Live Flesh (Carne trémula) Reviews

  • May 18, 2019

    tenho acompanhado o trabalho de Almodóvar recentemente. confesso que de todos os filmes que vi atï¿ 1/2 (C) agora, este foi o que mais gostei. Ironias, sexualidade e as cores sempre foram marcas registradas deve. e isso tbm pode ser visto neste filme. ainda assim o que mais me encontrou foi o processo de perseguição incansável de cada personagem em conseguir sua auto satisfação. alï¿ 1/2 (C)m disso, ficará ligado a todo momento na história muito bem contada e nas diversas reviravoltas! (marca registrada do diretor).

    tenho acompanhado o trabalho de Almodóvar recentemente. confesso que de todos os filmes que vi atï¿ 1/2 (C) agora, este foi o que mais gostei. Ironias, sexualidade e as cores sempre foram marcas registradas deve. e isso tbm pode ser visto neste filme. ainda assim o que mais me encontrou foi o processo de perseguição incansável de cada personagem em conseguir sua auto satisfação. alï¿ 1/2 (C)m disso, ficará ligado a todo momento na história muito bem contada e nas diversas reviravoltas! (marca registrada do diretor).

  • Avatar
    Sylvester K Super Reviewer
    Jul 18, 2016

    A Spanish melodrama about 5 people's lives being tangled in series of misunderstanding and deceit. I really enjoyed Almodovar's amazing storytelling techniques, the story itself was pretty darn complex too. Francesca Neri shone playing the seductive Elena while the overall ensemble had some strong chemistry. Some may enjoy the melodramatic ending while others may find it too telenovella-like.

    A Spanish melodrama about 5 people's lives being tangled in series of misunderstanding and deceit. I really enjoyed Almodovar's amazing storytelling techniques, the story itself was pretty darn complex too. Francesca Neri shone playing the seductive Elena while the overall ensemble had some strong chemistry. Some may enjoy the melodramatic ending while others may find it too telenovella-like.

  • Dec 21, 2015

    Not my favorite, as the characters were not as deeply drawn as other Almodovar characters. But still stunningly envisioned.

    Not my favorite, as the characters were not as deeply drawn as other Almodovar characters. But still stunningly envisioned.

  • Sep 04, 2015

    F 8.1 [Pedro Almodóvar]

    F 8.1 [Pedro Almodóvar]

  • Aug 08, 2015

    Me tendría que romper un poco la cabeza pensando en algún otro director que le tenga tanto amor a sus personajes y que les dé una importancia específica encada una de sus películas como Almodóvar... Me arrepiento de haber tardado tanto en ver esta joya de película... Con todo el estilo de su director y con actuaciones muy sobresalientes (desde Franesca Neri, guapísima, una de las chicas Almodóvar más bellas que yo haya visto... hasta Javier Bárdem), la música siempre atrapante de Alberto Iglesias; todo, todo funciona al servicio del sello Almodóvar... Tal vez no sea el argumento más audaz o la película más complicada de su director, pero no por ello deja de ser fascinante y de mostrar ya una madurez en el cine del español... Incluso, se da el lujo de dotarle un trasfondo político que cuaja de maravilla en la cinta... Bravísimo!!

    Me tendría que romper un poco la cabeza pensando en algún otro director que le tenga tanto amor a sus personajes y que les dé una importancia específica encada una de sus películas como Almodóvar... Me arrepiento de haber tardado tanto en ver esta joya de película... Con todo el estilo de su director y con actuaciones muy sobresalientes (desde Franesca Neri, guapísima, una de las chicas Almodóvar más bellas que yo haya visto... hasta Javier Bárdem), la música siempre atrapante de Alberto Iglesias; todo, todo funciona al servicio del sello Almodóvar... Tal vez no sea el argumento más audaz o la película más complicada de su director, pero no por ello deja de ser fascinante y de mostrar ya una madurez en el cine del español... Incluso, se da el lujo de dotarle un trasfondo político que cuaja de maravilla en la cinta... Bravísimo!!

