The Hills Have Eyes Reviews

  • Jan 14, 2021

    Bland worse then remake

    Bland worse then remake

  • Jan 02, 2021

    Never have understood why the old fool started gunning it down the dirt road when the jets flew over. Horrible movie

    Never have understood why the old fool started gunning it down the dirt road when the jets flew over. Horrible movie

  • Dec 21, 2020

    Solid film although the remake is 10x better. Michael Berryman makes this movie so enjoyable too.

    Solid film although the remake is 10x better. Michael Berryman makes this movie so enjoyable too.

  • Dec 10, 2020

    Feels like Texas Chain but only if TCM wasn't good.

    Feels like Texas Chain but only if TCM wasn't good.

  • Dec 06, 2020

    It's amateurish camp, more funny than scary or disturbing.

    It's amateurish camp, more funny than scary or disturbing.

  • Nov 20, 2020

    Wes Craven's The Hills Have Eyes is one of the underrated horror classics of the 1970s. Shot on a small budget of $350,000 to $700,000 in Victorville, California. Craven displayed his directing talent early on. Not only is the cinematography and the direction great but the performances are believeable as well. Most low-budget horror films have bad acting in them, including John Carpenter's Halloween released a year later. These characters have chemistry with one another and you want to see them survive. The cannibals are memorable, most notably Michael Berryman (Pluto) and James Whitworth (Papa Jupiter). Many see Craven as a "Master of Horror" alongside John Carpenter and Tobe Hooper, The Hills Have Eyes, in my opinion, supports this nickname. P.S. I do have a soft spot for Wes Craven's films and he's one of my favorite horror directors. So this review is, of course, biased to some extent. But I truly loved this film.

    Wes Craven's The Hills Have Eyes is one of the underrated horror classics of the 1970s. Shot on a small budget of $350,000 to $700,000 in Victorville, California. Craven displayed his directing talent early on. Not only is the cinematography and the direction great but the performances are believeable as well. Most low-budget horror films have bad acting in them, including John Carpenter's Halloween released a year later. These characters have chemistry with one another and you want to see them survive. The cannibals are memorable, most notably Michael Berryman (Pluto) and James Whitworth (Papa Jupiter). Many see Craven as a "Master of Horror" alongside John Carpenter and Tobe Hooper, The Hills Have Eyes, in my opinion, supports this nickname. P.S. I do have a soft spot for Wes Craven's films and he's one of my favorite horror directors. So this review is, of course, biased to some extent. But I truly loved this film.

  • Oct 12, 2020

    I have mixed feelings about this one, at moments it felt really outdated, the stuck or trapped by "crazies/cannibals" has been explored over and over. There are some really good effects and editing to make it feel more impactful but also there are some moments in which the artificiality comes out and took me away of the experience. The face of Pluto makes an impact, great cast. There are some genuinely good moments of tension achieved by the use of sound mixing. I found truly interesting Craven's fascination with characters outwitting the bad guys in "Home Alone" style.

    I have mixed feelings about this one, at moments it felt really outdated, the stuck or trapped by "crazies/cannibals" has been explored over and over. There are some really good effects and editing to make it feel more impactful but also there are some moments in which the artificiality comes out and took me away of the experience. The face of Pluto makes an impact, great cast. There are some genuinely good moments of tension achieved by the use of sound mixing. I found truly interesting Craven's fascination with characters outwitting the bad guys in "Home Alone" style.

  • Jul 21, 2020

    There was a lot I liked about this film, but characters making dumb-ass decisions always gets to me, especially when it's one after the other. Hard to believe they went with that ending!!

    There was a lot I liked about this film, but characters making dumb-ass decisions always gets to me, especially when it's one after the other. Hard to believe they went with that ending!!

  • Jul 16, 2020

    Unpleasant but extremely effective.

    Unpleasant but extremely effective.

  • May 01, 2020

    The Hills Have Eyes is one of those horror movies, especially common in the 70s, that has its creepiness enhanced by its lack of quality. The budget was small, the picture is grainy, and there is little in the way of makeup and gore effects. Still, we are made to feel the characters' vulnerability, alone without security or experience in the middle of an ominous desert. Director Wes Craven uses wide shots of the family and their trailer surrounded by dust and rocky crags to enhance this effect, showing the travelers as victims through the binoculars of their hungry observers. The characters that form this average family aren't particularly memorable, with the exception of the dorky and annoying Doug Wood (Martin Speer), but the savage and unpredictable tribe of cannibals are unforgettably odd and cruel. Of the family of mutants, the simple-minded but no less evil Pluto is the obvious standout, played by Michael Berryman, a B movie actor in the vein of Rondo Hatton. Another peculiar character is Fred (John Steadman), the owner of a gas station near the cannibals' territory, who provides a backstory for the mutants, saying that the head of the clan was his murderous son. This is a classic example of over explanation in a horror movie. The creepiest things are what we don't know much about. The reason given for the family's excursion into the desert, to look for a mine they inherited, was also unusual and right from the start made the characters seem rather foolish. Obviously others noted these elements as strange because they were changed in the 2006 remake. The original ending is unsatisfactory as well: a poorly timed cut then a fade to red. It's an odd editing choice that doesn't give the viewer the closure they need after experiencing such a harrowing ordeal. The strongest aspect of the film are the travelers' dogs, Beauty and Beast, who foreshadow the danger and valiantly protect their family.

    The Hills Have Eyes is one of those horror movies, especially common in the 70s, that has its creepiness enhanced by its lack of quality. The budget was small, the picture is grainy, and there is little in the way of makeup and gore effects. Still, we are made to feel the characters' vulnerability, alone without security or experience in the middle of an ominous desert. Director Wes Craven uses wide shots of the family and their trailer surrounded by dust and rocky crags to enhance this effect, showing the travelers as victims through the binoculars of their hungry observers. The characters that form this average family aren't particularly memorable, with the exception of the dorky and annoying Doug Wood (Martin Speer), but the savage and unpredictable tribe of cannibals are unforgettably odd and cruel. Of the family of mutants, the simple-minded but no less evil Pluto is the obvious standout, played by Michael Berryman, a B movie actor in the vein of Rondo Hatton. Another peculiar character is Fred (John Steadman), the owner of a gas station near the cannibals' territory, who provides a backstory for the mutants, saying that the head of the clan was his murderous son. This is a classic example of over explanation in a horror movie. The creepiest things are what we don't know much about. The reason given for the family's excursion into the desert, to look for a mine they inherited, was also unusual and right from the start made the characters seem rather foolish. Obviously others noted these elements as strange because they were changed in the 2006 remake. The original ending is unsatisfactory as well: a poorly timed cut then a fade to red. It's an odd editing choice that doesn't give the viewer the closure they need after experiencing such a harrowing ordeal. The strongest aspect of the film are the travelers' dogs, Beauty and Beast, who foreshadow the danger and valiantly protect their family.