Belly Reviews

  • Jun 14, 2019

    One of the greatest movies ever made. It's just that simple.

    One of the greatest movies ever made. It's just that simple.

  • Dec 02, 2018

    This movie is one of the coolest movies I've ever seen.

    This movie is one of the coolest movies I've ever seen.

  • Oct 12, 2018

    I’m from the beast in the belly.

    I’m from the beast in the belly.

  • May 19, 2018

    Worst movie ever created. I will bring death to Hype Williams, Nas, and DMX.

    Worst movie ever created. I will bring death to Hype Williams, Nas, and DMX.

  • Apr 01, 2018

    most acting is average, maaaaybe sub-par depending on each individual. regardless, i felt the story had good intentions and was crafted from a good idea: but, i feel it was poorly executed due to many reasons. not sure if it has anything to do with specific people in production (ex: director, etc.) or if it is simply the acting. belly was a "background" movie as i like to call it. you put it on when you want something interesting but not THAT interesting, mainly while hanging out or cleaning or doing something to maintain most of your attention. the plot was hard to follow and seemed to almost not have an ending or conclusion. similar to when you are drunkenly rambling and end with "uh.. so... yeah"

    most acting is average, maaaaybe sub-par depending on each individual. regardless, i felt the story had good intentions and was crafted from a good idea: but, i feel it was poorly executed due to many reasons. not sure if it has anything to do with specific people in production (ex: director, etc.) or if it is simply the acting. belly was a "background" movie as i like to call it. you put it on when you want something interesting but not THAT interesting, mainly while hanging out or cleaning or doing something to maintain most of your attention. the plot was hard to follow and seemed to almost not have an ending or conclusion. similar to when you are drunkenly rambling and end with "uh.. so... yeah"

  • Jan 20, 2018

    This best gansta movie I have ever seen. The audience rating is right With this one. Shame on the tomato score...just shame on you!

    This best gansta movie I have ever seen. The audience rating is right With this one. Shame on the tomato score...just shame on you!

  • Jul 31, 2016

    surprisingly well acted and done with a cool style. great soundtrack too

    surprisingly well acted and done with a cool style. great soundtrack too

  • Feb 26, 2016

    NOTE: This film was recommended to me by YouTube user Kjo Schultz for "Steve Pulaski Sees It." Hype Williams' Belly follows the troubled escapades of two New York street criminals named Tommy (DMX) and Sincere (Nas), in addition to their partners in crime, as the gang spends their nights cracking cars and robbing nightclubs using little else other than brute force. This provides them with pocket money for the meantime; enough where Tommy can satisfy his girlfriend Keisha (Taral Hicks) and Sincere can take care of his girlfriend Tionne (Tionne "T-Boz" Watkins) and infant daughter. However, the big break for these gentleman comes at the turn of the 2000's, when heroin prices are escalating and the business is becoming a lucrative venture for anyone willing to take the risk. Tommy and Sincere go on to meet "Ox" (Louie Rankin), a heroin drug lord who wants to work with the men due to their promise. The perils of urban life soon take their toll on the men, in addition to greed and self-absorption, most of it resting on Sincere, who has to constantly battle the push and pull effect he gets with his business and his wife nearly every day. Belly is an interesting street-drama largely for its cinematography, and surprisingly not so much for its two leading male performers, two of the biggest names in hip-hop at the time. Rather than opting for flare with a constantly moving camera or canted angles similar to the Hughes Brothers' Menace II Society (this film also featured Tyrin Turner from that film in a small supporting performance, as well), Williams and cinematographer Malik Hassan Sayeed employ a wide variety of different ambiance and aesthetic warmth to the film. Consider the scene in a nightclub, where the blacklights make the characters "glow" blue in a strangely eerie, unsettling manner. Then consider one of the chase sequences in the film and how Williams employs very vivid, cleanly shot and paced car chases that help make a film that's mostly grounded in reality suspend disbelief for a few minutes in order to give you something completely different. There's more variety to Belly than I initially had predicted. The issue at hand is that there is so much going on in Belly that it's a shame character development suffers as a result. Granted, this particular drama doesn't have a liberal three hours to build up character relations, but it doesn't have the same hard-hitting punch and haunting, "urban jungle" vibes as a film like New Jack City did a few year prior. DMX and Nas do a fairly adequate job of conveying characters, but there's not a lot to them as people, which makes their performances, as well as their characters, stunted from any kind of significant growth. On an unrelated note, the soundtrack for Belly is what truly pushes it over and makes it a presence. Songs from Wu-Tang Clan, Method Man, and DMX himself populate a film that pulsates with life and adds to the noir-aesthetic Williams and Sayeed work to create. While it's unfortunate that Belly's lacking character development and rather subpar plot distract its loftier, more impressive elements, there's almost never too many urban films that depict some kind of dichotomy between playing by the rules and ripping the rulebook to shreds when you look at where it has gotten you. The film, in many ways, proudly showcases that. Starring: DMX, Nas, Taral Hicks, Tionne "T-Boz" Watkins, Louie Rankin, and Tyrin Turner. Directed by: Hype Williams.

