Hardware Reviews

  • Oct 27, 2022

    *Slaps roof* This baby can fit so many random musicians in it. For a movie that starts off by introducing Iggy Pop as a radio announcer named 'Angry Bob with the Industrial Dick', Hardware is a pretty dull film overall. It's a lot of setup for a killer robot in a post-apocalyptic environment, harvesting the aesthetic of something like Blade Runner with a way lower budget, much less impressive writing and themes, and dodgy acting. Doesn't matter that GWAR and Lemmy show up, the film can't help but feel like a way slower version of Terminator with worse worldbuilding. Most of the action rips off sci-fi shoot-'em'ups of the '80s with a less impressive budget but more gore, and there isn't much in the way of subtext to fall back on even when the visual design is actually pretty high-reaching. Retrofuturism is usually pretty fun though. A bleak, post-apocalyptic industrial future with traveling scavengers picking over the remains of a dead world ... where Schlitz beer is still sold in the '90s cans. (2/5)

    *Slaps roof* This baby can fit so many random musicians in it. For a movie that starts off by introducing Iggy Pop as a radio announcer named 'Angry Bob with the Industrial Dick', Hardware is a pretty dull film overall. It's a lot of setup for a killer robot in a post-apocalyptic environment, harvesting the aesthetic of something like Blade Runner with a way lower budget, much less impressive writing and themes, and dodgy acting. Doesn't matter that GWAR and Lemmy show up, the film can't help but feel like a way slower version of Terminator with worse worldbuilding. Most of the action rips off sci-fi shoot-'em'ups of the '80s with a less impressive budget but more gore, and there isn't much in the way of subtext to fall back on even when the visual design is actually pretty high-reaching. Retrofuturism is usually pretty fun though. A bleak, post-apocalyptic industrial future with traveling scavengers picking over the remains of a dead world ... where Schlitz beer is still sold in the '90s cans. (2/5)

  • Jul 23, 2022

    The premise is interesting in theory but in reality the execution is a big mess of better Sci-fi films mixed together.

    The premise is interesting in theory but in reality the execution is a big mess of better Sci-fi films mixed together.

  • Mar 02, 2022

    Not worth the time. The fans love it for reasons unknown. Just move along to something else, you won't regret it.

    Not worth the time. The fans love it for reasons unknown. Just move along to something else, you won't regret it.

  • Jan 28, 2022

    I missed this movie in the cinemas back in 1990, totally forgot about it, then recently found it on a streaming website. I quite enjoyed it (with some caveats) and I'm surprised it's not better known in the sci-fi cult genre; but then Richard Stanley's career is not that well publicised (Dust Devil, in a similar style to this, was also made around this time and is worth a watch if you like this). It's based on a story from 2000AD (British Sci-fi comic that originated Judge Dredd) and it shows; there's barely an hour of story here but it's stretched out to 90 minutes with some filler and some atmospheric development. Hardware takes elements/influences /inspiration from Alien, Blade Runner and The Terminator without really copying from any of them (although the sets do draw heavily from BR) and the central idea is solid enough to allow it to stand on its own feet. For fans of 80s cyberpunk this is a must and it will pass an evening entertainingly enough.

    I missed this movie in the cinemas back in 1990, totally forgot about it, then recently found it on a streaming website. I quite enjoyed it (with some caveats) and I'm surprised it's not better known in the sci-fi cult genre; but then Richard Stanley's career is not that well publicised (Dust Devil, in a similar style to this, was also made around this time and is worth a watch if you like this). It's based on a story from 2000AD (British Sci-fi comic that originated Judge Dredd) and it shows; there's barely an hour of story here but it's stretched out to 90 minutes with some filler and some atmospheric development. Hardware takes elements/influences /inspiration from Alien, Blade Runner and The Terminator without really copying from any of them (although the sets do draw heavily from BR) and the central idea is solid enough to allow it to stand on its own feet. For fans of 80s cyberpunk this is a must and it will pass an evening entertainingly enough.

  • Jan 20, 2022

    This movie was as boring as it was obnoxious. Nothing interesting is shown, said or happens It all takes place on some dark apartment, that you get sick of by minute 10.

    This movie was as boring as it was obnoxious. Nothing interesting is shown, said or happens It all takes place on some dark apartment, that you get sick of by minute 10.

  • Jan 06, 2022

    Great cast, setting, great sets and costume design. It does suffer a little bit from a low budget and outdated special effects but aside from that it's great.

    Great cast, setting, great sets and costume design. It does suffer a little bit from a low budget and outdated special effects but aside from that it's great.

