Happy, Happy Reviews

  • Dec 18, 2014

    While it may not be profoundly cinematic, the dynamics between Happy, Happy's quartet of main characters make for an interesting and engaging watch, sprinkled with some typically dark Scandinavian humour.

    While it may not be profoundly cinematic, the dynamics between Happy, Happy's quartet of main characters make for an interesting and engaging watch, sprinkled with some typically dark Scandinavian humour.

  • Dec 06, 2014

    Enjoyable premise and quirky film, but somehow very ordinary.

    Enjoyable premise and quirky film, but somehow very ordinary.

  • Aug 30, 2014

    A very good choice for the fans of Scandinavian cinema - light, funny, yet touching quite a dramatic topic and area.

    A very good choice for the fans of Scandinavian cinema - light, funny, yet touching quite a dramatic topic and area.

  • Mar 30, 2014

    Interesting, unique.

    Interesting, unique.

  • Jul 15, 2013

    Pretty good indie film!

    Pretty good indie film!

  • Jun 27, 2013

    Family is the most important thing in the world to Kaja (Agnes Kittelsen). She is an eternal optimist in spite of living with a man who would rather go hunting with the boys and isn't interested in having sex with her anymore because she "isn't particularly attractive." Whatever. That's life. But when "the perfect couple", Sigve (Henrik Rafaelsen) and Elisabeth (Maibritt Saerens), moves in next door, Kaja struggles to keep her emotions in check. Not only do these successful, beautiful, exciting people sing in a choir, they have also adopted a child - from Ethiopia! These new neighbours open a whole new world to Kaja, with consequences for everyone involved. And when Christmas comes around, it becomes evident that nothing will ever be like before - even if Kaja tries her very best... I wanted to see "Happy, Happy" because of Agnes Kittelsen whom I have seen in the norwegian tv-show DAG. The problem with "Happy, Happy" is that the build up to the main plot takes a bit too long, Kaja isn´t that loveable unfortunately and the movie struggles with a confused identity if it´s a comedy, a drama or both. The musical interludes performed by a quartet builds on the confused identity as well. I reckon they aimed for comedy quirkiness á la Zooey Deschanel, but ended up with something vague, slightly depressing and not that funny. But, I still like Agnes Kittelsen.

    Family is the most important thing in the world to Kaja (Agnes Kittelsen). She is an eternal optimist in spite of living with a man who would rather go hunting with the boys and isn't interested in having sex with her anymore because she "isn't particularly attractive." Whatever. That's life. But when "the perfect couple", Sigve (Henrik Rafaelsen) and Elisabeth (Maibritt Saerens), moves in next door, Kaja struggles to keep her emotions in check. Not only do these successful, beautiful, exciting people sing in a choir, they have also adopted a child - from Ethiopia! These new neighbours open a whole new world to Kaja, with consequences for everyone involved. And when Christmas comes around, it becomes evident that nothing will ever be like before - even if Kaja tries her very best... I wanted to see "Happy, Happy" because of Agnes Kittelsen whom I have seen in the norwegian tv-show DAG. The problem with "Happy, Happy" is that the build up to the main plot takes a bit too long, Kaja isn´t that loveable unfortunately and the movie struggles with a confused identity if it´s a comedy, a drama or both. The musical interludes performed by a quartet builds on the confused identity as well. I reckon they aimed for comedy quirkiness á la Zooey Deschanel, but ended up with something vague, slightly depressing and not that funny. But, I still like Agnes Kittelsen.

  • Apr 10, 2013

    Life and love in the land of snow. There are some very convincing relationships in this movie, and although it's a comedy it's also quite moving. In a painful kind of a way. The events are a bit OTT, and farcical, and the addition of a capella singers at odd intervals is a nice touch. Good stuff.

    Life and love in the land of snow. There are some very convincing relationships in this movie, and although it's a comedy it's also quite moving. In a painful kind of a way. The events are a bit OTT, and farcical, and the addition of a capella singers at odd intervals is a nice touch. Good stuff.

