His Girl Friday Reviews

  • Aug 17, 2019

    The one-liners and repartee are as thickly layered as the Sunday edition and come at the audience with the dizzying velocity, at something like 240 words per minute, of a spinning newspaper declaring a war of words; yet, in a surprisingly progressive sense, there is also more here than just screwball banter, the romantic relationship being a supernumerary (a slightly lesser, in importance and quality) addition to the source material's comedic refusal of conventional domesticity.

    The one-liners and repartee are as thickly layered as the Sunday edition and come at the audience with the dizzying velocity, at something like 240 words per minute, of a spinning newspaper declaring a war of words; yet, in a surprisingly progressive sense, there is also more here than just screwball banter, the romantic relationship being a supernumerary (a slightly lesser, in importance and quality) addition to the source material's comedic refusal of conventional domesticity.

  • May 31, 2019

    Grant relies more than Russell does on him, empowerment need not be so loud and cheesy, it can be flawed and nuanced as such. His Girl Friday Hawks has a deadline. And just like working at those late hours on Friday night, the director Howard Hawks, seems like he is always in a rush. Luckily, armed with a content so hefty and tone so crowd pleasing, the rush never overpowers the joy of watching two con artists con each other. And that is how good the performers are. The actors. Who themselves have a job to con, to do that purposefully, creates a bizarre play between reality and what they pretend to be, we as an audience, as a result, are having the time of our lives. The splashy humor is the only way this film would have worked. Focusing on an intensely delicate matter, the political satire that puts media and more importantly an authoritarian and his or her use or misuse of power is imply smart. To pin down that transition when an information is revealed, these opposite sides of the coin- drama and comedy- helps them immensely to enchant the viewers. What is joked about, shouldn't be joked about. But since it is their primary source of income, these extravagant suit-wearers are meant to, after a while, mock about their profession. Ergo, the laughs are to come easy, when customers or we are to enter their world. Cary Grant as the schemer is just like his character, pulling out tricks from his pocket keeping us engaged with provocatively negative innuendos. And despite of him having such an appealing persona, Rosalind Russell, the key of this enigma, steals the show. Her familiarity of the dirty game that she has been part of, and her unflinching reactions on getting her hands dirty boasts the film majorly. But I think it is the way she looks at Grant when she is busy or having a meltdown, showcasing how he is hers and how she is His Girl Friday.

    Grant relies more than Russell does on him, empowerment need not be so loud and cheesy, it can be flawed and nuanced as such. His Girl Friday Hawks has a deadline. And just like working at those late hours on Friday night, the director Howard Hawks, seems like he is always in a rush. Luckily, armed with a content so hefty and tone so crowd pleasing, the rush never overpowers the joy of watching two con artists con each other. And that is how good the performers are. The actors. Who themselves have a job to con, to do that purposefully, creates a bizarre play between reality and what they pretend to be, we as an audience, as a result, are having the time of our lives. The splashy humor is the only way this film would have worked. Focusing on an intensely delicate matter, the political satire that puts media and more importantly an authoritarian and his or her use or misuse of power is imply smart. To pin down that transition when an information is revealed, these opposite sides of the coin- drama and comedy- helps them immensely to enchant the viewers. What is joked about, shouldn't be joked about. But since it is their primary source of income, these extravagant suit-wearers are meant to, after a while, mock about their profession. Ergo, the laughs are to come easy, when customers or we are to enter their world. Cary Grant as the schemer is just like his character, pulling out tricks from his pocket keeping us engaged with provocatively negative innuendos. And despite of him having such an appealing persona, Rosalind Russell, the key of this enigma, steals the show. Her familiarity of the dirty game that she has been part of, and her unflinching reactions on getting her hands dirty boasts the film majorly. But I think it is the way she looks at Grant when she is busy or having a meltdown, showcasing how he is hers and how she is His Girl Friday.

  • Mar 10, 2019

    Absolutely brilliant dialogue. Great plot.

    Absolutely brilliant dialogue. Great plot.

