The Big Chill Reviews

  • Jan 05, 2021

    "Big Chill" is a pointless movie that gets stuck in a wasteland. The characters have great memories of something but it's not clear what they remember and they seem to be on the road to nothing-in-particular. "Jonah Who Will be 25 in the Year 2000" is a better movie. The "Jonah" characters are baby boomers, and they're aging and a bit nostalgic, and they're interesting. Who do you want to meet?

    "Big Chill" is a pointless movie that gets stuck in a wasteland. The characters have great memories of something but it's not clear what they remember and they seem to be on the road to nothing-in-particular. "Jonah Who Will be 25 in the Year 2000" is a better movie. The "Jonah" characters are baby boomers, and they're aging and a bit nostalgic, and they're interesting. Who do you want to meet?

  • Jan 03, 2021

    Great ensemble cast. It makes you wish you could get all of your old friends together. William Hurt stands out.

    Great ensemble cast. It makes you wish you could get all of your old friends together. William Hurt stands out.

  • Jul 19, 2020

    A well-crafted account of an empty, regretful, promiscuous and soulless generation with "lost hope" and despair that evolved into nothing of significance to offer anyone except colorful sneakers, hollow journalism, clumsy television heroes and choice weed.

    A well-crafted account of an empty, regretful, promiscuous and soulless generation with "lost hope" and despair that evolved into nothing of significance to offer anyone except colorful sneakers, hollow journalism, clumsy television heroes and choice weed.

  • Jul 14, 2020

    I didn't end up caring for any of the characters.

    I didn't end up caring for any of the characters.

  • Jun 30, 2020

    A great ensemble cast and the only thing really memorable about it is how Meg Tilly stretches out so beautifully.

    A great ensemble cast and the only thing really memorable about it is how Meg Tilly stretches out so beautifully.

  • Jun 21, 2020

    I'm trying to go back and watch movies that are highly rated that I've missed. Today that movie was "The Big Chill". It was just average in my opinion. It has quite a cast, but the story is Meh. I did enjoy the movie, I was just hoping for something better. The story is very basic. A bunch of old friends are reunited due to one of them dying. They look back at their lives throughout the movie. Not much happens.

    I'm trying to go back and watch movies that are highly rated that I've missed. Today that movie was "The Big Chill". It was just average in my opinion. It has quite a cast, but the story is Meh. I did enjoy the movie, I was just hoping for something better. The story is very basic. A bunch of old friends are reunited due to one of them dying. They look back at their lives throughout the movie. Not much happens.

  • May 11, 2020

    An interesting look at mini reunion between friends 15 years later and how their lives and perceptions have changed. Worth a watch.

    An interesting look at mini reunion between friends 15 years later and how their lives and perceptions have changed. Worth a watch.

  • Feb 21, 2020

    An incestuous group of college friends reunite 15 years or so later under the worst of circumstances — one of their own had taken his own life — and spend the weekend together in a gorgeous South Carolina mansion. How much they have all stayed in touch isn't always clear while others never lost touch and married one another. Like many ensemble-cast films, the characters typically represent archetypes or stereotypes of the culture. In this case, these baby boomers have jettisoned their lives as anti-establishment revolutionaries in the late 60s (a decade they still don't shut up about) into a wide range of very much establishment professions. The gigantic, Southern (possibly one-time plantation) summer home where 90% of the film takes place is a symbol of that turn, probably. In fact, Harold (Kevin Kline) and Sarah (Glenn Close), the owners of the home, had let Alex (was supposed to be Kevin Costner in flashbacks, but those were cut, so I've learned), the only one of the gang who had stuck with their morals by working a sundry assortment of social work jobs, stay in the house and was the location where the suicide took place. Jeff Goldblum as Michael has many excellent Jeff Goldblumisms. Nick (William Hurt) had the best overall performance as the sardonic, once radio host and forever Vietnam War veteran. To sum up Nick's sense of humor in one line, when Meg (Mary Kay Place) said she had yelled at Alex the final time they spoke, Nick responded: "That's probably why he killed himself." While we know that Nick is obviously troubled by his time in the war, we get no details about his motives, until Harold insinuates that he signed up "for a new experience". This bugged the crap outta me, as these were supposed to be late-60s college students who were vehemently anti-war. To say one of them signed up for this boondoggle for a "new experience" just didn't feel realistic. And that ending. W…T…F?? While Meg considers, to varying degrees, each male as a potential father to her unborn child like early 80s Bumble, she eventually sleeps with (the very happily married) Harold because Harold's wife, Sarah, feels for Meg's aging uterus and sees that her friend and husband have a good connection — they did smash in college after all. The lack of foresight amongst this group of otherwise very practical, highly educated and successful, trio was shocking and knocked the score from, like, a (78) to a (71). But if you can just forget that last part, it's a much more enjoyable film with a great soundtrack.

