Funny Girl Reviews

  • Feb 08, 2021

    Unfortunately there are a lot of plot holes and anachronisms - for a show thought to be set in the early 1900s, it looked very 1960s. Sure Barbra Streisand is a great singer. But so many characters in this movie act without any logic which can only be described as lazy writing. For example, Fanny gets married, has a child - and is suddenly back on stage, making mountains of money. There is no explanation how and why the wife of a wealthy man around 1910 would be doing this - especially after having abandoned her group in the middle of a tour. I was rather disappointed in the execution of this film.

    Unfortunately there are a lot of plot holes and anachronisms - for a show thought to be set in the early 1900s, it looked very 1960s. Sure Barbra Streisand is a great singer. But so many characters in this movie act without any logic which can only be described as lazy writing. For example, Fanny gets married, has a child - and is suddenly back on stage, making mountains of money. There is no explanation how and why the wife of a wealthy man around 1910 would be doing this - especially after having abandoned her group in the middle of a tour. I was rather disappointed in the execution of this film.

  • Nov 11, 2020

    One of the better musicals, Funny Girl features Barbra Streisand's greatest performance of her career.

    One of the better musicals, Funny Girl features Barbra Streisand's greatest performance of her career.

  • Sep 29, 2020

    It's funny, I understand why people like this movie, but it's not one of my favorites. Fanny Brice, played by Barbara Streisand, is entertaining on the screen, but if I had to deal with someone as exasperating as her in real life, it would be miserable. And apparently Streisand and Brice share some common attributes in this regard, according to the filmmakers. I don't mean to rain on anybody's parade, but Funny Girl is a mediocre musical.

    It's funny, I understand why people like this movie, but it's not one of my favorites. Fanny Brice, played by Barbara Streisand, is entertaining on the screen, but if I had to deal with someone as exasperating as her in real life, it would be miserable. And apparently Streisand and Brice share some common attributes in this regard, according to the filmmakers. I don't mean to rain on anybody's parade, but Funny Girl is a mediocre musical.

  • Jul 29, 2020

    Great movie, but I don't get Omar Sharif as Nicky Arnstein.

    Great movie, but I don't get Omar Sharif as Nicky Arnstein.

  • Jul 17, 2020

    Not one single thing worked for me in this mess of a musical.

    Not one single thing worked for me in this mess of a musical.

  • Mar 10, 2020

    The musical that gave us Barbara Streisand, Funny Girl is well worth the watch for its handful of bangers and turn-of-the-century banter. "Hello, Gorgeous" is still one of the best opening lines to present us with a character, especially when Streisand is not the typical Hollywood beauty — a point that her friends and family state throughout the film (even though, given the time, the focus was on Broadway, not Hollywood). Fanny (Streisand) as the titular funny girl, shocks and delights audiences with a surprise pregnancy (by stuffing a pillow inside of her wedding dress) and other antics that lampooned the theater-going crowd for the times — of course, Streisand is perfect for this. Omar Sharif (who my mom always considered to be the most handsome man in Hollywood) as Nicky Arnstein with an unidentifiable accent, but "foreign" nevertheless, is the perfect suave and sophisticated counterpart to Fanny. "Don't Rain on My Parade" and "My Man" are the two best tracks from the film, the latter of which Streisand absolutely crushes to send us out clapping.

    The musical that gave us Barbara Streisand, Funny Girl is well worth the watch for its handful of bangers and turn-of-the-century banter. "Hello, Gorgeous" is still one of the best opening lines to present us with a character, especially when Streisand is not the typical Hollywood beauty — a point that her friends and family state throughout the film (even though, given the time, the focus was on Broadway, not Hollywood). Fanny (Streisand) as the titular funny girl, shocks and delights audiences with a surprise pregnancy (by stuffing a pillow inside of her wedding dress) and other antics that lampooned the theater-going crowd for the times — of course, Streisand is perfect for this. Omar Sharif (who my mom always considered to be the most handsome man in Hollywood) as Nicky Arnstein with an unidentifiable accent, but "foreign" nevertheless, is the perfect suave and sophisticated counterpart to Fanny. "Don't Rain on My Parade" and "My Man" are the two best tracks from the film, the latter of which Streisand absolutely crushes to send us out clapping.