  • Feb 11, 2019

    Smooth-talking press personalities from a bygone age, chasing each other's tails and trying to get in the last word amidst a riled-up crew of snappy, witty, improv-happy verbal maestros. The breakneck pace this film is able to maintain via dialog alone is just staggering, head-spinning to the point that I nearly lost track of what was going on with the plot while my brain tried to catch up with the last three or four punchlines. I wasn't prepared for that kind of an onslaught, and I wasn't alone: caught in the middle of all the chatter is Bruce, a mild-mannered everyman who just wants to be a nice guy, give his new fiancee time to say goodbye to her ex-husband and former coworkers, board a train and ride off into a bright, happy future of marital bliss. He's eaten alive, almost literally. The ex (Cary Grant at the height of his stardom) isn't quite ready to move on from that lost love, and though the fiancee (Rosalind Russell, in a show-stealing turn) is wise to his tricks, she (and Bruce) find themselves mired by them nonetheless. In the midst of a scheduled execution, a midnight prison break, late edition deadlines and bombshell headlines, the brusque, self-assured lady at the heart of this two-room maelstrom must choose between her lust for a juicy lead and the promise of a fresh start. A hilarious rush of con artistry and self-preservation that seems to have outlasted the very industry it lampoons. I donâ(TM)t think they make people like this any more, much less movies.

    Smooth-talking press personalities from a bygone age, chasing each other's tails and trying to get in the last word amidst a riled-up crew of snappy, witty, improv-happy verbal maestros. The breakneck pace this film is able to maintain via dialog alone is just staggering, head-spinning to the point that I nearly lost track of what was going on with the plot while my brain tried to catch up with the last three or four punchlines. I wasn't prepared for that kind of an onslaught, and I wasn't alone: caught in the middle of all the chatter is Bruce, a mild-mannered everyman who just wants to be a nice guy, give his new fiancee time to say goodbye to her ex-husband and former coworkers, board a train and ride off into a bright, happy future of marital bliss. He's eaten alive, almost literally. The ex (Cary Grant at the height of his stardom) isn't quite ready to move on from that lost love, and though the fiancee (Rosalind Russell, in a show-stealing turn) is wise to his tricks, she (and Bruce) find themselves mired by them nonetheless. In the midst of a scheduled execution, a midnight prison break, late edition deadlines and bombshell headlines, the brusque, self-assured lady at the heart of this two-room maelstrom must choose between her lust for a juicy lead and the promise of a fresh start. A hilarious rush of con artistry and self-preservation that seems to have outlasted the very industry it lampoons. I donâ(TM)t think they make people like this any more, much less movies.

  • Jan 26, 2019

    they don't make them like this anymore. almost the entire movie takes place in just one room. plus a guy who looks a lot like Ralph Bellamy.

    they don't make them like this anymore. almost the entire movie takes place in just one room. plus a guy who looks a lot like Ralph Bellamy.

  • Nov 11, 2018

    Smart, Rapid fire dialogue. Great movie.

    Smart, Rapid fire dialogue. Great movie.

  • Oct 09, 2018

    A good and clever script, but the ending is a bit weak

    A good and clever script, but the ending is a bit weak

  • Sep 30, 2018

    Classic screwball comedy on. One of the best of the 1940s

    Classic screwball comedy on. One of the best of the 1940s

  • Sep 26, 2018

    Typical Cary Grant film - witty and frivolous, though not his best

    Typical Cary Grant film - witty and frivolous, though not his best

  • Sep 22, 2018

    His Girl Friday: Pros: - Fantastic Acting - Amazing Directing - Terrific Script - Beautiful Cinematography - Magnificent Editing - Very Funny - Great Set Design - Outstanding Plot - Great chemistry between each character - Brilliant Pacing Overall Grade: A+ (10/10)

    His Girl Friday: Pros: - Fantastic Acting - Amazing Directing - Terrific Script - Beautiful Cinematography - Magnificent Editing - Very Funny - Great Set Design - Outstanding Plot - Great chemistry between each character - Brilliant Pacing Overall Grade: A+ (10/10)