The Entertainer Reviews

  • Jul 19, 2020

    There is NOTHING that works in this mess.

    There is NOTHING that works in this mess.

  • Apr 06, 2020

    Fantastic cast to watch . Really enjoyed it all .

    Fantastic cast to watch . Really enjoyed it all .

  • May 24, 2019

    The decline of the British Empire in the world is exemplified through this film.

    The decline of the British Empire in the world is exemplified through this film.

  • May 27, 2018

    A beautiful performance by Olivier. The decline of British influence in teh world is modeled as a metaphor by the decline of a musichall performer.

    A beautiful performance by Olivier. The decline of British influence in teh world is modeled as a metaphor by the decline of a musichall performer.

  • Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
    Mar 31, 2018

    A standout entry, with early performances by nearly unrecognizable Joan Plowright, Albert Finney and Alan Bates, this concerns not only the gradual decline of one seedy and narcissistic performer (Larry Olivier chewing scenery with abandon), but also of an entertainment style (the English music hall) and perhaps of England herself, seen from the guts outward. A glorious kitchen sink production, grime-y and livid.

    A standout entry, with early performances by nearly unrecognizable Joan Plowright, Albert Finney and Alan Bates, this concerns not only the gradual decline of one seedy and narcissistic performer (Larry Olivier chewing scenery with abandon), but also of an entertainment style (the English music hall) and perhaps of England herself, seen from the guts outward. A glorious kitchen sink production, grime-y and livid.

  • Jan 09, 2018

    Absolutely mesmerising melodrama about a music hall entertainer of mediocre ability. Must have been very near the knuckle for its time. It has laughs, tears and a mesmerising and incredible performance from Laurence Olivier.

    Absolutely mesmerising melodrama about a music hall entertainer of mediocre ability. Must have been very near the knuckle for its time. It has laughs, tears and a mesmerising and incredible performance from Laurence Olivier.

  • Nov 15, 2016

    Laurence Olivier as The Entertainer of stage shows during the midst of WWII

    Laurence Olivier as The Entertainer of stage shows during the midst of WWII

  • Feb 14, 2016

    Tragically sad showing the futility of show business in Brighton, but very good nonetheless.

    Tragically sad showing the futility of show business in Brighton, but very good nonetheless.

  • Feb 13, 2016

    Falls flat for me on nearly all counts. Transfer from stage very awkward. Olivier plays well at times but it's not a consistent performance. Maybe it's the script that seems to jump about and plays for sentimentality. When Miriam Karlin comes on towards the end singing some song called When I'm With The Girls or something similar, I'd had enough. Why didn't Osborne just limit his theme a bit more instead of trying to fit in so many characters' stories? Streamlined a bit, the film may have worked. Sentimental family dramas laced with comedy are hard to pull off successfully. This one comes across as forced and false. Great to see Albert Finney and Alan Bates early in their careers looking very dashing. SPOILER ALERT I get uncomfortable when a script doesn't tie-up loose ends, in this case how did granddad Billy Rice find out about Archie's plans to divorce Phoebe? I don't care that Jean doesn't admit her part in it but I just wished Archie had pondered how his father knew of his (Archie's) scheme to marry the young beach beauty (WE know). And we don't see Billy doing this, just arriving to visit the parents and we only get their vehement reaction through a one-sided phone conversation with Archie. This glossing over of important parts of the plot happens again when Frank brings the news of Mike's death and despite her anguish for a large part of the film, we are not really shown the mother's full reaction to her son's death. It leaves the film missing an emotional core and I was left with only a distant feeling towards the characters.

    Falls flat for me on nearly all counts. Transfer from stage very awkward. Olivier plays well at times but it's not a consistent performance. Maybe it's the script that seems to jump about and plays for sentimentality. When Miriam Karlin comes on towards the end singing some song called When I'm With The Girls or something similar, I'd had enough. Why didn't Osborne just limit his theme a bit more instead of trying to fit in so many characters' stories? Streamlined a bit, the film may have worked. Sentimental family dramas laced with comedy are hard to pull off successfully. This one comes across as forced and false. Great to see Albert Finney and Alan Bates early in their careers looking very dashing. SPOILER ALERT I get uncomfortable when a script doesn't tie-up loose ends, in this case how did granddad Billy Rice find out about Archie's plans to divorce Phoebe? I don't care that Jean doesn't admit her part in it but I just wished Archie had pondered how his father knew of his (Archie's) scheme to marry the young beach beauty (WE know). And we don't see Billy doing this, just arriving to visit the parents and we only get their vehement reaction through a one-sided phone conversation with Archie. This glossing over of important parts of the plot happens again when Frank brings the news of Mike's death and despite her anguish for a large part of the film, we are not really shown the mother's full reaction to her son's death. It leaves the film missing an emotional core and I was left with only a distant feeling towards the characters.

  • Aug 15, 2013

    One of the great performances of the decade.

    One of the great performances of the decade.