The Rose Tattoo Reviews

  • Sep 03, 2020

    Not much here really. It;s not a bad movie, it's just that there are better films to invest two hours in.

    Not much here really. It;s not a bad movie, it's just that there are better films to invest two hours in.

  • Jul 21, 2020

    The script adaptation isn't great but the acting is strong.

    The script adaptation isn't great but the acting is strong.

  • Oct 09, 2019

    Love this movie and the performances. Ana Magniani was made for this role. Burt Lancaster was perfect as well. As I write this I'm sittimg in a Broadway theater watching the Broadway production of the Rose Tattoo with Marisa Tomei and it makes me want to run to see the movie once again. Marisa Tomei is no Ana Magniani. Watch the movie, Enjoy!!!

    Love this movie and the performances. Ana Magniani was made for this role. Burt Lancaster was perfect as well. As I write this I'm sittimg in a Broadway theater watching the Broadway production of the Rose Tattoo with Marisa Tomei and it makes me want to run to see the movie once again. Marisa Tomei is no Ana Magniani. Watch the movie, Enjoy!!!

  • Aug 01, 2019

    Great movie wonderful

    Great movie wonderful

  • Jul 15, 2019

    I have found that Tennessee Williams adaptations are hit or miss for me as I love Summer and Smoke (1961), Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) and A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) but I felt actively annoyed during Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) and this film. Part of that is the acting as Geraldine Page, the greatest actress of all time, is enough to buoy even the weakest screenplay while this film features Anna Magnani who is giving a performance tailored for the stage and Burt Lancaster who would mature into a good actor but seems to be struggling at this point. I don't think that this is Williams' best work and because this film is essentially a filmed play that means it's not very engaging and occasionally painful to watch. Italian seamstress Serafina Delle Rose, Anna Magnani, is widowed when her philandering husband Rosario, who has a giant rose tattoo on his chest, dies in a car accident. She grieves intensely and limits her libidinous young daughter Rosa, Marisa Pavan, from consummating her relationship with Jack Hunter, Ben Cooper. Her life is turned upside down when she discovers her husband's infidelity and meets the erratic Alvaro Mangiacavallo, Burt Lancaster, who quickly develops a romantic obsession with her. The two argue on their first date as she is overwhelmed by memories of her husband and confronts his mistress during their date. The next morning the two affirm their love for one another however as Delle Rose reconciles with her daughter and comes to terms with her grief. I have to admit that I was simply confused at several points in this film. A Streetcar Named Desire is successfully able to imply rape and prostitution while not explicitly referencing or showing anything. This film doesn't do that quite so successfully as it seems as though Alvaro has issues with alcoholism and also may be slightly mental, that may have just been Lancaster's portrayal, and yet the film wraps up as though he has no issues. The melodrama of Delle Rose's relationship with her dead husband is also not particularly interesting because we don't understand why she would have felt such a deep connection to him when we only see her kiss his back and tell him she loves him. I needed to understand what the various vices of the major love interest were and, crucially, I needed to care about these people and their relationships for this film to work. The issue may be in the direction because Daniel Mann also directed the abhorrent BUtterfield 8 (1960) and while this film is markedly better than that one it shares a lot of the same problems. This is the sort of material that clearly has an element of camp to it and yet Mann never seems to know this and treats the source material as though it is deathly serious sapping it of a lot of the fun that should be there while allowing for hammy performances. He also fails to stage the play in a way that is interesting or inspired as we might as well be watching people on the stage for all of the natural movement that they make. Sure we get a bit of variety in locations and Mann seems to be aware of the fact that having the characters leave the house gives the story some much needed room to breathe. Frankly I can see why Mann did not receive an Academy Award nomination for his direction and I can only hope that he produced a piece of work as good as his debut feature Come Back, Little Sheba (1952). The performers are also difficult to appreciate by today's standards because Magnani is doing far too much in her role and Lancaster seems fatally miscast. When watching Magnani perform I was reminded of Cher in Moonstruck (1987), in the negative sense, because she was so heavy with the accent and the hand gestures in every scene that it was hard to look past that and see any depth in her portrayal of the character. Personally, I would have awarded Best Actress to Eleanor Parker in Interrupted Melody (1955) over Magnani in this film. Lancaster is actually pretty awful as I was never sure of what he was going for, were we meant to believe he was so lovesick that he was making nonsensical decisions or was it meant to be darker and he was just mentally unstable? I feel as though the audience never finds out and that hurts a film that is meant to leave you in a chipper mood. In other words, this is not a film that's worthy of your time and I would suggest that you watch other Williams adaptations before seeing this film.

