Licence To Kill Reviews

  • Mar 28, 2021

    "License to kill" is Timothy Dalton's second and final James Bond outing and certainly one of the best Bond films made to date.  After recruiting his friend James Bond to help catch a notorious drug Lord , American C.I.A. agent Felix Lester is taken prisoner in a revenge attack. After Bond discovers Felix has gone missing and Felix's new wife has been killed, Bond learns of Sanchez's escape. Bond goes rogue and journeys to Sanchez's home in the Republic of Isthmus. Here Bond is taken on to Sanchez's staff in an undercover attempt to kill the drug Lord. This film is fast paced and action packed and for a Bond film quite dark. It does have some of the best on screen practical stunts and special effects of any film. Certainly the stunts are far better than any of the previous Bond films and the character development has taken Bond to much more gritty and realistic level.

    "License to kill" is Timothy Dalton's second and final James Bond outing and certainly one of the best Bond films made to date.  After recruiting his friend James Bond to help catch a notorious drug Lord , American C.I.A. agent Felix Lester is taken prisoner in a revenge attack. After Bond discovers Felix has gone missing and Felix's new wife has been killed, Bond learns of Sanchez's escape. Bond goes rogue and journeys to Sanchez's home in the Republic of Isthmus. Here Bond is taken on to Sanchez's staff in an undercover attempt to kill the drug Lord. This film is fast paced and action packed and for a Bond film quite dark. It does have some of the best on screen practical stunts and special effects of any film. Certainly the stunts are far better than any of the previous Bond films and the character development has taken Bond to much more gritty and realistic level.

  • Mar 16, 2021

    Weak second outing for Timothy Dalton. Disappointing after such a solid debut that they'd go this route. Licence To Kill plays out like an exaggerated episode of Miami Vice that crammed in practically every 80s trope they could. The film is extremely cheap looking, with set design that is like Barnaby Jones. It looks like a Miami Vice TV special starring James Bond. They probably could've stuck Bruce Willis in this film and had it be a Die Hard sequel with how it feels like a typical action flick of the time. They go to some really nice locations like Key West and Mexico City but they somehow made them look cheap and tawdry. They would later revisit Mexico City in Spectre and photograph it much better. The dialogue is also lacking. Everyone mostly speaks in one liners. Adds to how this feels like an exaggerated Miami Vice episode. Oh and they over produced the hell out of this movie despite the low budget. It gets ridiculous at times. There's even a cartoonish stunt of an oil tanker on 2 wheels and a tanker pops a wheelie. So many other cartoonish stunts like this take away from the realistic feel they were aiming for. The violence is extremely gratuitous and they could've seriously toned it down. This is a Bond movie and even the Daniel Craig Bond movies don't have the kind of grisly violence this movie contains like a man being shredded in a cocaine grinder complete with gore and shark maulings that happen on screen in full detail. It's at times like a snuff film with how gratuitous and graphic the violence is and how much emphasis is put on it. So unnecessary. Oh and the tone is all over the charts. It can't maintain a tone consistently enough. It goes from grim and dour to campy and silly too frequently to the point of being jarring. Just a really poor entry. Just watch The Living Daylights if you want to see Timothy Dalton as James Bond and avoid this one. They would handle the topics of revenge,going rogue and personal storylines better with the Daniel Craig movies than this failed experiment did.

    Weak second outing for Timothy Dalton. Disappointing after such a solid debut that they'd go this route. Licence To Kill plays out like an exaggerated episode of Miami Vice that crammed in practically every 80s trope they could. The film is extremely cheap looking, with set design that is like Barnaby Jones. It looks like a Miami Vice TV special starring James Bond. They probably could've stuck Bruce Willis in this film and had it be a Die Hard sequel with how it feels like a typical action flick of the time. They go to some really nice locations like Key West and Mexico City but they somehow made them look cheap and tawdry. They would later revisit Mexico City in Spectre and photograph it much better. The dialogue is also lacking. Everyone mostly speaks in one liners. Adds to how this feels like an exaggerated Miami Vice episode. Oh and they over produced the hell out of this movie despite the low budget. It gets ridiculous at times. There's even a cartoonish stunt of an oil tanker on 2 wheels and a tanker pops a wheelie. So many other cartoonish stunts like this take away from the realistic feel they were aiming for. The violence is extremely gratuitous and they could've seriously toned it down. This is a Bond movie and even the Daniel Craig Bond movies don't have the kind of grisly violence this movie contains like a man being shredded in a cocaine grinder complete with gore and shark maulings that happen on screen in full detail. It's at times like a snuff film with how gratuitous and graphic the violence is and how much emphasis is put on it. So unnecessary. Oh and the tone is all over the charts. It can't maintain a tone consistently enough. It goes from grim and dour to campy and silly too frequently to the point of being jarring. Just a really poor entry. Just watch The Living Daylights if you want to see Timothy Dalton as James Bond and avoid this one. They would handle the topics of revenge,going rogue and personal storylines better with the Daniel Craig movies than this failed experiment did.