    An incestuous group of college friends reunite 15 years or so later under the worst of circumstances — one of their own had taken his own life — and spend the weekend together in a gorgeous South Carolina mansion. How much they have all stayed in touch isn't always clear while others never lost touch and married one another. Like many ensemble-cast films, the characters typically represent archetypes or stereotypes of the culture. In this case, these baby boomers have jettisoned their lives as anti-establishment revolutionaries in the late 60s (a decade they still don't shut up about) into a wide range of very much establishment professions. The gigantic, Southern (possibly one-time plantation) summer home where 90% of the film takes place is a symbol of that turn, probably. In fact, Harold (Kevin Kline) and Sarah (Glenn Close), the owners of the home, had let Alex (was supposed to be Kevin Costner in flashbacks, but those were cut, so I've learned), the only one of the gang who had stuck with their morals by working a sundry assortment of social work jobs, stay in the house and was the location where the suicide took place. Jeff Goldblum as Michael has many excellent Jeff Goldblumisms. Nick (William Hurt) had the best overall performance as the sardonic, once radio host and forever Vietnam War veteran. To sum up Nick's sense of humor in one line, when Meg (Mary Kay Place) said she had yelled at Alex the final time they spoke, Nick responded: "That's probably why he killed himself." While we know that Nick is obviously troubled by his time in the war, we get no details about his motives, until Harold insinuates that he signed up "for a new experience". This bugged the crap outta me, as these were supposed to be late-60s college students who were vehemently anti-war. To say one of them signed up for this boondoggle for a "new experience" just didn't feel realistic. And that ending. W…T…F?? While Meg considers, to varying degrees, each male as a potential father to her unborn child like early 80s Bumble, she eventually sleeps with (the very happily married) Harold because Harold's wife, Sarah, feels for Meg's aging uterus and sees that her friend and husband have a good connection — they did smash in college after all. The lack of foresight amongst this group of otherwise very practical, highly educated and successful, trio was shocking and knocked the score from, like, a (78) to a (71). But if you can just forget that last part, it's a much more enjoyable film with a great soundtrack.

  • Aug 01, 2019

    This is not a film that I would call good per se but it is very entertaining despite all of it's easily recognizable flaws and I value that now having recently seen a lot of films that aim to be entertaining that never hit the mark. Very much of it's time the film's cast, visual style and the issues it references may not appeal to young audiences today who do not have a frame of reference for the dialogue but the pure 1980s-ness of the film should be enough to get it by in the era of Stranger Things. I wouldn't call this film one of the best of 1983 when considering that Terms of Endearment (1983) and The Right Stuff (1983) were also released but I can confirm that I will certainly watch this film again. Seven individuals who were friends when they attended the University of Michigan but have since drifted apart come back together after the suicide of their friend Alex, Kevin Costner. Sarah Cooper, Glenn Close, appears responsible and put together but is revealed to be distraught over the death and to have had a past affair with Alex while her husband Harold, Kevin Kline, reminisces about the issues of the past. Television star Sam Weber, Tom Berenger, is embarrassed over the low quality of his work and saddened by his lack of connection with his daughter and ex-wife. He begins an affair with the married Karen Bowens, JoBeth Williams, with whom he had a past flirtation that has ignited interest in her due to her lack of interest in her good but boring husband. Materialistic reporter Michael Gold, Jeff Goldblum, clashes with Vietnam war veteran and former shock jock radio host Nick Carlton, William Hurt, who has become pretentious and depressed. Carlton falls in love with the younger girlfriend of Alex, Chloe, Meg Tilly, with whom he bonds because of the comfort he offered her through his radio show. Finally, Meg Jones, Mary Kay Place, has decided she desperately wants a child and tries to proposition every man in the group until Cooper allows her to sleep with Harold. The friends go their separate ways at the end of their time together having not changed very much. The fun in the film comes from the interactions between the zany characters as we get comedy, drama and a decent serving romance acted out by some of the finest thespians working in 1983. My favorite of the many different plotlines was that which followed the difficult relationship between Weber and Bowens. Their relationship wasn't prevented from beginning by ridiculous concerns such as societal pressures in the early 1980s but simply the past experiences of Weber in relation to divorce and his desire to see Bowens not get hurt. We do get a very fun, very 1980s sex scene between the two of them that is everything you want and need it to be but when they go their separate ways the next morning we know that they have taken something important away from this experience and will be able to remain friends. Sure, some of the storylines drag as despite the manic energy of Goldblum the concerns of Gold weren't particularly funny or interesting after a while. The performances in the film do benefit it hugely as well as it is hard to go wrong with talent like Glenn Close, Kevin Kline and William Hurt on hand. Close gets to give a performance of great contrasts as we see her putting together a huge feast for the group with a big grimace plastered to her face before cutting to her vulnerable and crying in the shower. She is equally wonderful at playing both sides of the character and we can see how Cooper exists as both of these people at once. Each of the actors excel at comedy but Place in particular stands out during one hilarious scene in which she describes to Cooper how she wants to get impregnated and runs down all of the different ways in which she has been rejected in the past. I am in some ways surprised that this film didn't get nominated for more awards in the acting categories but seeing as how 1983 was such a strong year you can't really begrudge the Academy. Again, not an amazing film, there are a few too many random placements of pop songs to fill in for a lack of interesting dialogue, but one deserving of a viewing if only for how much pleasure it brings to an audience member.

