Jeannette Catsoulis Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Jeannette Catsoulis

Jeannette Catsoulis
Jeannette Catsoulis's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
71% The Commune (Kollektivet) (2017) Sweeter and soapier than we've come to expect from the Danish director Thomas Vinterberg, "The Commune" swaddles the pain of a disintegrating marriage in a good-natured cocoon of laughter and larks.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
97% The Survivalist (2017) Impressively lean and rigidly controlled, "The Survivalist" achieves, at times, the primitive allure of a silent movie.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 17, 2017
40% Whisky Galore (2017) Beyond simple nostalgia ... the appeal of this limp retread is difficult to discern.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
67% The Wall (2017) The vein-popping mood is ultimately more exhausting than exciting.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
64% Paris Can Wait (Bonjour Anne) (2017) Little more than an indulgent wallow in gustatory privilege. By the time the final meal is devoured, you'll be wanting nothing so much as an antacid.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 10, 2017
52% The Dinner (2017) What we're left with is a morality play in which three deeply deplorable people - and one surprising white knight - wrestle with class privilege, mental illness and extremely silly food.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
71% Another Evil (2017) As quaint as the specters it works to expunge, "Another Evil" is an ultra-low-budget ghost story with an off-kilter sensibility that initially intrigues but ultimately fizzles.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
87% The Lovers (2017) Falling with a thud between two stools, it has neither the zip nor the zaniness of farce nor the airy vivacity of the best romantic comedies.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
72% Buster's Mal Heart (2017) If the story is too tricky to realize its themes or welcome the impatient, it also contains enough empathy to humanize a character who's part man, part spiritual symbol.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
88% A Dark Song (2017) Virtually a chamber piece with just two primary characters, the movie dives into the black arts with methodical restraint and escalating unease.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
21% Rupture (2017) Dreary, derivative and flat-out dopey, this dragged-out torture tale will disappoint even those whose hearts race whenever they see a female character strapped to a bed.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
100% Let It Fall: LA 1982-1992 (2017) Teeming with acts both heroic and reprehensible, John Ridley's wrenchingly humane documentary, "Let It Fall: Los Angeles 1982-1992," reveals the Los Angeles riots as the almost inevitable culmination of a decade of heightening racial tensions.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2017
48% The Promise (2017) Weighed down by the worthiness of its intentions, "The Promise" is a big, barren wartime romance that approaches the Armenian genocide with too much calculation and not nearly enough heat.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2017
93% Mimosas (2017) A movie that panders not at all to Western sensibilities, giving few pointers on a theme beyond the fortifying power of faith. For some viewers, that will be plenty.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
66% Tommy's Honour (2017) The performances are desultory, the musical score bullying and the drama - aside from the game-changing placement of inconvenient shrubbery - as predictable as Tom senior's steadily sprouting beard.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
89% Heal the Living (Réparer les vivants) (2017) In the background, Alexandre Desplat's swoony score piles on the sentiment, but it's all just empty calories; what this movie desperately needs is conflict.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
46% The Ticket (2017) There are some gnarly questions - of faith, love and self-worth, for starters - at the heart of "The Ticket," if only its makers had chosen to address them.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 6, 2017
57% i hate myself :) (2017) Ugly to look at and even uglier to listen to, Joanna Arnow's whiny documentary "i hate myself :)" plays like an especially brutal exercise in self-analysis.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2017
93% All This Panic (2017) Adopting a meandering, free-flowing structure and woozily intimate photography, the director, Jenny Gage, and her husband, the cinematographer Tom Betterton, follow close and listen well.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2017
73% The Blackcoat's Daughter (February) (2017) Yes, it's a horror movie (the murder scenes suggest that the director has watched "Psycho" more than once), but even its most brutal acts pulse with inchoate sadness.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2017
55% Here Alone (2017) Given the familiarity of its premise - a handful of survivors brave the aftermath of a deadly, rage-inducing virus - "Here Alone" is unexpectedly engaging.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2017
16% CHIPS (2017) A fascination with posteriors - both human and feline - isn't the worst thing about "CHIPS," but it's up there.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2017
95% Prevenge (2017) What hoists this bloody battiness above much of the scrappily low-budget horror pack is the smartness of its execution and the strength of the movie's central performance.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 22, 2017
90% A Woman, A Part (2017) Touching on issues of artistic survival and the porous boundary between work and pleasure, Ms. Subrin, an accomplished visual artist and filmmaker, sifts addiction, celebrity and the plight of the aging actress into something rarefied yet real.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2017
