Death on the Nile Reviews

  • May 02, 2021

    Ustinov's performance is wonderful, and the likes of Niven, Lansbury, and Smith compliment him well. Bette Davis, Olivia Hussey, and Lois Chiles are three other A-listers also present. I thought that MacCorkindale's performance was comparatively weaker, but certainly not distracting. For some, the murder not taking place until halfway in might detract the experience, but the characters and drama are interesting enough to maintain the suspense even before the all-important event. The humor adds to the film's quality, despite occasionally missing its mark.

    Ustinov's performance is wonderful, and the likes of Niven, Lansbury, and Smith compliment him well. Bette Davis, Olivia Hussey, and Lois Chiles are three other A-listers also present. I thought that MacCorkindale's performance was comparatively weaker, but certainly not distracting. For some, the murder not taking place until halfway in might detract the experience, but the characters and drama are interesting enough to maintain the suspense even before the all-important event. The humor adds to the film's quality, despite occasionally missing its mark.

  • Apr 16, 2021

    Riveting as clues and suspects pile up! John Guillermin's mystery period drama Death on the Nile (1978) is a classic motion picture adaptation of Agatha Christie's beloved whodunit. Guillermin's direction is enthralling as he shows how each character could have committed the murder with revealing shots of clues all over this Egyptian cruiser. Agatha Christie's writing is timeless are you are intrigued by this curious romance drama within a series of murder mysteries that get increasingly complex. Between Guillermin's thoughtful direction that guides the viewer through the entire story carefully and Christie's peerless narrative, this is a fascinating mystery film like few can compare. Peter Ustinov's lead role as Hercule Poirot is funny and stern simultaneously. Instead of David Suchet's fastidious private detective with a quick temper and happening upon information, we get Ustinov eavesdropping on purpose with a keen sense of deduction. Ustinov is very straightforward and that's fun in his own fashion. David Suchet just is Poirot to me now, but Ustinov is admirable here with a fantastic performance as Agatha Christie's legendary Belgian detective Poirot. David Niven's Colonel Race is likable and funny alongside Ustinov's good natured Poirot. Mia Farrow plays unhinged and charming with equal vigor as Jacqueline de Bellefort. She steals every scene with her innocent and ethereal look. She's quite remarkable and realistic here. Simon MacCorkindale is intriguing as the male interest Simon Doyle with his shifting loves. Lois Chiles is excellent as the cold and uncaring rich woman Linnet Ridgeway and an alluring lady of love. Angela Lansbury's drunken author Salome Otterbourne and Bette Davis' chastising and demanding lady of means Marie Van Schuyler are both delightful to watch. Maggie Smith is very funny as the hateful servant to Davis' cruel mistress. Jane Birkin is adorable and endearing as a poor maid Louise Bourget. I felt terrible for her, but Birkin plays the part so well. I adore Olivia Hussey as Rosalie Otterbourne, the long suffering daughter to Lansbury's alcoholic mother. She's enchanting with her naturally cute looks, piercing eyes, and soft voice. Besides Peter Ustinov and Mia Farrow, Olivia Hussey gives the best performance of this outstanding cast. Jon Finch's James Ferguson is shady and interesting. George Kennedy's shifty dealmaker Andrew Pennington is great. Jack Warden's German Dr. Ludwig Bessner is very funny next to the equally stuffy Peter Ustinov as Poirot. I.S. Johar, if stereotypical, if quite quickly hilarious as the bumbling cruise Captain Choudhury. Harry Andrews is right and proper and entertaining as the head butler Barnstaple. I cannot believe one of the servants is played by a young Saeed Jaffrey! Malcolm Cooke's editing cuts pretty often with purpose to always inform the viewer of a new character or clue to this intricate mystery. The pace is so fast and the performances are so engrossing that I found 140 minutes of this version of Death on the Nile to feel like 70. Jack Cardiff's cinematography captures the Egyptian backdrop in stunning far wide shots with cleverly framed medium shots for all the cruise parts, so you don't miss anything as the audience. Furthermore, Peter Murton's production has everything laid out in the sets in a sensible manner so we can see the relevant props and weapons around the ship. Anthony Powell's costumes have very stylish, slinky dresses for all the ladies with gentlemanly suits for the men. I love Nino Rota's dreamy score for Death on the Nile. You feel like you're on an adventure. In short, Death on the Nile has been adapted for film and television numerous times now and Peter Ustinov's 1978 may reign supreme alongside David Suchet's 2004 version.