  • Dec 24, 2020

    South Florida, an evil drug lord in a fictional country, and a revenge plot. Typical 80's macho-man action movie? Nah, it's Licence to Kill. Licence to Kill seems to be a response to the over-the-top action films of the day. It's an enjoyable watch with plenty of action. Yet, it doesn't seem to fit well with the entire Bond-style spy movie narrative. For starters, we get Bond on a basic cop-job after his friend's wife is murdered. He risks everything and goes rogue to get his revenge including risking his career (and jail time). But in the end, he doesn't face any consequences even though he's guilty of insubordination. This film is Timothy Dalton's serious take on Bond taken to another level. Gadgets and suavity are minimalized while brutality turned up a notch. Though not bad in itself, we've seen how this worked with Daniel Craig's portrayal of Bond. Yet, the film ditches the dark serious tone halfway through for some subplot of Bond trying to befriend his enemy. Speaking of enemies, Robert Davi's performance of Franz Sanchez is one of the best portrayals of a Bond villain I've seen. I say this even though adding in a Pablo Escobar-esque enemy doesn't feel very "Bond" to the franchise. Robert Davi plays his role with charm and cold sophistication. And we also get an added sneak peek of a young Benicio del Toro as the anti-Bond henchman Dario. Each time these guys came on screen, they dominated and commanded audiences' attention. And the Bond girls, oh my! We get a nice contrast of Pam Bouvier's (Carey Lowell) professionalism with Lupe Lamora's (Talisa Soto) hot emotionalism. Both girls stole the screen and audiences' hearts. Yet, there were some awkward moments of tension between the girls that had to be glossed over for the film to have a happy ending... Not to mention that awkward "I love James so much" bit. All in all, Licence to Kill is a solid action movie. It's a simple plot with a ton of action, explosions, and bad guys you don't feel sorry for. Licence to Kill fits right in with other 80's adrenaline-filled action movies at the time. But as a Bond film? I can't see it. 3/5. Good action, simple plot, doesn't feel real "Bond"

    South Florida, an evil drug lord in a fictional country, and a revenge plot. Typical 80's macho-man action movie? Nah, it's Licence to Kill. Licence to Kill seems to be a response to the over-the-top action films of the day. It's an enjoyable watch with plenty of action. Yet, it doesn't seem to fit well with the entire Bond-style spy movie narrative. For starters, we get Bond on a basic cop-job after his friend's wife is murdered. He risks everything and goes rogue to get his revenge including risking his career (and jail time). But in the end, he doesn't face any consequences even though he's guilty of insubordination. This film is Timothy Dalton's serious take on Bond taken to another level. Gadgets and suavity are minimalized while brutality turned up a notch. Though not bad in itself, we've seen how this worked with Daniel Craig's portrayal of Bond. Yet, the film ditches the dark serious tone halfway through for some subplot of Bond trying to befriend his enemy. Speaking of enemies, Robert Davi's performance of Franz Sanchez is one of the best portrayals of a Bond villain I've seen. I say this even though adding in a Pablo Escobar-esque enemy doesn't feel very "Bond" to the franchise. Robert Davi plays his role with charm and cold sophistication. And we also get an added sneak peek of a young Benicio del Toro as the anti-Bond henchman Dario. Each time these guys came on screen, they dominated and commanded audiences' attention. And the Bond girls, oh my! We get a nice contrast of Pam Bouvier's (Carey Lowell) professionalism with Lupe Lamora's (Talisa Soto) hot emotionalism. Both girls stole the screen and audiences' hearts. Yet, there were some awkward moments of tension between the girls that had to be glossed over for the film to have a happy ending... Not to mention that awkward "I love James so much" bit. All in all, Licence to Kill is a solid action movie. It's a simple plot with a ton of action, explosions, and bad guys you don't feel sorry for. Licence to Kill fits right in with other 80's adrenaline-filled action movies at the time. But as a Bond film? I can't see it. 3/5. Good action, simple plot, doesn't feel real "Bond"

  • Dec 18, 2020

    This movie may the best James Bond movie. Timothy Dalton doesn't get enough credit. He was probably the best Bond, and I wish he would have done more movies.