    This is not a film that I would call good per se but it is very entertaining despite all of it's easily recognizable flaws and I value that now having recently seen a lot of films that aim to be entertaining that never hit the mark. Very much of it's time the film's cast, visual style and the issues it references may not appeal to young audiences today who do not have a frame of reference for the dialogue but the pure 1980s-ness of the film should be enough to get it by in the era of Stranger Things. I wouldn't call this film one of the best of 1983 when considering that Terms of Endearment (1983) and The Right Stuff (1983) were also released but I can confirm that I will certainly watch this film again. Seven individuals who were friends when they attended the University of Michigan but have since drifted apart come back together after the suicide of their friend Alex, Kevin Costner. Sarah Cooper, Glenn Close, appears responsible and put together but is revealed to be distraught over the death and to have had a past affair with Alex while her husband Harold, Kevin Kline, reminisces about the issues of the past. Television star Sam Weber, Tom Berenger, is embarrassed over the low quality of his work and saddened by his lack of connection with his daughter and ex-wife. He begins an affair with the married Karen Bowens, JoBeth Williams, with whom he had a past flirtation that has ignited interest in her due to her lack of interest in her good but boring husband. Materialistic reporter Michael Gold, Jeff Goldblum, clashes with Vietnam war veteran and former shock jock radio host Nick Carlton, William Hurt, who has become pretentious and depressed. Carlton falls in love with the younger girlfriend of Alex, Chloe, Meg Tilly, with whom he bonds because of the comfort he offered her through his radio show. Finally, Meg Jones, Mary Kay Place, has decided she desperately wants a child and tries to proposition every man in the group until Cooper allows her to sleep with Harold. The friends go their separate ways at the end of their time together having not changed very much. The fun in the film comes from the interactions between the zany characters as we get comedy, drama and a decent serving romance acted out by some of the finest thespians working in 1983. My favorite of the many different plotlines was that which followed the difficult relationship between Weber and Bowens. Their relationship wasn't prevented from beginning by ridiculous concerns such as societal pressures in the early 1980s but simply the past experiences of Weber in relation to divorce and his desire to see Bowens not get hurt. We do get a very fun, very 1980s sex scene between the two of them that is everything you want and need it to be but when they go their separate ways the next morning we know that they have taken something important away from this experience and will be able to remain friends. Sure, some of the storylines drag as despite the manic energy of Goldblum the concerns of Gold weren't particularly funny or interesting after a while. The performances in the film do benefit it hugely as well as it is hard to go wrong with talent like Glenn Close, Kevin Kline and William Hurt on hand. Close gets to give a performance of great contrasts as we see her putting together a huge feast for the group with a big grimace plastered to her face before cutting to her vulnerable and crying in the shower. She is equally wonderful at playing both sides of the character and we can see how Cooper exists as both of these people at once. Each of the actors excel at comedy but Place in particular stands out during one hilarious scene in which she describes to Cooper how she wants to get impregnated and runs down all of the different ways in which she has been rejected in the past. I am in some ways surprised that this film didn't get nominated for more awards in the acting categories but seeing as how 1983 was such a strong year you can't really begrudge the Academy. Again, not an amazing film, there are a few too many random placements of pop songs to fill in for a lack of interesting dialogue, but one deserving of a viewing if only for how much pleasure it brings to an audience member.

  • May 16, 2019

    it was a great movie.great performance.one of my favorite movie of the year

    it was a great movie.great performance.one of my favorite movie of the year