  • Apr 22, 2015

    Engraçado que sempre ouvi falarem bem desse filme mas achei o argumento fraco. Ñe.

    Engraçado que sempre ouvi falarem bem desse filme mas achei o argumento fraco. Ñe.

  • Jan 28, 2015

    There are too many thrillers that want to be sexy and dramatic and stylish and smart, but with great disappointment, those "ands" turn into italicized "ors," as few artistic talents are capable of such an intricate juggling act. One too many "Basic Instinct"s walk out the door all dressed down in crotchless interrogations with little value to be held in the long run. Some directors are so self-conscious that they feel the need to grab a megaphone and loudly inform us that, that's right, they are aiming to be sexy and dramatic and stylish and smart. If only those damn "ors" would get out of the way for once. Few filmmakers, however, have the gutsy panache of Pedro Almodóvar, who possibly was the result of a lab experiment involving Alfred Hitchcock, Douglas Sirk, Brian De Palma, and the wardrobe of Endora from "Bewitched." His films range from candy colored to smokily noiry, sometimes carrying the weight of a Technicolor "Bringing Up Baby" or a severely darkened vintage women's picture. Though slightly flagrant, his projects maintain the professionalism of an auteur who simply knows what the hell he's doing. Take a film like "Live Flesh," which isn't quite sexy enough, soapy enough, violent enough, yet still manages to feel distinctly, no pun-intended, fleshed out. It's subdued, but it's carefully subdued. If we had the same old X-rated Sirk stuff like usual, we'd surely be tripping in a David LaChapelle styled hallucination. This time around, Almodóvar fabricates a complicated story of revenge, steamy trysts and deadly misunderstandings that hit all the right notes, even if those notes are all sharped and flatted; yet, it's his most mature film. The movie begins in 1970 with a theatrical birth in the back of a city bus; being welcomed into the world is Victor Plaza, the son of a prostitute (Penélope Cruz). Jump 20 years into the future: Victor (Liberto Rabal) is meeting Elena (Francesca Neri), a drug addict, for an impromptu date after hooking up a week previously. Elena was in the mood for a one-night stand, not a courtship - when Victor shows up to her apartment, she flies into a rage, threatening to shoot him in a fashion only Loretta Young could top. They get into a scuffle, leaving Elena unconscious while the gun flies out of her hands and accidentally fires. The downstairs neighbor hears, and, concerned, calls the police. The cops who arrive, the alcoholic, reckless Sancho (Jose Sancho) and the more proper David (Javier Bardem) attempt to calm the scene. Cut to yet another scuffle, David is shot in the back, paralyzed, while Victor is sent to prison for the next four years. But when he is released, he finds that David and Elena have married, leading to a series of events that could only be found in a classy telenovela. No matter how breathy and melodramatically enhanced the plot may at first sound, it is surely one of Almodóvar's most toned down films, both in terms of style and personality. Gone are the neons, artificial sets and delightfully wacky side-characters; gone is the tongue-in-cheek restlessness that made his films better-than-average Hollywood homages that were far too good to simply be called homages. In "Live Flesh," you take him seriously, viewing him as a director who has had plenty of fun in the past but wants to make something as substantial as his peers. Looking back, the film marked a turn in his career, shifting towards heavyweights like "All About My Mother" in 1999 and "Talk to Her" in 2002. Not to suggest that "Live Flesh" is sapped of any pleasures. The storyline is pleasingly hammy, with touches of unexpected realisms like wheelchair basketball and domestic abuse, and the performances are finely tuned. Even better is the cinematography (clearly influenced by Almodóvar himself), which hangs onto the bodies of the actors like a fixated Michelangelo; whether they're silhouetted, in the nude, or clothed in cheetah prints, there is an added lustiness that heightens the frequent sexual tensions the film constantly revisits. "Live Flesh" is a sumptuously shot throwback of a romantic thriller, evidence of a director with pop arted ambitions taking a risky turn that pays off.