    This movie may the best James Bond movie. Timothy Dalton doesn't get enough credit. He was probably the best Bond, and I wish he would have done more movies.

  • Nov 25, 2020

    More darker tone results in the best Timothy Dalton led Bond vehicle.

    More darker tone results in the best Timothy Dalton led Bond vehicle.

  • Nov 14, 2020

    Oh is that why his name is "Leiter"?!

    Oh is that why his name is "Leiter"?!

  • Nov 11, 2020

    Some moments of levity that seem out of place given the darker overall tone place this outing a step down from its predecessor, The Living Daylights. Nevertheless, License to Kill is an action-packed thriller that shows a new side to Bond, a Bond driven by vengeance, and not merely an agent of Her Majesty's Secret Service. A fitting ending to the all-too-short Timothy Dalton era.

    Some moments of levity that seem out of place given the darker overall tone place this outing a step down from its predecessor, The Living Daylights. Nevertheless, License to Kill is an action-packed thriller that shows a new side to Bond, a Bond driven by vengeance, and not merely an agent of Her Majesty's Secret Service. A fitting ending to the all-too-short Timothy Dalton era.

  • Oct 19, 2020

    License To Kill is one of the better Bond films since the end of Sean Connery's reign. Like in The Living Daylights, Timothy Dalton did a decent job as Bond - at least on par, if not better than Roger Moore. The other acting was also good, and the characters weren't bad. The villain was an improvement over many previous villains, even though he was basically a generic drug lord. The plot was reasonable, although the wedding aspect at the beginning was a bit strange (e.g. what happened to Felix and his wife), and it made no sense how a drug lord escaped and yet barely anybody was going after him - just four guys. Then when they caught the drug lord, a whole army of authorities surrounded him. The idea of abandoning a very expensive lab was also ridiculous when it was just a small fire that probably could have been put out. The twist of Bond befriending the villain was a good one. The action had more explosions than the last film, and again there was a nice mix of different things happening. The cinematography was solid, and the soundtrack was decent. Definitely a Bond film worth watching.

    License To Kill is one of the better Bond films since the end of Sean Connery's reign. Like in The Living Daylights, Timothy Dalton did a decent job as Bond - at least on par, if not better than Roger Moore. The other acting was also good, and the characters weren't bad. The villain was an improvement over many previous villains, even though he was basically a generic drug lord. The plot was reasonable, although the wedding aspect at the beginning was a bit strange (e.g. what happened to Felix and his wife), and it made no sense how a drug lord escaped and yet barely anybody was going after him - just four guys. Then when they caught the drug lord, a whole army of authorities surrounded him. The idea of abandoning a very expensive lab was also ridiculous when it was just a small fire that probably could have been put out. The twist of Bond befriending the villain was a good one. The action had more explosions than the last film, and again there was a nice mix of different things happening. The cinematography was solid, and the soundtrack was decent. Definitely a Bond film worth watching.

  • Sep 30, 2020

    Dalton's best, much of the campiness hangover from the Moore era and The Living Daylights is gone and this is the first time we see Bond really go rogue on a personal assignment. The violence can be a little over the top but it does up the stakes and Sanchez is a very formidable villain. The grittiness is definitely welcome and a great early view of what Craig's tenure would bring. Q is fantastic in this and probably the best use of his character under Desmond Llewelyn.

    Dalton's best, much of the campiness hangover from the Moore era and The Living Daylights is gone and this is the first time we see Bond really go rogue on a personal assignment. The violence can be a little over the top but it does up the stakes and Sanchez is a very formidable villain. The grittiness is definitely welcome and a great early view of what Craig's tenure would bring. Q is fantastic in this and probably the best use of his character under Desmond Llewelyn.

  • Sep 20, 2020

    This is the most violent Bond film with fun action and massive explosions. Timothy Dalton is great as bond and I wished he could do more than 2 movies. the thing that annoyed me is I didn't like how they killed off the wife once they had the wedding.

    This is the most violent Bond film with fun action and massive explosions. Timothy Dalton is great as bond and I wished he could do more than 2 movies. the thing that annoyed me is I didn't like how they killed off the wife once they had the wedding.