A Field in England Reviews

  • May 20, 2019

    I don't get it.

    I don't get it.

  • Aug 22, 2018

    This is one of my favorite movies of all time. Don't get me wrong it is absolutely not for everyone but here's why it is genius. The story follows defectors from the English civil war who are coerced via the olde ale house ruse to dig for treasure while on mind altering fungi; the antagonist being an alchemist with close ties to the protagonist whose interactions seem to provide the films essential occultist themes of light vs dark. A large amount of the film's nuances are very abstract being related to historical and magical idioms that translate into a more nonobjective form of visual story telling. The shots in and of themselves are meticulously derived through tableau vivants accentuating the more obscure elements of character motives in this movie as well as conveying chapters to the narrative. Also the contrast of black and white adds much to the overwhelming hallucination sequences in the film; which are absolutely mind blowing. The acting is top notch lunacy and riddled with derisive gallows humor adding and alleviating to the surreal atmosphere of the film. One of the most notable attributes of the movie is the delirious score; comprised of flutes, drums, and authentic vocals the music really ties the whole film together. All in all A Field in England is a triumph in psychological horror using tasteful subtlety and aggressive surrealism it really wraps you into its psychotic anecdote. Ben Wheatley became a household name for me after this magnetic slice of psychedelia and has continued to make very promising progress in his career. If you are looking for a movie that is going to challenge your interpretative skills and warp your mind this is a must see.

    This is one of my favorite movies of all time. Don't get me wrong it is absolutely not for everyone but here's why it is genius. The story follows defectors from the English civil war who are coerced via the olde ale house ruse to dig for treasure while on mind altering fungi; the antagonist being an alchemist with close ties to the protagonist whose interactions seem to provide the films essential occultist themes of light vs dark. A large amount of the film's nuances are very abstract being related to historical and magical idioms that translate into a more nonobjective form of visual story telling. The shots in and of themselves are meticulously derived through tableau vivants accentuating the more obscure elements of character motives in this movie as well as conveying chapters to the narrative. Also the contrast of black and white adds much to the overwhelming hallucination sequences in the film; which are absolutely mind blowing. The acting is top notch lunacy and riddled with derisive gallows humor adding and alleviating to the surreal atmosphere of the film. One of the most notable attributes of the movie is the delirious score; comprised of flutes, drums, and authentic vocals the music really ties the whole film together. All in all A Field in England is a triumph in psychological horror using tasteful subtlety and aggressive surrealism it really wraps you into its psychotic anecdote. Ben Wheatley became a household name for me after this magnetic slice of psychedelia and has continued to make very promising progress in his career. If you are looking for a movie that is going to challenge your interpretative skills and warp your mind this is a must see.

  • May 21, 2018

    My intuition had told me before watching this movie that I would not like it - this time it was right, I didn't like the movie. Moreover, I truly believe that the director himself might have consumed some mushrooms before making this picture, figuratively speaking. I'm all for the flight of imagination and fantasy in making unique and original productions, but this particular case just doesn't work, at all. Furthermore, notwithstanding the many allusions which the director certainly had been trying to make in and by this movie, I had no interest whatsoever in attempting to decipher them; I felt very bored, even the humour was flat and insipid. Total waste of time.

    My intuition had told me before watching this movie that I would not like it - this time it was right, I didn't like the movie. Moreover, I truly believe that the director himself might have consumed some mushrooms before making this picture, figuratively speaking. I'm all for the flight of imagination and fantasy in making unique and original productions, but this particular case just doesn't work, at all. Furthermore, notwithstanding the many allusions which the director certainly had been trying to make in and by this movie, I had no interest whatsoever in attempting to decipher them; I felt very bored, even the humour was flat and insipid. Total waste of time.

  • Dec 30, 2017

    Didnt get it I guess.

    Didnt get it I guess.

  • Jan 04, 2017

    A truly wonderful civil war trip

    A truly wonderful civil war trip

  • Oct 06, 2016

    Absolutely shocking! It shows the true inhumanity of the human race.

    Absolutely shocking! It shows the true inhumanity of the human race.

  • Jul 26, 2016

    Not sure if this film is meant to b non-linear mushroom-fuelled nonsense or ant attempt at art

    Not sure if this film is meant to b non-linear mushroom-fuelled nonsense or ant attempt at art

  • Jens S Super Reviewer
    Jul 12, 2016

    Four men walk over a field in 17th century England, in black and white. What follows is weirdness. While some frames are really beautifully filmed, other parts are so trippy you think you're in a music video. Even though it's no long film, it sometimes feels like it, and yet there is an odd fascination for what's going on up until the bloody finale. You're left to make up your own mind about what all the fuzz was all about. The beautiful end credits song makes you think you've seen a much better film than it actually is. File under: artsy fartsy or What the hell did I just watch?

    Four men walk over a field in 17th century England, in black and white. What follows is weirdness. While some frames are really beautifully filmed, other parts are so trippy you think you're in a music video. Even though it's no long film, it sometimes feels like it, and yet there is an odd fascination for what's going on up until the bloody finale. You're left to make up your own mind about what all the fuzz was all about. The beautiful end credits song makes you think you've seen a much better film than it actually is. File under: artsy fartsy or What the hell did I just watch?

  • Jun 18, 2016

    A kaleidoscope of bumbling nonsense.

    A kaleidoscope of bumbling nonsense.

  • Jun 02, 2016

    3.4/5 Half of the film feels like pointless waste of material when all the creativity and wittiness are expressed towards the end of the film, almost as if director Ben Wheatley got two completely contrary inspirations for the tones of each half, making A Field In England an artistically rewarding film after a long wait of nothingness that goes unmatched to the tension of Kill List or to the black comedy of Sightseers and that probably wouldve worked more as a book as all the cinematic possibilities are wasted when theres nothing more to the tale than the tales of the poorly presented characters. Note: Probably makes more sense after a second viewing (Have not tried it yet)

    3.4/5 Half of the film feels like pointless waste of material when all the creativity and wittiness are expressed towards the end of the film, almost as if director Ben Wheatley got two completely contrary inspirations for the tones of each half, making A Field In England an artistically rewarding film after a long wait of nothingness that goes unmatched to the tension of Kill List or to the black comedy of Sightseers and that probably wouldve worked more as a book as all the cinematic possibilities are wasted when theres nothing more to the tale than the tales of the poorly presented characters. Note: Probably makes more sense after a second viewing (Have not tried it yet)