The Grapes of Wrath Reviews

  • Oct 15, 2019

    My all-time favorite movie. Raw, unrelenting and beautifully acted.

    My all-time favorite movie. Raw, unrelenting and beautifully acted.

  • Oct 14, 2019

    Read the book in high school as a reading assignment... And it changed my life. The movie was equally epic.

    Read the book in high school as a reading assignment... And it changed my life. The movie was equally epic.

  • Sep 03, 2019

    Blobbo think movie strong.

    Blobbo think movie strong.

  • Aug 02, 2019

    A potent drama that is as socially important today as when it was made, The Grapes of Wrath is affecting, moving, and deservedly considered an American classic. John Ford. Henry Fonda, Jane Darwell, John Carradine, Charley Grapewin, Dorris Bowden, Russell Simpson, John Qualen, O. Z. Whitehead, Eddie Quillan, Zeffie Tilbury, Darryl Hickman, Ward Bond, Charles Middleton, Tom Tyler, Mae Marsh, Jack Pennick. One of the great American films, an uncompromising adaptation of John Steinbeck's novel about impoverished Okie farmers making the trek to California during the Depression, where the good life they've hoped for is well out of reach. Fonda is great in his defining role as an ex-con whose social conscience is aroused; Darwell is unforgettable as the matriarch Ma Joad. She and Ford won well-deserved Oscars. Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson.

    A potent drama that is as socially important today as when it was made, The Grapes of Wrath is affecting, moving, and deservedly considered an American classic. John Ford. Henry Fonda, Jane Darwell, John Carradine, Charley Grapewin, Dorris Bowden, Russell Simpson, John Qualen, O. Z. Whitehead, Eddie Quillan, Zeffie Tilbury, Darryl Hickman, Ward Bond, Charles Middleton, Tom Tyler, Mae Marsh, Jack Pennick. One of the great American films, an uncompromising adaptation of John Steinbeck's novel about impoverished Okie farmers making the trek to California during the Depression, where the good life they've hoped for is well out of reach. Fonda is great in his defining role as an ex-con whose social conscience is aroused; Darwell is unforgettable as the matriarch Ma Joad. She and Ford won well-deserved Oscars. Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson.

  • Jun 01, 2019

    A classic of american cinema that depicts the social issues post the Great Depression, The Grapes of Wrath seems to have lost its potency after the years.

    A classic of american cinema that depicts the social issues post the Great Depression, The Grapes of Wrath seems to have lost its potency after the years.

  • May 22, 2019

    This is one of the greatest films of all time, in my opinion, and it is just as affecting today as it was in 1940. One of the many incredible things that the film manages to do is adapt the powerful John Steinbeck novel, which won the Pulitzer Prize, without losing any of the subtle detail that makes the story so devastating. Henry Fonda and Jane Darwell give some of the greatest performances I have ever seen as they express all of the internal pain of their characters through facial expressions and small gestures, they're better than almost any actor working today and 79 years later they still appear brilliant. I felt a deep sadness and compassion for those who faced this historical tragedy with absolutely no support and this film explains why social change was needed in the United States during this time period better than almost any social issues focused picture. The Joad family, led by adult son Tom Joad, Henry Fonda, and Ma Joad, Jane Darwell, are forced to leave their family farm in Oklahoma and travel to California as a result of the Dust Bowl. They face a grueling journey along Route 66 as they are following thousands of other Okies and Arkies with the same problems and experience the deaths of the oldest members of their families. They find respite at a camp but this may not be enough as it implied that the camp is communist based and when preacher Jim Casy, John Carradine, a family friend who has joined them on their journey, comes into conflict with the police there are disastrous consequences. This film takes a large scale tragedy that hurt so many people and caused major social upheaval and tells this story through the lives of a few ordinary, well written characters whose lives are irreparably changed by the Dust Bowl. The supportive, unflappable matriarch and the flawed but hopeful son are common archetypes in film but here they feel real and fleshed out because we spend time with them and see in their everyday interactions who they really are. It helps that director John Ford is an expert at capturing little moments in people's lives that are more revealing than any big, emotional scene. I was connected to this family and desperate to see them prosper despite their circumstances. How Fonda's performance didn't earn him the Academy Award for Best Actor I don't understand, obviously the Academy get more wrong that right but this is one of the best performances by an actor I have ever seen. The complex emotions that pass over his faces even if only for a short moment reach out and pull you into his story as he is the emotional center of the film. Darwell was rewarded for her performance with the Best Supporting Actress Academy Award and the quiet strength and morose commitment that she displays will forever be in my mind. I was invested in Tom and Ma Joad because Darwell and Fonda made them feel so fully realized and I held on to them even as the film's credits played and the illusion was broken. John Ford primarily worked as a director of Westerns, a genre that I'm not particularly fond of, and although I've seen The Searchers (1956) and Stagecoach (1939) I would call this my favorite of the films he has directed. He has such a clear vision for the film as we get classic Ford shots that capture the landscape and scenery that have made these people's lives so rough. Ford is gifted with a great screenplay from Nunnally Johnson that brings the story and characters to life better than in say My Darling Clementine (1946). Ford deserves to be considered one of the greatest directors of all time even if only for this film because it is such a marvel of cinematic excellence. I would rank this highly if I were ever to create a Top 100 Films list and I think it deserves to have a large audience not just because of it's importance but because it is a well made, genuinely moving film that is a testament to the power of film in it's ability to express the anguish of a whole generation.