    I have found that Tennessee Williams adaptations are hit or miss for me as I love Summer and Smoke (1961), Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) and A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) but I felt actively annoyed during Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) and this film. Part of that is the acting as Geraldine Page, the greatest actress of all time, is enough to buoy even the weakest screenplay while this film features Anna Magnani who is giving a performance tailored for the stage and Burt Lancaster who would mature into a good actor but seems to be struggling at this point. I don't think that this is Williams' best work and because this film is essentially a filmed play that means it's not very engaging and occasionally painful to watch. Italian seamstress Serafina Delle Rose, Anna Magnani, is widowed when her philandering husband Rosario, who has a giant rose tattoo on his chest, dies in a car accident. She grieves intensely and limits her libidinous young daughter Rosa, Marisa Pavan, from consummating her relationship with Jack Hunter, Ben Cooper. Her life is turned upside down when she discovers her husband's infidelity and meets the erratic Alvaro Mangiacavallo, Burt Lancaster, who quickly develops a romantic obsession with her. The two argue on their first date as she is overwhelmed by memories of her husband and confronts his mistress during their date. The next morning the two affirm their love for one another however as Delle Rose reconciles with her daughter and comes to terms with her grief. I have to admit that I was simply confused at several points in this film. A Streetcar Named Desire is successfully able to imply rape and prostitution while not explicitly referencing or showing anything. This film doesn't do that quite so successfully as it seems as though Alvaro has issues with alcoholism and also may be slightly mental, that may have just been Lancaster's portrayal, and yet the film wraps up as though he has no issues. The melodrama of Delle Rose's relationship with her dead husband is also not particularly interesting because we don't understand why she would have felt such a deep connection to him when we only see her kiss his back and tell him she loves him. I needed to understand what the various vices of the major love interest were and, crucially, I needed to care about these people and their relationships for this film to work. The issue may be in the direction because Daniel Mann also directed the abhorrent BUtterfield 8 (1960) and while this film is markedly better than that one it shares a lot of the same problems. This is the sort of material that clearly has an element of camp to it and yet Mann never seems to know this and treats the source material as though it is deathly serious sapping it of a lot of the fun that should be there while allowing for hammy performances. He also fails to stage the play in a way that is interesting or inspired as we might as well be watching people on the stage for all of the natural movement that they make. Sure we get a bit of variety in locations and Mann seems to be aware of the fact that having the characters leave the house gives the story some much needed room to breathe. Frankly I can see why Mann did not receive an Academy Award nomination for his direction and I can only hope that he produced a piece of work as good as his debut feature Come Back, Little Sheba (1952). The performers are also difficult to appreciate by today's standards because Magnani is doing far too much in her role and Lancaster seems fatally miscast. When watching Magnani perform I was reminded of Cher in Moonstruck (1987), in the negative sense, because she was so heavy with the accent and the hand gestures in every scene that it was hard to look past that and see any depth in her portrayal of the character. Personally, I would have awarded Best Actress to Eleanor Parker in Interrupted Melody (1955) over Magnani in this film. Lancaster is actually pretty awful as I was never sure of what he was going for, were we meant to believe he was so lovesick that he was making nonsensical decisions or was it meant to be darker and he was just mentally unstable? I feel as though the audience never finds out and that hurts a film that is meant to leave you in a chipper mood. In other words, this is not a film that's worthy of your time and I would suggest that you watch other Williams adaptations before seeing this film.

