Brazil Reviews

  • 2d ago

    Brazil is a masterpiece that stands alongside Animal Farm and The Wall. Maybe not everybody will appreciate it, but if you do, it will resonate like nothing else. You will remember it. You will want other people to watch it so you can relate.

    Brazil is a masterpiece that stands alongside Animal Farm and The Wall. Maybe not everybody will appreciate it, but if you do, it will resonate like nothing else. You will remember it. You will want other people to watch it so you can relate.

  • Nov 24, 2020

    I can't begin to describe how amazing this film is. The cinematography alone is brilliant and brings the audience into the strange and yet somewhat familiar world almost immediately. The acting is perfect for the style of the movie, the casting is amazing, the story and plot are also amazing. The only thing I disliked about this movie is the somewhat sexist writing of the only main female character. This being said the movie itself is so great it would be unfair to give it less then five stars.

    I can't begin to describe how amazing this film is. The cinematography alone is brilliant and brings the audience into the strange and yet somewhat familiar world almost immediately. The acting is perfect for the style of the movie, the casting is amazing, the story and plot are also amazing. The only thing I disliked about this movie is the somewhat sexist writing of the only main female character. This being said the movie itself is so great it would be unfair to give it less then five stars.

  • Oct 29, 2020

    Beautiful to look at and think about, Brazil is a highly re-watchable masterpiece that made me a fan of bleak dystopian settings. In contrast, all wasteland-ish post apocalyptic movies should feel ashamed to not provide a hopeless and harsh world as unique and creative as Brazil for their characters to maneuver. The acting is great, as are the effects, the set-design and the writing. In terms of music the movie could have provided a few more memorable tunes. The most negative part are the heroic dream sequences where our main character Sam chases his mysterious love-interest. They are generally boring, uninspired and ugly, and a bad substitute for a real reason for Sam to be attracted to Jill. While it could be argued that they are a form of escapist day-dreaming, this could have been handled shorter and more entertaining in other ways. All in all a must-see movie that is hard to only watch once.

    Beautiful to look at and think about, Brazil is a highly re-watchable masterpiece that made me a fan of bleak dystopian settings. In contrast, all wasteland-ish post apocalyptic movies should feel ashamed to not provide a hopeless and harsh world as unique and creative as Brazil for their characters to maneuver. The acting is great, as are the effects, the set-design and the writing. In terms of music the movie could have provided a few more memorable tunes. The most negative part are the heroic dream sequences where our main character Sam chases his mysterious love-interest. They are generally boring, uninspired and ugly, and a bad substitute for a real reason for Sam to be attracted to Jill. While it could be argued that they are a form of escapist day-dreaming, this could have been handled shorter and more entertaining in other ways. All in all a must-see movie that is hard to only watch once.

  • Oct 07, 2020

    I think some movies become way overrated because they're so quirky that a lot of people want to rate it highly so that they can say they "get it" and think that makes them really open-minded and cultured or whatever. This is one of those films. Also, I'm not a fan of British "humor" so this really isn't for me anyway. But I just didn't find anything likeable about this one.

    I think some movies become way overrated because they're so quirky that a lot of people want to rate it highly so that they can say they "get it" and think that makes them really open-minded and cultured or whatever. This is one of those films. Also, I'm not a fan of British "humor" so this really isn't for me anyway. But I just didn't find anything likeable about this one.

  • Oct 04, 2020

    Very visually pleasing but the plot kinda made no sense.

    Very visually pleasing but the plot kinda made no sense.

  • Sep 30, 2020

    Brazil is a movie that I can admire for its creativity and surreal imagery yet not much else in terms of comedy, story, or characters. As a whole, the iconic sci-fi cult film is passable, just not really something I can get that into as much as The Truman Show or Back to the Future.

    Brazil is a movie that I can admire for its creativity and surreal imagery yet not much else in terms of comedy, story, or characters. As a whole, the iconic sci-fi cult film is passable, just not really something I can get that into as much as The Truman Show or Back to the Future.