  • Feb 06, 2020

    Funny Girl (1968) Some of the best parts are the comedy like being pregnant or the roller skates scenes. I like the sets, costumes in this film. I liked that that this was not a typical musical and there was not as much music as many musicals. There are enjoyable things to see such as the gamboling scenes, the family dynamic with a Jewish family. I wish that this film had focused more on the relationship with the daughter and what being Jewish meant in this community.

    Funny Girl (1968) Some of the best parts are the comedy like being pregnant or the roller skates scenes. I like the sets, costumes in this film. I liked that that this was not a typical musical and there was not as much music as many musicals. There are enjoyable things to see such as the gamboling scenes, the family dynamic with a Jewish family. I wish that this film had focused more on the relationship with the daughter and what being Jewish meant in this community.

  • Aug 25, 2019

    This would Never be rated G today due to the "bridal" scene with barely-dressed women parading around for several minutes. Totally inappropriate objectification of women for a G-rated movie.

    This would Never be rated G today due to the "bridal" scene with barely-dressed women parading around for several minutes. Totally inappropriate objectification of women for a G-rated movie.

  • Jul 19, 2019

    This is the first film I have seen since Stripes (1981) that manages to have an entertaining, glorious first half and a second half that completely drags and is ultimately forgettable. Barbra Streisand is undoubtedly the best part of this film as she outshines all who surround her but is also let down by a weak screenplay and a poorly paced film. I usually enjoy the work of William Wyler with The Heiress (1949) and The Little Foxes (1941) being among my favorites of his but here he doesn't seem to know what he is doing with this film as he spends too much time on details that are not interesting instead of providing us with more fabulous dance numbers. I would suggest that you watch the first 100 minutes of this film and then turn it off as the film begins to prioritize the romance over her career progression. Unattractive but talented young performer Fanny Brice, Barbra Streisand, is desperate to become a part of the ‘Ziegfeld Follies' but flunks her audition attracting the ire of her bosses. She is later able to prove herself to be a talent with her humor and singing ability and is hired by the fearsome Florenz Ziegfeld, Walter Pidgeon, who she stands up to with the help of handsome gambler Nicky Arnstein, Omar Sharif. She strikes up a tentative romance with him following their meeting as her career skyrockets but he refuses to show commitment and will often disappear for long period of time with no explanation. The two eventually reunite and then quickly marry as she puts her career on hold to be with him. He becomes disgruntled with married life as he begins losing money while gambling and engaging in shady deals as his wife becomes successful as she returns to her career and financially supports them and their children. The two eventually break up when she realizes she is strong enough to stand on her own and does not need him for emotional support. Streisand is giving a definitive movie star performance here as she radiates charisma from every pore, looks fabulous at all times and knocks you out with her singing and dancing. She is alive with passion in this film as she sells at every moment on the idea that Brice is a unique talent that would have been beloved both then and now. I had a great deal of fun with the scenes in which Streisand humorously roller skates around a stage while performing stand up and singing in addition to appreciating how Streisand carries herself in the few scenes with her mother. Despite how wonderful I think she is I would not have given either her or Katharine Hepburn the Academy Award for Best Actress but would have instead rewarded Joanne Woodward for her spellbinding performance in Rachel, Rachel (1968). The rest of the film is difficult to praise as the story focuses on entirely the wrong aspects while enticing us with the sight of what could be interesting subplots. I found the tortured love story between Brice and Arnstein to be terrifically dull and tedious to watch as it extended the film beyond the tight 100 minutes it should have been and doesn't provide us with any real juicy drama. Part of this is how little Sharif brings to the role as he is completely outshone by his leading lady and we never understand why this dazzling woman would be so dependent on such a nothing character. What I wanted to see more of were the musical numbers as the ballet and the triumphant performance of "My Man" at the end of the film were sights to behold. I also wanted to see more of the delightfully witty Kay Medford who is a hoot as Brice's sassy mother Rose who can elicit laughter simply through saying the word "Ruffles" in a way that leaves you with no doubt as to what the double entendre means. I am saddened that this film, which could have been great, loses itself so completely in it's second half and prevents itself from being as brilliant as Singin' in the Rain (1952) or The Sound of Music (1965). Still worth it for Streisand's performance and the exciting musical numbers but equally worth turning off after the film begins to lose it's way.