  • Cynthia S Super Reviewer
    Mar 13, 2013

    An attempt at quirkiness...kind of failed. The movie itself wasn't bad, but it just seemed pointless. Apparently, someone suggested add some guys that sing a little diddy every so often, and people will love it, and say it is quirky. Nope...

    An attempt at quirkiness...kind of failed. The movie itself wasn't bad, but it just seemed pointless. Apparently, someone suggested add some guys that sing a little diddy every so often, and people will love it, and say it is quirky. Nope...

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Feb 21, 2013

    In "Happy, Happy," Elisabeth(Maibritt Saerens), a lawyer, and Sigve(Henrik Rafaelsen) move with their adopted son Noa(Ram Shihab Ebedy) to a small town for a fresh start after Elisabeth's marital indiscretion. Aside from their volunteering for the local choir, they are warmly welcomed by neighbors Kaja(Agnes Kittelsen) and Eirik(Joachim Rafaelsen) who invite them over for game night. Then, Elisabeth and Sigve reciprocate in a night that soon turns confessional before Kaja gives Sigve a blow job. You know you're in deep trouble as a non-musical film if the best part is the music, especially in the case of "Happy, "Happy" where the entertaining interludes performed by a quartet prove to be about the only reasons to watch this very murky film. Otherwise, it takes forever for the slim plot to kick in, as the movie without a true point of view is unsure of whether or not it is a comedy. To be honest, it is possible something got lost in translation or I didn't understand some Scandinavian cultural attitudes. That still can't explain the weird interaction between the boys which goes far beyond bullying.

    In "Happy, Happy," Elisabeth(Maibritt Saerens), a lawyer, and Sigve(Henrik Rafaelsen) move with their adopted son Noa(Ram Shihab Ebedy) to a small town for a fresh start after Elisabeth's marital indiscretion. Aside from their volunteering for the local choir, they are warmly welcomed by neighbors Kaja(Agnes Kittelsen) and Eirik(Joachim Rafaelsen) who invite them over for game night. Then, Elisabeth and Sigve reciprocate in a night that soon turns confessional before Kaja gives Sigve a blow job. You know you're in deep trouble as a non-musical film if the best part is the music, especially in the case of "Happy, "Happy" where the entertaining interludes performed by a quartet prove to be about the only reasons to watch this very murky film. Otherwise, it takes forever for the slim plot to kick in, as the movie without a true point of view is unsure of whether or not it is a comedy. To be honest, it is possible something got lost in translation or I didn't understand some Scandinavian cultural attitudes. That still can't explain the weird interaction between the boys which goes far beyond bullying.

  • Feb 03, 2013

    My heart just fell apart for Kaja, the main character. She got treated terribly, but I can also see where her husband's annoyance was coming from and it wasn't Kaja. The characterization was a bit obvious, so it was more of a light-hearted movie, but still realistic. It shows the cold spectrum of emotion and shows somewhat where it comes from in Kaja's husband's case, but not the other wife's case. This is a movie that shows how kindness and patience could be mistaken for a weakness. I still feel like there wasn't much resolved when it came to the children. Now for the other couple, I'm a bit more harsh on the wife, but then again it's neither one's fault usually, but it was nice to see her warm up a bit. I can recognize her cold sense of humor, but I would've liked to see how that developed...maybe I missed some hints..

    My heart just fell apart for Kaja, the main character. She got treated terribly, but I can also see where her husband's annoyance was coming from and it wasn't Kaja. The characterization was a bit obvious, so it was more of a light-hearted movie, but still realistic. It shows the cold spectrum of emotion and shows somewhat where it comes from in Kaja's husband's case, but not the other wife's case. This is a movie that shows how kindness and patience could be mistaken for a weakness. I still feel like there wasn't much resolved when it came to the children. Now for the other couple, I'm a bit more harsh on the wife, but then again it's neither one's fault usually, but it was nice to see her warm up a bit. I can recognize her cold sense of humor, but I would've liked to see how that developed...maybe I missed some hints..