  • Sep 04, 2020

    A bizarre and thrilling satire of politics and bureaucracy, that mainstream audiences may find difficult to understand or digest, but with its stunning production design, impressive set pieces, thought-provoking themes, dark humor, talented cast, inventive script, imaginative visuals and stylish direction, it's a dystopian sci-fi fantasy cult classic worth watching and analyzing, and undeniably Terry Gilliam's masterpiece.

    A bizarre and thrilling satire of politics and bureaucracy, that mainstream audiences may find difficult to understand or digest, but with its stunning production design, impressive set pieces, thought-provoking themes, dark humor, talented cast, inventive script, imaginative visuals and stylish direction, it's a dystopian sci-fi fantasy cult classic worth watching and analyzing, and undeniably Terry Gilliam's masterpiece.

  • Aug 29, 2020

    Great idea, but one of the strangest movies I've ever seen, where the whole world is run by a government bureaucracy. I also don't really care about any of the characters.

    Great idea, but one of the strangest movies I've ever seen, where the whole world is run by a government bureaucracy. I also don't really care about any of the characters.

  • Jul 19, 2020

    An imaginative, surreal, and sometimes funny imagining of Orwell's 1984. An interesting watch, but can feel too long at times.

    An imaginative, surreal, and sometimes funny imagining of Orwell's 1984. An interesting watch, but can feel too long at times.

  • Jul 04, 2020

    As Terry Gilliam finally taps into his more serious side, he makes one of the weirdest films I have ever seen, Brazil, and I flipping love it. While the film certainly has its funny points, I found interest in the deeper relevance to problems in the modern workplace. Now, that sounds like a lot for a little film like this, so I'll explain. I love Monty Python, to the point that I'm sure I have come close to memorizing the entirety of The Holy Grail. While Brazil is a completely different film, certain elements are similar, namely, the comedy. The humour in this is a perfect mix of visual and dialogue-based humour, which is something I feel is missing in cinemas currently. The setup of Brazil is bizarre, where a fly ends up in a typewriter causing a typo leading to the wrong person being charged of an extreme crime, one thing leads to another, and I'm still not quite sure what happened. However, it is clear that this film, intentionally or not, wanted to focus on the truth of the problems in the modern workplace. That's why the environment is so cluttered and stressed, the main character often day dreams, and the setting seems so familiar. However, all of this is covered by the dull and bland use of the camera. Almost every shot is the same, and that bothered me a little bit. None of the performances in this movie are particularly memorable either, with an exception being Michael Palin, because he's Michael Palin. Overall, if you find that watching movies to be confusing at times, definitely skip this one, it's my second watch of this, and I have a decent grasp, but too much of this movie goes right over your head the first time to truly be appreciated.

    As Terry Gilliam finally taps into his more serious side, he makes one of the weirdest films I have ever seen, Brazil, and I flipping love it. While the film certainly has its funny points, I found interest in the deeper relevance to problems in the modern workplace. Now, that sounds like a lot for a little film like this, so I'll explain. I love Monty Python, to the point that I'm sure I have come close to memorizing the entirety of The Holy Grail. While Brazil is a completely different film, certain elements are similar, namely, the comedy. The humour in this is a perfect mix of visual and dialogue-based humour, which is something I feel is missing in cinemas currently. The setup of Brazil is bizarre, where a fly ends up in a typewriter causing a typo leading to the wrong person being charged of an extreme crime, one thing leads to another, and I'm still not quite sure what happened. However, it is clear that this film, intentionally or not, wanted to focus on the truth of the problems in the modern workplace. That's why the environment is so cluttered and stressed, the main character often day dreams, and the setting seems so familiar. However, all of this is covered by the dull and bland use of the camera. Almost every shot is the same, and that bothered me a little bit. None of the performances in this movie are particularly memorable either, with an exception being Michael Palin, because he's Michael Palin. Overall, if you find that watching movies to be confusing at times, definitely skip this one, it's my second watch of this, and I have a decent grasp, but too much of this movie goes right over your head the first time to truly be appreciated.