    NOTE: This film was recommended to me by YouTube user Kjo Schultz for "Steve Pulaski Sees It." Hype Williams' Belly follows the troubled escapades of two New York street criminals named Tommy (DMX) and Sincere (Nas), in addition to their partners in crime, as the gang spends their nights cracking cars and robbing nightclubs using little else other than brute force. This provides them with pocket money for the meantime; enough where Tommy can satisfy his girlfriend Keisha (Taral Hicks) and Sincere can take care of his girlfriend Tionne (Tionne "T-Boz" Watkins) and infant daughter. However, the big break for these gentleman comes at the turn of the 2000's, when heroin prices are escalating and the business is becoming a lucrative venture for anyone willing to take the risk. Tommy and Sincere go on to meet "Ox" (Louie Rankin), a heroin drug lord who wants to work with the men due to their promise. The perils of urban life soon take their toll on the men, in addition to greed and self-absorption, most of it resting on Sincere, who has to constantly battle the push and pull effect he gets with his business and his wife nearly every day. Belly is an interesting street-drama largely for its cinematography, and surprisingly not so much for its two leading male performers, two of the biggest names in hip-hop at the time. Rather than opting for flare with a constantly moving camera or canted angles similar to the Hughes Brothers' Menace II Society (this film also featured Tyrin Turner from that film in a small supporting performance, as well), Williams and cinematographer Malik Hassan Sayeed employ a wide variety of different ambiance and aesthetic warmth to the film. Consider the scene in a nightclub, where the blacklights make the characters "glow" blue in a strangely eerie, unsettling manner. Then consider one of the chase sequences in the film and how Williams employs very vivid, cleanly shot and paced car chases that help make a film that's mostly grounded in reality suspend disbelief for a few minutes in order to give you something completely different. There's more variety to Belly than I initially had predicted. The issue at hand is that there is so much going on in Belly that it's a shame character development suffers as a result. Granted, this particular drama doesn't have a liberal three hours to build up character relations, but it doesn't have the same hard-hitting punch and haunting, "urban jungle" vibes as a film like New Jack City did a few year prior. DMX and Nas do a fairly adequate job of conveying characters, but there's not a lot to them as people, which makes their performances, as well as their characters, stunted from any kind of significant growth. On an unrelated note, the soundtrack for Belly is what truly pushes it over and makes it a presence. Songs from Wu-Tang Clan, Method Man, and DMX himself populate a film that pulsates with life and adds to the noir-aesthetic Williams and Sayeed work to create. While it's unfortunate that Belly's lacking character development and rather subpar plot distract its loftier, more impressive elements, there's almost never too many urban films that depict some kind of dichotomy between playing by the rules and ripping the rulebook to shreds when you look at where it has gotten you. The film, in many ways, proudly showcases that. Starring: DMX, Nas, Taral Hicks, Tionne "T-Boz" Watkins, Louie Rankin, and Tyrin Turner. Directed by: Hype Williams.

  • Dec 03, 2015

    This movie is an urban classic.

    This movie is an urban classic.

  • Sep 19, 2015

    idk maybe partial bias cuz i loved it so much in high school. Just watched it and it holds up still. Raw in pieces but the horrible rap acting is well put together by hype Williams.

    idk maybe partial bias cuz i loved it so much in high school. Just watched it and it holds up still. Raw in pieces but the horrible rap acting is well put together by hype Williams.