    This is the first film I have seen since Stripes (1981) that manages to have an entertaining, glorious first half and a second half that completely drags and is ultimately forgettable. Barbra Streisand is undoubtedly the best part of this film as she outshines all who surround her but is also let down by a weak screenplay and a poorly paced film. I usually enjoy the work of William Wyler with The Heiress (1949) and The Little Foxes (1941) being among my favorites of his but here he doesn't seem to know what he is doing with this film as he spends too much time on details that are not interesting instead of providing us with more fabulous dance numbers. I would suggest that you watch the first 100 minutes of this film and then turn it off as the film begins to prioritize the romance over her career progression. Unattractive but talented young performer Fanny Brice, Barbra Streisand, is desperate to become a part of the ‘Ziegfeld Follies' but flunks her audition attracting the ire of her bosses. She is later able to prove herself to be a talent with her humor and singing ability and is hired by the fearsome Florenz Ziegfeld, Walter Pidgeon, who she stands up to with the help of handsome gambler Nicky Arnstein, Omar Sharif. She strikes up a tentative romance with him following their meeting as her career skyrockets but he refuses to show commitment and will often disappear for long period of time with no explanation. The two eventually reunite and then quickly marry as she puts her career on hold to be with him. He becomes disgruntled with married life as he begins losing money while gambling and engaging in shady deals as his wife becomes successful as she returns to her career and financially supports them and their children. The two eventually break up when she realizes she is strong enough to stand on her own and does not need him for emotional support. Streisand is giving a definitive movie star performance here as she radiates charisma from every pore, looks fabulous at all times and knocks you out with her singing and dancing. She is alive with passion in this film as she sells at every moment on the idea that Brice is a unique talent that would have been beloved both then and now. I had a great deal of fun with the scenes in which Streisand humorously roller skates around a stage while performing stand up and singing in addition to appreciating how Streisand carries herself in the few scenes with her mother. Despite how wonderful I think she is I would not have given either her or Katharine Hepburn the Academy Award for Best Actress but would have instead rewarded Joanne Woodward for her spellbinding performance in Rachel, Rachel (1968). The rest of the film is difficult to praise as the story focuses on entirely the wrong aspects while enticing us with the sight of what could be interesting subplots. I found the tortured love story between Brice and Arnstein to be terrifically dull and tedious to watch as it extended the film beyond the tight 100 minutes it should have been and doesn't provide us with any real juicy drama. Part of this is how little Sharif brings to the role as he is completely outshone by his leading lady and we never understand why this dazzling woman would be so dependent on such a nothing character. What I wanted to see more of were the musical numbers as the ballet and the triumphant performance of "My Man" at the end of the film were sights to behold. I also wanted to see more of the delightfully witty Kay Medford who is a hoot as Brice's sassy mother Rose who can elicit laughter simply through saying the word "Ruffles" in a way that leaves you with no doubt as to what the double entendre means. I am saddened that this film, which could have been great, loses itself so completely in it's second half and prevents itself from being as brilliant as Singin' in the Rain (1952) or The Sound of Music (1965). Still worth it for Streisand's performance and the exciting musical numbers but equally worth turning off after the film begins to lose it's way.

  • Mar 30, 2019

    Barbra Streisand's legendary portrayal of singer/comedienne Fanny Brice deservedly won her Oscar (she shared Best Actress with Katharine Hepburn); unfortunately, the Broadway hit was transferred to the screen with mixed results - the first half is a colorful, enjoyable musical comedy while the second act is a maudlin melodrama. Still, there is much to like in William Wyler's adaptation including a fine performance by Omar Sharif and some memorable musical moments: "I'm the Greatest Star," "I'd Rather Be Blue" (on roller skates!), the memorable first act finale on a tugboat to "Don't Rain on My Parade," and Streisand's powerful "My Man" finale.

    Barbra Streisand's legendary portrayal of singer/comedienne Fanny Brice deservedly won her Oscar (she shared Best Actress with Katharine Hepburn); unfortunately, the Broadway hit was transferred to the screen with mixed results - the first half is a colorful, enjoyable musical comedy while the second act is a maudlin melodrama. Still, there is much to like in William Wyler's adaptation including a fine performance by Omar Sharif and some memorable musical moments: "I'm the Greatest Star," "I'd Rather Be Blue" (on roller skates!), the memorable first act finale on a tugboat to "Don't Rain on My Parade," and Streisand's powerful "My Man" finale.