  • Nov 10, 2017

    This is such a strange film. At first I thought it was a heavy drama with all these deep emotional things going on. But then there were moments of real levity, to the point that I was almost laughing out loud, but then it would get dark again. I found it tough to nail down the genre, and part of that was the performance of Anna Magnani. She plays the vast majority of this film very straight, so it’s hard to think of it as a comedy, even when Burt Lancaster is hamming it up in the same scene. She is going through some serious things in her life and she takes it out on everyone around her. I was starting to get very impatient with The Rose Tattoo, because everything centered around Magnani’s character and she is so unpleasant. There are also a lot of little subplots swirling around her. While they play into the main storyline either directly or indirectly, it takes some time before you can get your bearings and understand what story they want to tell. The entire film was a mixed bag for me, because at times I was enjoying it, then I’d be annoyed by it, and then I’d just be confused. It never had the kind of focus and direction that I wanted, so it didn’t impact me as powerfully as I think they intended. Still, I will admit that The Rose Tattoo has some strong performances and a few scenes that are enjoyable.

    This is such a strange film. At first I thought it was a heavy drama with all these deep emotional things going on. But then there were moments of real levity, to the point that I was almost laughing out loud, but then it would get dark again. I found it tough to nail down the genre, and part of that was the performance of Anna Magnani. She plays the vast majority of this film very straight, so it’s hard to think of it as a comedy, even when Burt Lancaster is hamming it up in the same scene. She is going through some serious things in her life and she takes it out on everyone around her. I was starting to get very impatient with The Rose Tattoo, because everything centered around Magnani’s character and she is so unpleasant. There are also a lot of little subplots swirling around her. While they play into the main storyline either directly or indirectly, it takes some time before you can get your bearings and understand what story they want to tell. The entire film was a mixed bag for me, because at times I was enjoying it, then I’d be annoyed by it, and then I’d just be confused. It never had the kind of focus and direction that I wanted, so it didn’t impact me as powerfully as I think they intended. Still, I will admit that The Rose Tattoo has some strong performances and a few scenes that are enjoyable.

  • Aug 18, 2017

    Anna Magnani is superb!!! But why is Burt Lancaster in this? That is the oddest bit of casting. Besides his body, he doesn't fit.

    Anna Magnani is superb!!! But why is Burt Lancaster in this? That is the oddest bit of casting. Besides his body, he doesn't fit.

  • Jul 16, 2017

    *** "EVERYBODY IS NOTHING UNTIL YOU LOVE THEM"... OSCAR WINNER MAGNANI IS A GEM***

    *** "EVERYBODY IS NOTHING UNTIL YOU LOVE THEM"... OSCAR WINNER MAGNANI IS A GEM***

  • May 01, 2016

    Absolutely horrible movie. Burt Lancaster should not have been cast in this role.

    Absolutely horrible movie. Burt Lancaster should not have been cast in this role.

  • Apr 18, 2015

    This is the screen adaptation of Tennessee Williams' namesake play which opened on Broadway in 1951, originally is tailor-made for Magnani, but she rejected it then due to her inadequate English expertise; four years later, she shoulders on this film version helmed by theatrical old hand Daniel Mann, which substantially lives up to everyone's expectation and is crowned as BEST LEADING ACTRESS in the Oscar competition, the film also earns two other wins for BEST ART DIRECTION and BEST BLACK & WHITE CINEMATOGRAPHY for the legendary Chinese-American cinematographer James Wong Howe out of a total 8 nominations. keep reading my review on my blog: http://wp.me/p1eXom-1S0, thanks

    This is the screen adaptation of Tennessee Williams' namesake play which opened on Broadway in 1951, originally is tailor-made for Magnani, but she rejected it then due to her inadequate English expertise; four years later, she shoulders on this film version helmed by theatrical old hand Daniel Mann, which substantially lives up to everyone's expectation and is crowned as BEST LEADING ACTRESS in the Oscar competition, the film also earns two other wins for BEST ART DIRECTION and BEST BLACK & WHITE CINEMATOGRAPHY for the legendary Chinese-American cinematographer James Wong Howe out of a total 8 nominations. keep reading my review on my blog: http://wp.me/p1eXom-1S0, thanks