    This is one of the greatest films of all time, in my opinion, and it is just as affecting today as it was in 1940. One of the many incredible things that the film manages to do is adapt the powerful John Steinbeck novel, which won the Pulitzer Prize, without losing any of the subtle detail that makes the story so devastating. Henry Fonda and Jane Darwell give some of the greatest performances I have ever seen as they express all of the internal pain of their characters through facial expressions and small gestures, they're better than almost any actor working today and 79 years later they still appear brilliant. I felt a deep sadness and compassion for those who faced this historical tragedy with absolutely no support and this film explains why social change was needed in the United States during this time period better than almost any social issues focused picture. The Joad family, led by adult son Tom Joad, Henry Fonda, and Ma Joad, Jane Darwell, are forced to leave their family farm in Oklahoma and travel to California as a result of the Dust Bowl. They face a grueling journey along Route 66 as they are following thousands of other Okies and Arkies with the same problems and experience the deaths of the oldest members of their families. They find respite at a camp but this may not be enough as it implied that the camp is communist based and when preacher Jim Casy, John Carradine, a family friend who has joined them on their journey, comes into conflict with the police there are disastrous consequences. This film takes a large scale tragedy that hurt so many people and caused major social upheaval and tells this story through the lives of a few ordinary, well written characters whose lives are irreparably changed by the Dust Bowl. The supportive, unflappable matriarch and the flawed but hopeful son are common archetypes in film but here they feel real and fleshed out because we spend time with them and see in their everyday interactions who they really are. It helps that director John Ford is an expert at capturing little moments in people's lives that are more revealing than any big, emotional scene. I was connected to this family and desperate to see them prosper despite their circumstances. How Fonda's performance didn't earn him the Academy Award for Best Actor I don't understand, obviously the Academy get more wrong that right but this is one of the best performances by an actor I have ever seen. The complex emotions that pass over his faces even if only for a short moment reach out and pull you into his story as he is the emotional center of the film. Darwell was rewarded for her performance with the Best Supporting Actress Academy Award and the quiet strength and morose commitment that she displays will forever be in my mind. I was invested in Tom and Ma Joad because Darwell and Fonda made them feel so fully realized and I held on to them even as the film's credits played and the illusion was broken. John Ford primarily worked as a director of Westerns, a genre that I'm not particularly fond of, and although I've seen The Searchers (1956) and Stagecoach (1939) I would call this my favorite of the films he has directed. He has such a clear vision for the film as we get classic Ford shots that capture the landscape and scenery that have made these people's lives so rough. Ford is gifted with a great screenplay from Nunnally Johnson that brings the story and characters to life better than in say My Darling Clementine (1946). Ford deserves to be considered one of the greatest directors of all time even if only for this film because it is such a marvel of cinematic excellence. I would rank this highly if I were ever to create a Top 100 Films list and I think it deserves to have a large audience not just because of it's importance but because it is a well made, genuinely moving film that is a testament to the power of film in it's ability to express the anguish of a whole generation.