78% T2 Trainspotting (2017) While "T2" might be middle-aged, it's very far from moribund, the despondent base notes shouldering a story of revenge and regret, amity and acceptance.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2017
92% The Devil's Candy (2017) Mr. Byrne - relying almost entirely on a doom-metal soundtrack, game performers and a grungy palette of oily browns and moldy greens - somehow whips his ingredients into an improbably taut man-versus-Satan showdown.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2017
90% Raw (2017) An exceptionally classy-looking movie about deeply horrifying behavior.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2017
88% My Scientology Movie (2017) At times it plays like an extended skit on "The Daily Show"; yet its disorder also makes its insights - like how strongly the church's training sessions resemble acting classes - feel refreshingly organic.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2017
22% Table 19 (2017) Slapstick and sap vie for prominence in "Table 19," a comedy so lazy that it actually features someone falling off a log.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
No Score Yet Water & Power: A California Heist (2017) Guided by the work of a handful of burr-like journalists, this dense and disturbing documentary dives into the regulatory quagmire of California water rights with more courage than hope.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
73% Catfight (2017) Drawing its energy from revenge and its jagged humor from a black well of contempt for the wealthy, the movie fashions a world in which the only likable characters are the crazy and the doomed.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
10% Bitter Harvest (2017) The millions who died during this real-life tragedy deserve a stronger memorial than this one.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2017
88% My Name Is Emily (2017) Might just charm you into submission.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
93% Everybody Loves Somebody (2017) The setup is commonplace, but the scenery is delicious, the dialogue refreshingly tart and the keen supporting cast frisky or affecting, as the occasion demands.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
89% I Am Jane Doe (2017) "I Am Jane Doe" coalesces into a steamroller of pain that squashes our ability to see beyond its wounded families.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
90% John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) The lightness and winking quality that softened the slaughter are less evident in "John Wick: Chapter 2," an altogether more solemn affair weighed down by the philosophy that more is always more.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
91% Speed Sisters (2017) The movie's rough-and-tumble look works in its favor, and the occasional doldrums allow for reflection on the obstacles, military and otherwise, the women face daily.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
60% Sophie and the Rising Sun (2017) The gently nostalgic mood and sleepy pacing effectively erase the movie's necessary edge.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2017
0% Eloise (2017) A horror movie of such ineptitude that it invites sympathy for even its least gifted participants.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2017
45% Youth in Oregon (2017) A depressing slog that could have been so much more, "Youth in Oregon" suggests that loving someone gives us the right to override their decisions.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2017
76% The Daughter (2017) The characters don't have conversations so much as helpfully recite their back stories, and the long-buried secret is soon so obvious that the movie's last-act hysteria feels forced and a little ridiculous.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
95% Paris 05:59: Théo & Hugo (Théo et Hugo dans le même bateau) (2017) Light on plot yet heavy on chemistry, "Paris 05:59" is at times a little precious. But the two leads are so believably besotted that their occasional immaturity doesn't rankle.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
66% I Am Michael (2017) Mr. Franco broods and puzzles and vacillates. But he often seems abandoned by a director whose approach is so noncommittal and dramatically limp that it strands the actor, and his character, in a bland purgatory of conflicting motivations.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
57% Trespass Against Us (2017) Though thematically vague, thinly plotted and without a reliably sympathetic soul to cling to, the movie has a mutinous energy and an absurd, knockabout charm; even its violence is more quirky than brutal.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2017
43% xXx: Return of Xander Cage (2017) He still looks like a hard-boiled egg sitting on top of a fire hydrant.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2017
69% My Father, Die (2017) "My Father Die" is a trashy jewel. As with the Rubens painting of Saturn devouring one of his sons that punctuates certain scenes, you kind of can't stop looking at it.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2017
47% Alone in Berlin (2017) "Alone in Berlin" proceeds like a train crossing a plain. Without twists or turns, hills or valleys, its dramatic engine chugs reliably forward, delivering its cargo of World War II tragedy with bland efficiency.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2017
90% Ma (2017) Alternately sexy and silly, galvanic and gentle, "MA" is best enjoyed as a slide show of visual blessings and, sometimes, bafflements.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2017
4% Arsenal (2017) Despite solid acting (including John Cusack as a plainclothes detective), "Arsenal" is hobbled mainly by its director's histrionic tendencies.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 5, 2017
43% Between Us (2017) Stingingly attuned to the tension between long-term love and last-minute misgivings, "Between Us" makes a familiar situation feel remarkably fresh.‐ New York Times
Read More | Posted Jan 5, 2017