mother! (2017) - Rotten Tomatoes

mother! (2017)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: There's no denying that mother! is the thought-provoking product of a singularly ambitious artistic vision, though it may be too unwieldy for mainstream tastes.

Tickets & Showtimes

mother! Videos

mother! Photos

Movie Info

A couple's relationship is tested when uninvited guests arrive at their home, disrupting their tranquil existence. From filmmaker Darren Aronofsky (Black Swan, Requiem for a Dream), mother! stars Jennifer Lawrence, Javier Bardem, Ed Harris and Michelle Pfeiffer in this riveting psychological thriller about love, devotion and sacrifice.

Watch it now

Cast

Domhnall Gleeson
as Oldest Son
Briain Gleeson
as Younger Brother
Jovan Adepo
as Cupbearer
Show More Cast

News & Interviews for mother!

Critic Reviews for mother!

All Critics (205) | Top Critics (39)

I hesitate to label it the "Worst movie of the year" when "Worst movie of the century" fits it even better.

September 18, 2017 | Rating: 0/4 | Full Review…

If you gave an extremely bright fifteen-year-old a bag of unfamiliar herbs to smoke, and forty million dollars or so to play with, "Mother!" would be the result.

September 18, 2017 | Full Review…

It's too bad it doesn't work.

September 16, 2017 | Rating: 2.5/4 | Full Review…

mother! is a film certain to be revered by some and reviled by others. And while I'd place myself mostly in the former camp, plenty of reasonable people will find themselves in the latter.

September 15, 2017 | Full Review…

If you're going to shake your fist at the heavens, you may as well do it with some style.

September 15, 2017 | Rating: 3/5 | Full Review…

What makes mother! brilliant is that it is open enough to read and project your own experiences onto it, which makes it deeply personal and universal.

September 15, 2017 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for mother!

½

I agree with those saying this is wrongly promoted as a thriller/horror. I also went into it not knowing a lot and I didn't expect the turns it took either (Honestly I have seen and liked this directors other films, but I had not even researched this enough to know this was one of his films. If I had, probably would have expected this). As it stands, it took me a while to realise some of the stuff happening was not literal (okay, the majority of it!). Once you know what you're dealing with, it is actually a pretty good film, but having said that, not everyone enjoys this style of movie either. I mostly liked it, it got way too dark and nasty at the end for me personally, and I don't think I'll be up for a repeat viewing, but I appreciate what they were going for.

Nicki Marie
Nicki Marie

Super Reviewer

Many people who did not like this movie don't seem to realize this is an allegory. They are only focused on the narcissistic man who drains his partners of all their love and spits them out for the next, younger model. "You don't love me. You just love that I love you," says mother. With the millions of dogs we discard each year in America, this behavior of eating up another being's effection without giving it back should be familiar to many. But the true story here is life on earth, represented as the house before, during, and after mankind's presence. Mother nature's husband is the creator, God. The Genesis story of man plays out from mother nature's perspective. In this house you will see Eden, the Apple, Adam, Eve, Cain and Able, the great flood, and other biblical events that are all symbols of human strife, human nature, and our values that tend to miss the forest for the trees at times. It is a warning of where we are going if we don't stop and pay attention to this house that provides us everything. This is what happens if we don't give love back.