  • Dec 16, 2021

    Dystopian desert scavengers unearth the remains of a beaten-up hunter droid and drag it, in pieces, back to civilization. There, the skull-faced deathbot is incorporated into an artist's canvas and accidentally re-activated, whereupon he initiates a self-repair protocol and indiscriminately slaughters anyone within reach. This whole thing is a loud, brazen chunk of flimsy punk rock chaos. Everything looks cool on the surface, but like the grim, edgy anti-hero comic books that were flooding the scene at the time, Hardware's interests really begin and end with its aesthetic. It lobs a few flailing attempts at a broad moral framework, something about class warfare and an out-of-touch government, but those gestures are cursory at best and extremely simplistic. This is a b-grade killer robot movie from 1990, and everything that statement might imply is probably true. Its special effects, while inspired, are cripplingly low-budget and often marred by smoke, quick cuts or strobe effects. The script is loaded with groan-worthy dialogue and spacious plot holes, not to mention something like seven fake-out endings. I'm not convinced any of the actors had worked in film before. Well, except maybe Iggy Pop and Lemmy from Motörhead, who randomly lean in for a pair of brief, grinning, charismatic cameos before departing for good. This is just objectively not-good, even in the areas where one might hope it would shine. Cult-friendly as hell, though, which explains its lasting (if limited) appeal. If neon-drenched, softcore sex scenes and abrupt, grotesque deaths are your jam, Hardware has got you covered. For about thirty minutes. Skip the rest.

    Dystopian desert scavengers unearth the remains of a beaten-up hunter droid and drag it, in pieces, back to civilization. There, the skull-faced deathbot is incorporated into an artist's canvas and accidentally re-activated, whereupon he initiates a self-repair protocol and indiscriminately slaughters anyone within reach. This whole thing is a loud, brazen chunk of flimsy punk rock chaos. Everything looks cool on the surface, but like the grim, edgy anti-hero comic books that were flooding the scene at the time, Hardware's interests really begin and end with its aesthetic. It lobs a few flailing attempts at a broad moral framework, something about class warfare and an out-of-touch government, but those gestures are cursory at best and extremely simplistic. This is a b-grade killer robot movie from 1990, and everything that statement might imply is probably true. Its special effects, while inspired, are cripplingly low-budget and often marred by smoke, quick cuts or strobe effects. The script is loaded with groan-worthy dialogue and spacious plot holes, not to mention something like seven fake-out endings. I'm not convinced any of the actors had worked in film before. Well, except maybe Iggy Pop and Lemmy from Motörhead, who randomly lean in for a pair of brief, grinning, charismatic cameos before departing for good. This is just objectively not-good, even in the areas where one might hope it would shine. Cult-friendly as hell, though, which explains its lasting (if limited) appeal. If neon-drenched, softcore sex scenes and abrupt, grotesque deaths are your jam, Hardware has got you covered. For about thirty minutes. Skip the rest.

  • Oct 11, 2021

    "Used to be you could walk down here any time. Go out on a Saturday night with just brass knuckles, nothing else. Maybe a piece of wood or something, piece of pipe, you know what I mean? Nowadays, you need a gun, all the time." A post-apocalyptic prospector picks a robot head which is far more powerful than he imagined as it's able to reassemble itself and in doing so reveals itself to be a killbot! A sex pervert named Weinberg (played by a character actor who was in "Star Wars", "Indiana Jones", "Batman", "Superman IV", & "Flash Gordon"!) has been spying on the ladies; the killbot must have some fembot heritage because it takes the creeper out in a gory manner. I didn't care for stylish filming and odd visuals (fog, saturated reds and blues, overuse of closeups, etc). Lemmy, Iggy Pop, and Carl McCoy (of Fields of the Nephilim, who guested on a Watain record) all act in this scifi-action/horror. For some reason, we listen to "Stigmata" by Ministry while a video for GWAR plays. Also, "Ace of Spades" plays as Lemmy drives the water taxi!

    "Used to be you could walk down here any time. Go out on a Saturday night with just brass knuckles, nothing else. Maybe a piece of wood or something, piece of pipe, you know what I mean? Nowadays, you need a gun, all the time." A post-apocalyptic prospector picks a robot head which is far more powerful than he imagined as it's able to reassemble itself and in doing so reveals itself to be a killbot! A sex pervert named Weinberg (played by a character actor who was in "Star Wars", "Indiana Jones", "Batman", "Superman IV", & "Flash Gordon"!) has been spying on the ladies; the killbot must have some fembot heritage because it takes the creeper out in a gory manner. I didn't care for stylish filming and odd visuals (fog, saturated reds and blues, overuse of closeups, etc). Lemmy, Iggy Pop, and Carl McCoy (of Fields of the Nephilim, who guested on a Watain record) all act in this scifi-action/horror. For some reason, we listen to "Stigmata" by Ministry while a video for GWAR plays. Also, "Ace of Spades" plays as Lemmy drives the water taxi!

  • May 18, 2021

    Good-looking sci-fi thriller despite its low budget is a noteworthy achievement, although there many derivative elements in its plot and effects.

    Good-looking sci-fi thriller despite its low budget is a noteworthy achievement, although there many derivative elements in its plot and effects.

  • Apr 29, 2021

    Absolutely underrated Sci-Fi Horror before its time. Great cinematography, production design, acting, and score combine do make this iconic cult classic. While occassionally hokey it does a huge amount with a low budget to evoke a rich and detailed world. It's a crime its not more widely known and praised.

    Absolutely underrated Sci-Fi Horror before its time. Great cinematography, production design, acting, and score combine do make this iconic cult classic. While occassionally hokey it does a huge amount with a low budget to evoke a rich and detailed world. It's a crime its not more widely known and praised.