  • Feb 21, 2019

    The film ï¿ 1/2~Grapes of Wrathï¿ 1/2(TM) was directed by John Ford. It was written by Nunnally Johnson; based on the novel ï¿ 1/2~The Grapes of Wrathï¿ 1/2(TM) by John Steinbeck. Darryl Zanuck and Nunnally Johnson produced it. It first aired in 1940. The film ï¿ 1/2~Grapes of Wrathï¿ 1/2(TM) starts off with a man by the name of Tom Joad, played by Henry Fonda, walking down a long road in Oklahoma during the Great Depression. He seeks a ride from a truckdriver at a local gas station, trying to get home to his family. Tom Joad was just released from prison before the movie begins. After finding a truck driver willing to give him a ride, he stops at a dirt road off of the highway and continues by foot until he runs into a preacher he knew growing up. The preacher named Jim Casy, played by John Carradine, tells Tom that he is no longer a preacher and that a lot has changed since he went away to prison. They continue on towards Tomï¿ 1/2(TM)s family home where they discover that no one is home, and that the whole family already left to Uncle Johns house due to the banks repossessing all the farms in the area. Families that have lived and worked on the land for years were for the first time in generations being told they have to leave and have nowhere to go. Tom invites Jim to join him on the trip to his Uncles house. When they arrive, the family is shocked and very happy to see Tom come home. They explain the situation is the same at Uncle Johnï¿ 1/2(TM)s house, and that they have to be out very soon. The family saved up to purchase a car, and hopefully enough money to get them food for their trip to California where they have been told by fliers that there is ample work there. The family packs up the car and makes the long trip from Oklahoma to California. During the trip from Oklahoma to California both grandparents pass away as it is simply too hard on them. Pa Joad, played by Russell Simpson, organizes the trip and tries to get food and candies for the little ones, but the trip and experience is very hard on him. Ma Joad, played by Jane Darwell, is a strong support for the family as she keeps moral up as best as she can. As the family makes a several stops to camp out on their way to California they meet up other families doing the same. One night at one of the campgrounds, Pa Joad learns that the flier he got stating there enough jobs for 800 people was sent out to thousands of people. The traveler that tells him this explains that is because the owner of the land is trying to get extremely cheap labor, and by having thousands show up, he can offer an unreasonably low pay; assuming the most desperate will still accept the work. This discussion ends in an argument, and the Joad family decides to ignore the manï¿ 1/2(TM)s story. The Joads continue traveling until they reach a farm looking for work with a campgrounds of other Oklahoma folk living out of their cars and tents with entire families. As they enter they get an odd feeling about the owners and the local police. People are treating extremely poorly, and offered horrible pay for picking fruit. Some of the people protest and want to organize a strike. One evening Tom goes for a walk after dinner, only to find Jim talking to other people under a bridge. They are discussing organizing a strike in large numbers demanding better pay. Just as they are discussing this, the local police, whom have forbid the ï¿ 1/2~Oakiesï¿ 1/2(TM) from walking around after dark, attack the group of men. During the struggle one of the cops kill Jim. This angers Tom, who retaliates by killing one of the police officers. Tom gets injured in this altercation and knows he must flee. He goes back to the cabin where his family is sleeping and plans on leaving in the middle of the night before his Ma convinces him that they will all sneak out together and find better work elsewhere. CONT...

    The film ï¿ 1/2~Grapes of Wrathï¿ 1/2(TM) was directed by John Ford. It was written by Nunnally Johnson; based on the novel ï¿ 1/2~The Grapes of Wrathï¿ 1/2(TM) by John Steinbeck. Darryl Zanuck and Nunnally Johnson produced it. It first aired in 1940. The film ï¿ 1/2~Grapes of Wrathï¿ 1/2(TM) starts off with a man by the name of Tom Joad, played by Henry Fonda, walking down a long road in Oklahoma during the Great Depression. He seeks a ride from a truckdriver at a local gas station, trying to get home to his family. Tom Joad was just released from prison before the movie begins. After finding a truck driver willing to give him a ride, he stops at a dirt road off of the highway and continues by foot until he runs into a preacher he knew growing up. The preacher named Jim Casy, played by John Carradine, tells Tom that he is no longer a preacher and that a lot has changed since he went away to prison. They continue on towards Tomï¿ 1/2(TM)s family home where they discover that no one is home, and that the whole family already left to Uncle Johns house due to the banks repossessing all the farms in the area. Families that have lived and worked on the land for years were for the first time in generations being told they have to leave and have nowhere to go. Tom invites Jim to join him on the trip to his Uncles house. When they arrive, the family is shocked and very happy to see Tom come home. They explain the situation is the same at Uncle Johnï¿ 1/2(TM)s house, and that they have to be out very soon. The family saved up to purchase a car, and hopefully enough money to get them food for their trip to California where they have been told by fliers that there is ample work there. The family packs up the car and makes the long trip from Oklahoma to California. During the trip from Oklahoma to California both grandparents pass away as it is simply too hard on them. Pa Joad, played by Russell Simpson, organizes the trip and tries to get food and candies for the little ones, but the trip and experience is very hard on him. Ma Joad, played by Jane Darwell, is a strong support for the family as she keeps moral up as best as she can. As the family makes a several stops to camp out on their way to California they meet up other families doing the same. One night at one of the campgrounds, Pa Joad learns that the flier he got stating there enough jobs for 800 people was sent out to thousands of people. The traveler that tells him this explains that is because the owner of the land is trying to get extremely cheap labor, and by having thousands show up, he can offer an unreasonably low pay; assuming the most desperate will still accept the work. This discussion ends in an argument, and the Joad family decides to ignore the manï¿ 1/2(TM)s story. The Joads continue traveling until they reach a farm looking for work with a campgrounds of other Oklahoma folk living out of their cars and tents with entire families. As they enter they get an odd feeling about the owners and the local police. People are treating extremely poorly, and offered horrible pay for picking fruit. Some of the people protest and want to organize a strike. One evening Tom goes for a walk after dinner, only to find Jim talking to other people under a bridge. They are discussing organizing a strike in large numbers demanding better pay. Just as they are discussing this, the local police, whom have forbid the ï¿ 1/2~Oakiesï¿ 1/2(TM) from walking around after dark, attack the group of men. During the struggle one of the cops kill Jim. This angers Tom, who retaliates by killing one of the police officers. Tom gets injured in this altercation and knows he must flee. He goes back to the cabin where his family is sleeping and plans on leaving in the middle of the night before his Ma convinces him that they will all sneak out together and find better work elsewhere. CONT...