Matthew Slaven
Matthew Slaven

Super Reviewer

Now I know why there weren't any promotional screenings for mother! in the lead-up to its national release. Director Darren Aronofsky's highly secretive movie starring Oscar-winners Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem was marketed as a horror thriller, a claim that is generous at best and dishonest at worst. This is not Rosemary's Baby by a long shot. It's a highly personal, livid, and visually audacious think piece on mankind, so it's no surprise that general audiences have hated it and graded it with the rare F rating on Cinemascore (a shaky artistic metric, granted, but still a dubious honor). Aronofsky is a polarizing filmmaker who routinely makes polarizing works of art, so the stupefied outrage is not surprising. mother! is a challenging film that demands your attention and deconstruction afterwards. It's not a passive movie going experience. I'm still turning things over in my brain, finding new links and symbols. mother! isn't for everyone or even many. It requires you to give into it and accept it on its own terms. If you can achieve that, I think there is enough to be gained through the overall experience. Lawrence and Bardem are husband and wife living out in the country. He's a poet going through serious writer's block and she's remodeling the house in anticipation of a future family. One day a stranger (Ed Harris) comes by looking for a place to stay, and Bardem invites him into his home. The stranger's wife (Michelle Pfeiffer) soon follows, looking for her husband. These uninvited guests awkwardly make themselves at home, testing Lawrence's politeness and the bonds of her marriage. More and more strangers follow, flocking to Bardem and the home, and their unpleasantness only grows, pushing Lawrence into further states of agitation, desperation, and shock. The first thing you need to know before sitting down to watch mother! is that it is one hundred percent metaphorical. Nothing on screen has a sole literal intention. The movie is clearly Aronofsky's statement about mankind's harmful tendencies, as well as a larger potential indictment, but this is a movie that exclusively traffics in metaphor. Accepting that early will make for a much better viewing experience. It took a solid thirty minutes for me to key into the central allegory, and once I understood that lens the movie became much more interesting (this was also the time that more unexpected visitors began complicating matters). I was taking every new piece of information from the mundane to the bizarre and looking to see how it fit into the larger picture. I would genuinely recommend understanding what the central allegory may be before watching the film. Looking back, I can appreciate the slower buildup that, at the time, felt a bit like an aimless slog awaiting some sense of momentum. Even the significant age difference between Bardem and Lawrence is addressed and has a purpose. mother! is the kind of movie that gets tarred with the title of "pretentious," and yeah, it is, because if you're devoting an entire two-hour movie to metaphor, then you're going to have to be a little pretentious. Terrence Malick movies feel like obtuse, pedantic navel-gazing, whereas mother! felt like a startling artistic statement that had a legitimate point and was barreling toward it with ferocity. It invited me to decode it while in action, keeping me actively alert. When dealing in the realm of metaphor, much is dependent upon the execution of the filmmaker, and Aronofsky is one of the best at executing a very artistic specific vision. Black Swan and Requiem for a Dream are both excellent examples of Aronofsky putting the viewer in the distressed mental space of the characters, utilizing every component of filmmaking to better communicate the interior downward spiral. With mother!, Aronofsky attaches his camera to Jennifer Lawrence for the entire movie; we are always circling her or facing her in close-ups, always in her orbit. She is our tether. When she walks out of a room, we follow, trying to listen to the conversations going on without us. When the revelers and mourners show up, we experience the same confusion, irritation, and more as her. The film builds in intensity as it careens toward its hallucinatory final act. It's here where Aronofsky unleashes his targeted condemnation with extreme vigor. It's one confusing moment cascading upon another, strange images that ripple like a nightmare. There are some pretty upsetting and offensive acts meant to provoke outrage, and Lawrence is always the recipient of much of the cruelty. Like a Lars von Trier film, Lawrence plays a heroine whose suffering serves as the film's thematic underpinning. Aronofsky's commitment to his vision is complete. He doesn't leave anything behind. Existing as a highly metaphorical work of art, there are numerous personal interpretations that can be had from mother! although, even with that said, one interpretation seems very obvious (spoilers to follow). This is first and foremost a biblical allegory with Bardem portraying God and with Lawrence as Mother Earth. They live by themselves in tranquility but God is bored and unable to find solace. That's when Ed Harris (Adam) and then Michelle Pfeiffer (Eve) show up, and all of God's attention is soaked up with these new people, who bring their warring sons (Cain and Abel) and then more and more strangers. The people won't listen to Mother Earth's requests and warnings, and after trashing her home and breaking a sink that causes an explosions of water (Aronofsky Noah meta reference?), she and God kick them all out. She says afterwards, "I'll get started on the apocalypse." It's Aronofsky's retelling of humanity's existence from a biblical perspective up until the fiery, vengeful end. From here there are all sorts of other symbols, from Jesus and the Last Supper, to the spread of the Gospels, and the corruption of God's Word and the subsequent cruelty of humanity. These newcomers are selfish, self-destructive, ignorant, and pervert the poet's message in different ways, caging women into sex slavery, brutally executing divided factions, all while God cannot help but soak up in their fawning adulation. God finally admits that Mother Earth just wasn't enough for him, like a spouse coming to terms with her husband's philandering. He's an artist that needs an audience or needy worshipers to feel personally fulfilled. Ultimately it all ends in fire and ash and a circular return to the dawn of creation. For viewers not casually versed in Biblical stories, the film will seem like an unchecked, unholy mess. This is going to be a very divisive movie that will enrage likely far more viewers than entice, and this result is baked into Aronofsky's approach from the start. Working in the realm of allegory doesn't mean the surface-level story has to be bereft of depth (Animal Farm, The Crucible, and Life of Pi are proof of that). However, Aronofsky's story just feels pretty uninviting on the surface, lacking stronger characterization because they are chiefly symbols rather than people. There are recognizable human behaviors and emotions but these are not intended to be recognizable people. This limits the creative heights of the film because the surface isn't given the same consideration as the metaphor. If you don't connect with the larger metaphor and its commentary, then you're going to be bored silly or overpowered by artistic indulgences. Everything is, ironically, a bit too literal-minded with its use of metaphor. The movie's cosmic perspective is, to put it mildly, very bleak. It can be very grueling to watch abuse after abuse hurled upon Lawrence, so it doesn't make for the most traditionally fun watch. mother! is a movie that is impossible to have a lukewarm reaction to. This is a shock to the system. Aronofsky's wild cry into the dark is a scorching cultural critique, a condemnation on the perils of celebrity and mob mentality, and a clear religious allegory that posits mankind as a swarm of self-destructive looters that are as ruinous as any swarm of Old Testament locusts. It's an ecological wake up call and a feminist horror story. It's an artistic cleave to the system that's meant to disrupt and inspire debate and discussion. This is going to be a movie that affects a multitude of people in different ways, but I feel confident in saying that fewer will connect with it and its dire message. Motherhood is viewed as martyrdom, and Pfeiffer's character sums it up best: "You give and you give and you give, and it's never enough." It's about dealing with one-sided, usury relationships, surrendering to the insatiable hunger of others who are without appreciation or introspection. It's not a horror movie like It is about scary clowns. It's a horror movie about how we treat one another and the planet. Aronofsky can confound just as easily as he can exhilarate. mother! is a provocative, invigorating, enraging, stimulating, and layered film that demands to be experienced and thoroughly digested. Nate's Grade: B+

Nate Zoebl
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

mother! Quotes

There are no approved quotes yet for this movie.

Discussion Forum

Discuss mother! on our Movie forum!

News & Features