    Riveting as clues and suspects pile up! John Guillermin's mystery period drama Death on the Nile (1978) is a classic motion picture adaptation of Agatha Christie's beloved whodunit. Guillermin's direction is enthralling as he shows how each character could have committed the murder with revealing shots of clues all over this Egyptian cruiser. Agatha Christie's writing is timeless are you are intrigued by this curious romance drama within a series of murder mysteries that get increasingly complex. Between Guillermin's thoughtful direction that guides the viewer through the entire story carefully and Christie's peerless narrative, this is a fascinating mystery film like few can compare. Peter Ustinov's lead role as Hercule Poirot is funny and stern simultaneously. Instead of David Suchet's fastidious private detective with a quick temper and happening upon information, we get Ustinov eavesdropping on purpose with a keen sense of deduction. Ustinov is very straightforward and that's fun in his own fashion. David Suchet just is Poirot to me now, but Ustinov is admirable here with a fantastic performance as Agatha Christie's legendary Belgian detective Poirot. David Niven's Colonel Race is likable and funny alongside Ustinov's good natured Poirot. Mia Farrow plays unhinged and charming with equal vigor as Jacqueline de Bellefort. She steals every scene with her innocent and ethereal look. She's quite remarkable and realistic here. Simon MacCorkindale is intriguing as the male interest Simon Doyle with his shifting loves. Lois Chiles is excellent as the cold and uncaring rich woman Linnet Ridgeway and an alluring lady of love. Angela Lansbury's drunken author Salome Otterbourne and Bette Davis' chastising and demanding lady of means Marie Van Schuyler are both delightful to watch. Maggie Smith is very funny as the hateful servant to Davis' cruel mistress. Jane Birkin is adorable and endearing as a poor maid Louise Bourget. I felt terrible for her, but Birkin plays the part so well. I adore Olivia Hussey as Rosalie Otterbourne, the long suffering daughter to Lansbury's alcoholic mother. She's enchanting with her naturally cute looks, piercing eyes, and soft voice. Besides Peter Ustinov and Mia Farrow, Olivia Hussey gives the best performance of this outstanding cast. Jon Finch's James Ferguson is shady and interesting. George Kennedy's shifty dealmaker Andrew Pennington is great. Jack Warden's German Dr. Ludwig Bessner is very funny next to the equally stuffy Peter Ustinov as Poirot. I.S. Johar, if stereotypical, if quite quickly hilarious as the bumbling cruise Captain Choudhury. Harry Andrews is right and proper and entertaining as the head butler Barnstaple. I cannot believe one of the servants is played by a young Saeed Jaffrey! Malcolm Cooke's editing cuts pretty often with purpose to always inform the viewer of a new character or clue to this intricate mystery. The pace is so fast and the performances are so engrossing that I found 140 minutes of this version of Death on the Nile to feel like 70. Jack Cardiff's cinematography captures the Egyptian backdrop in stunning far wide shots with cleverly framed medium shots for all the cruise parts, so you don't miss anything as the audience. Furthermore, Peter Murton's production has everything laid out in the sets in a sensible manner so we can see the relevant props and weapons around the ship. Anthony Powell's costumes have very stylish, slinky dresses for all the ladies with gentlemanly suits for the men. I love Nino Rota's dreamy score for Death on the Nile. You feel like you're on an adventure. In short, Death on the Nile has been adapted for film and television numerous times now and Peter Ustinov's 1978 may reign supreme alongside David Suchet's 2004 version.

  • Jan 09, 2021

    NICE VERSION OF THE CHRISTIE CLASSIC, BUT, FOR ME, THERE WILL NEVER BE A BETTER HERCULE THAN DAVID SUGET.

    NICE VERSION OF THE CHRISTIE CLASSIC, BUT, FOR ME, THERE WILL NEVER BE A BETTER HERCULE THAN DAVID SUGET.

  • Jan 08, 2021

    Ustinov is good as Poirot but Finney was better in 1974. Typical Christie mystery with big -name ensemble cast.

    Ustinov is good as Poirot but Finney was better in 1974. Typical Christie mystery with big -name ensemble cast.

  • Jan 11, 2020

    As insipid a companion to Lumet's earlier and far more dynamic Agatha Christie adaptation as Niven's forgettable Colonel Rice is to Ustinov's spruce Poirot, the slow and formulaic mystery feels like a made-for-TV movie despite it's lengthy runtime.

    As insipid a companion to Lumet's earlier and far more dynamic Agatha Christie adaptation as Niven's forgettable Colonel Rice is to Ustinov's spruce Poirot, the slow and formulaic mystery feels like a made-for-TV movie despite it's lengthy runtime.

  • Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
    Sep 04, 2019

    Although the cast of recognizable name stars is noteworthy, that alone cannot save the desultory proceedings, so much so that how to stay awake is the mystery that'll involve most of your time. Mia Farrow does the heavy lifting, which should be all the warning astute film consumers should recognize.

    Although the cast of recognizable name stars is noteworthy, that alone cannot save the desultory proceedings, so much so that how to stay awake is the mystery that'll involve most of your time. Mia Farrow does the heavy lifting, which should be all the warning astute film consumers should recognize.

  • Jul 22, 2019

    Ya sale el remake el proximo año 2020

    Ya sale el remake el proximo año 2020

  • Jul 16, 2019

    That was kind of a trip. it wasn't bad..... I think for it's time it was probably pretty good, but we sure laughed at some absurdities.

    That was kind of a trip. it wasn't bad..... I think for it's time it was probably pretty good, but we sure laughed at some absurdities.

  • Feb 25, 2019

    It seems to be the unpopular opinion, but I actually liked this better than Murder on the Orient Express. Something about Orient Express just felt stuffy and closed off, and I didn't feel like I could "play along" the way I could with this one. Although the beginning seemed to drag a little, Once they got into the investigation it was very intriguing and fun to follow. Peter Ustinov does a great Poirot, and even though it's about a murder it still feels light and fun. Bette Davis and Angela Lansbury, among others, give great performances in this thrilling mystery film.

    It seems to be the unpopular opinion, but I actually liked this better than Murder on the Orient Express. Something about Orient Express just felt stuffy and closed off, and I didn't feel like I could "play along" the way I could with this one. Although the beginning seemed to drag a little, Once they got into the investigation it was very intriguing and fun to follow. Peter Ustinov does a great Poirot, and even though it's about a murder it still feels light and fun. Bette Davis and Angela Lansbury, among others, give great performances in this thrilling mystery film.

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    Alec B Super Reviewer
    Oct 28, 2018

    Adaptations of Christie work best when they embrace the inherent absurdity of the premise and just let us gawk at all the movie stars in exotic locals trying to murder each other instead of all the contrivances and plot holes.

    Adaptations of Christie work best when they embrace the inherent absurdity of the premise and just let us gawk at all the movie stars in exotic locals trying to murder each other instead of all the contrivances and plot holes.