  • Jan 24, 2019

    scum like these ruined my beautiful state of California, they should have been deported back to Oklahoma as fast as possible, being a 6th generation Californian I hate commie film makers who bullshit their "stories" as some version of "Das Kapital" Henry fonda and his pathetic woah is me crap sucks as does his politics, typical democrat

    scum like these ruined my beautiful state of California, they should have been deported back to Oklahoma as fast as possible, being a 6th generation Californian I hate commie film makers who bullshit their "stories" as some version of "Das Kapital" Henry fonda and his pathetic woah is me crap sucks as does his politics, typical democrat

  • Jan 20, 2019

    The Grapes of Wrath movie is based on novel written by John Steinbeck. The novel was published in 1939 and the movie was directed by John Ford in the year 1940. The setting of the movie takes place in Oklahoma City and throughout the movie shifts to California. The main character in the movie is Tom Joad, played by Henry Fonda, who is released from the penitentiary and looking forward to seeing his family after four years of being away. To his surprise, he learns that his parents, Ma and Pa Joad, along with other family members and neighbors, were forced to leave the homes they had lived and farmed over 50 years by wealthy bank owners. When Tom reunites with his family, he further learns about a handbill soliciting Pickers in California. The story line is about the family's journey from Oklahoma to California and the arduous challenges they encounter throughout their travels. Yet, in their quest to reach what they envisioned as 'The Promise Land and The Land of Milk and Honey', they set out with high hopes and the prospect of turning around their dreaded fate in Oklahoma City for beautiful and luscious lands in California. In addition to challenging, the travels of the Joad family and others migrating to California proved to be fatal. Notwithstanding, they maintained their faith and prospect of securing full time employment upon arrival. Adversity was short-term in their minds. However, little did they know that they would find that 'The Promise Land and The Land of Milk and Honey' which they envisioned would be threatened by the socialites and people in power in California. The Joad Family wanted to work and earn an earnest living. Yet, despite their well-intentions to be great citizens, they experienced difficulties finding work, putting food on the table, and pursuing a little piece of the American dream because they were not welcomed nor wanted in the migrant-filled state of California. Great film which one a Pulitzer-Prize. Appropriate for all family members to watch. Film is black and white. Very simple to follow and understand movie. Difficult at times to watch the challenges of this family and migrant friends. It is a humbling experience we can all learn from which occurred during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Highly recommend spending the $3.99 to view this great movie.

