soul. Changing the memories of the city's inhabitants as easily as most people would change clothes - all in the name of expediting their research - they run across one individual who has become resistant to their methods and has decided to fight back. While this is certainly an original, inventive idea, I have to say that "The Matrix" took the hypothesis one step further and overshadowed "Dark City" in the process. This is nothing against Alex Proyas's film though, as it is a delight on its own merit. Rufus Sewell plays the appropriately puzzled Murdoch well with the ever-reliable Jennifer Connelly standing in as his love interest. Kiefer Sutherland makes a creepy doctor who holds allegiance to "The Strangers" and the vastly underrated Richard O'Brien plays the malignant Mr. Hand as no one else could. The design of the sets and the visual effects is superb, although they were a bit too dimly lit in a few places for my taste. As good as the film is, I think the basic idea behind "Dark City" is much larger than the motion picture itself could properly convey to its audience. I'm not sure if this was due to budgetary restraints or the limitations of its authors, but the movie felt like it was lacking in several aspects. I would have liked to know more about "The Strangers" prior to the creation of the city. I would have liked to see more interaction between these alien beings as well. Keeping them at arm's length to the audience might have seemed like a good notion at the time, but the overall effect somewhat hampers the presentation. A side note, another film was obviously inspired by "Dark City" - one of Connelly's own two years later - as the visual elements of the dock sequence overlooking the ocean appears to have been lifted directly from this film and implanted into "Requiem for a Dream." Well, influence makes the art world go 'round, I suppose.

  • Jan 21, 2019

    I cannot even believe they got the green light to make this. I kept wondering if it was originally a graphic novel, and the answer turns out to be NO. And no wonderï¿ 1/2"there is nothing in it that makes full sense, even with The Big (mini) Reveal at the end. Characters change, the storyline keeps leaping from here to thereï¿ 1/2"inexplicablyï¿ 1/2"and by the end its all supposed to be explained away with the reveal. By the end I still didn't understand half of it, but, it definitely had style and attitude. So lets just say Dark City succeeds by being a series of set pieces that allow the filmmaker to do whatever, conjure up whatever, and explain it away in a very meek "Final Battle and Reveal". I felt a sense of dread throughout the whole thing, and by the end I was like oh ghod its finally wrapped up. And not very satisfyingly.

    I cannot even believe they got the green light to make this. I kept wondering if it was originally a graphic novel, and the answer turns out to be NO. And no wonderï¿ 1/2"there is nothing in it that makes full sense, even with The Big (mini) Reveal at the end. Characters change, the storyline keeps leaping from here to thereï¿ 1/2"inexplicablyï¿ 1/2"and by the end its all supposed to be explained away with the reveal. By the end I still didn't understand half of it, but, it definitely had style and attitude. So lets just say Dark City succeeds by being a series of set pieces that allow the filmmaker to do whatever, conjure up whatever, and explain it away in a very meek "Final Battle and Reveal". I felt a sense of dread throughout the whole thing, and by the end I was like oh ghod its finally wrapped up. And not very satisfyingly.

  • Dec 14, 2018

    For science fiction fans the late 90s were great years. The most famous and popular of all was The Matrix but Alex Proyas's much more thought-provoking(which is saying something as the Matrix, at least the first movie was very thought provoking itself) film is just as good. No movie can ever have too much atmosphere, and Dark City exudes it from every frame of celluloid. Alex Proyas' world isn't just a playground for his characters to romp in -- it's an ominous place where viewers can get lost. We don't just coolly observe the bizarre, ever-changing skyline; we plunge into the city's benighted depths, following the protagonist as he explores the secrets of this grim place where the sun never shines. Visually, this film isn't just impressive, it's a tour de force. Thankfully, Dark City doesn't have an "all style, no substance" problem, either, because there's a mind-challenging story to go along with the eye candy. Proyas hasn't written this film for the passive viewer. To become involved in Dark City, thinking is mandatory.

    For science fiction fans the late 90s were great years. The most famous and popular of all was The Matrix but Alex Proyas's much more thought-provoking(which is saying something as the Matrix, at least the first movie was very thought provoking itself) film is just as good. No movie can ever have too much atmosphere, and Dark City exudes it from every frame of celluloid. Alex Proyas' world isn't just a playground for his characters to romp in -- it's an ominous place where viewers can get lost. We don't just coolly observe the bizarre, ever-changing skyline; we plunge into the city's benighted depths, following the protagonist as he explores the secrets of this grim place where the sun never shines. Visually, this film isn't just impressive, it's a tour de force. Thankfully, Dark City doesn't have an "all style, no substance" problem, either, because there's a mind-challenging story to go along with the eye candy. Proyas hasn't written this film for the passive viewer. To become involved in Dark City, thinking is mandatory.