    The Grapes of Wrath movie is based on novel written by John Steinbeck. The novel was published in 1939 and the movie was directed by John Ford in the year 1940. The setting of the movie takes place in Oklahoma City and throughout the movie shifts to California. The main character in the movie is Tom Joad, played by Henry Fonda, who is released from the penitentiary and looking forward to seeing his family after four years of being away. To his surprise, he learns that his parents, Ma and Pa Joad, along with other family members and neighbors, were forced to leave the homes they had lived and farmed over 50 years by wealthy bank owners. When Tom reunites with his family, he further learns about a handbill soliciting Pickers in California. The story line is about the family's journey from Oklahoma to California and the arduous challenges they encounter throughout their travels. Yet, in their quest to reach what they envisioned as 'The Promise Land and The Land of Milk and Honey', they set out with high hopes and the prospect of turning around their dreaded fate in Oklahoma City for beautiful and luscious lands in California. In addition to challenging, the travels of the Joad family and others migrating to California proved to be fatal. Notwithstanding, they maintained their faith and prospect of securing full time employment upon arrival. Adversity was short-term in their minds. However, little did they know that they would find that 'The Promise Land and The Land of Milk and Honey' which they envisioned would be threatened by the socialites and people in power in California. The Joad Family wanted to work and earn an earnest living. Yet, despite their well-intentions to be great citizens, they experienced difficulties finding work, putting food on the table, and pursuing a little piece of the American dream because they were not welcomed nor wanted in the migrant-filled state of California. Great film which one a Pulitzer-Prize. Appropriate for all family members to watch. Film is black and white. Very simple to follow and understand movie. Difficult at times to watch the challenges of this family and migrant friends. It is a humbling experience we can all learn from which occurred during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Highly recommend spending the $3.99 to view this great movie.

  • Jan 20, 2019

    The Grapes of Wrath is a powerful screen adaption of John Steinbeck's 1938 widely-acclaimed novel of the same name. The drama is set in the midwest during the Great Depression which showcases the livelihood of the Joad family as they face homelessness, unemployment, and starvation. The hopelessness of their situation being a predominant theme throughout the film. The movie focuses on the perspective of our protagonist, Tom Joad, and how he and his family survived misfortunes caused by the Dust Bowl. Their home was taken away as the bank repossesses their land, their only choice being to get in their truck and cross the desert for hope. Living through the Great Depression the family couldn't avoid the natural disaster by investing into any industrial equipment to keep their land and they were forced to abandon their land/business. The film captures the family's agonizing uncertainty while they look for hope in California. It wasn't the only family looking for hope though, reason why jobs and food were limited. The people in California did not welcome the migrants and they called them the "Okies". They were put in camps and starved. One camp, "Hoovervilles" named after the President who many considered the one responsible for causing the Great depression. This movie takes a closer look on the reality lived during the Great Depression. Tom Joad is portrayed by Henry Fonda whose performance was nominated for an Oscar. The movie was directed by John Ford and produced by Darryl. F Zanuck, while screenplay was written by Nunnally Johnson that focused on the whole journey of the Joad family. To sum up I highly recommend this movie because it is the closest we can go to relate to the people living through the Great Depression. The film captures the family's sorrow and the agonizing uncertainty endured along their journey in search for opportunity in the west. While the family was searching for hope in California some members of the family die off or left on the way, while Ma Joad tries really hard to keep the family together. On the other hand, Tom begins to perceive a new vision for humanity.

    The Grapes of Wrath is a powerful screen adaption of John Steinbeck's 1938 widely-acclaimed novel of the same name. The drama is set in the midwest during the Great Depression which showcases the livelihood of the Joad family as they face homelessness, unemployment, and starvation. The hopelessness of their situation being a predominant theme throughout the film. The movie focuses on the perspective of our protagonist, Tom Joad, and how he and his family survived misfortunes caused by the Dust Bowl. Their home was taken away as the bank repossesses their land, their only choice being to get in their truck and cross the desert for hope. Living through the Great Depression the family couldn't avoid the natural disaster by investing into any industrial equipment to keep their land and they were forced to abandon their land/business. The film captures the family's agonizing uncertainty while they look for hope in California. It wasn't the only family looking for hope though, reason why jobs and food were limited. The people in California did not welcome the migrants and they called them the "Okies". They were put in camps and starved. One camp, "Hoovervilles" named after the President who many considered the one responsible for causing the Great depression. This movie takes a closer look on the reality lived during the Great Depression. Tom Joad is portrayed by Henry Fonda whose performance was nominated for an Oscar. The movie was directed by John Ford and produced by Darryl. F Zanuck, while screenplay was written by Nunnally Johnson that focused on the whole journey of the Joad family. To sum up I highly recommend this movie because it is the closest we can go to relate to the people living through the Great Depression. The film captures the family's sorrow and the agonizing uncertainty endured along their journey in search for opportunity in the west. While the family was searching for hope in California some members of the family die off or left on the way, while Ma Joad tries really hard to keep the family together. On the other hand, Tom begins to perceive a new vision for humanity.