    There are too many thrillers that want to be sexy and dramatic and stylish and smart, but with great disappointment, those "ands" turn into italicized "ors," as few artistic talents are capable of such an intricate juggling act. One too many "Basic Instinct"s walk out the door all dressed down in crotchless interrogations with little value to be held in the long run. Some directors are so self-conscious that they feel the need to grab a megaphone and loudly inform us that, that's right, they are aiming to be sexy and dramatic and stylish and smart. If only those damn "ors" would get out of the way for once. Few filmmakers, however, have the gutsy panache of Pedro Almodóvar, who possibly was the result of a lab experiment involving Alfred Hitchcock, Douglas Sirk, Brian De Palma, and the wardrobe of Endora from "Bewitched." His films range from candy colored to smokily noiry, sometimes carrying the weight of a Technicolor "Bringing Up Baby" or a severely darkened vintage women's picture. Though slightly flagrant, his projects maintain the professionalism of an auteur who simply knows what the hell he's doing. Take a film like "Live Flesh," which isn't quite sexy enough, soapy enough, violent enough, yet still manages to feel distinctly, no pun-intended, fleshed out. It's subdued, but it's carefully subdued. If we had the same old X-rated Sirk stuff like usual, we'd surely be tripping in a David LaChapelle styled hallucination. This time around, Almodóvar fabricates a complicated story of revenge, steamy trysts and deadly misunderstandings that hit all the right notes, even if those notes are all sharped and flatted; yet, it's his most mature film. The movie begins in 1970 with a theatrical birth in the back of a city bus; being welcomed into the world is Victor Plaza, the son of a prostitute (Penélope Cruz). Jump 20 years into the future: Victor (Liberto Rabal) is meeting Elena (Francesca Neri), a drug addict, for an impromptu date after hooking up a week previously. Elena was in the mood for a one-night stand, not a courtship - when Victor shows up to her apartment, she flies into a rage, threatening to shoot him in a fashion only Loretta Young could top. They get into a scuffle, leaving Elena unconscious while the gun flies out of her hands and accidentally fires. The downstairs neighbor hears, and, concerned, calls the police. The cops who arrive, the alcoholic, reckless Sancho (Jose Sancho) and the more proper David (Javier Bardem) attempt to calm the scene. Cut to yet another scuffle, David is shot in the back, paralyzed, while Victor is sent to prison for the next four years. But when he is released, he finds that David and Elena have married, leading to a series of events that could only be found in a classy telenovela. No matter how breathy and melodramatically enhanced the plot may at first sound, it is surely one of Almodóvar's most toned down films, both in terms of style and personality. Gone are the neons, artificial sets and delightfully wacky side-characters; gone is the tongue-in-cheek restlessness that made his films better-than-average Hollywood homages that were far too good to simply be called homages. In "Live Flesh," you take him seriously, viewing him as a director who has had plenty of fun in the past but wants to make something as substantial as his peers. Looking back, the film marked a turn in his career, shifting towards heavyweights like "All About My Mother" in 1999 and "Talk to Her" in 2002. Not to suggest that "Live Flesh" is sapped of any pleasures. The storyline is pleasingly hammy, with touches of unexpected realisms like wheelchair basketball and domestic abuse, and the performances are finely tuned. Even better is the cinematography (clearly influenced by Almodóvar himself), which hangs onto the bodies of the actors like a fixated Michelangelo; whether they're silhouetted, in the nude, or clothed in cheetah prints, there is an added lustiness that heightens the frequent sexual tensions the film constantly revisits. "Live Flesh" is a sumptuously shot throwback of a romantic thriller, evidence of a director with pop arted ambitions taking a risky turn that pays off.

  • Dec 28, 2014

    It's remarkable how Almodovar can always link up all those characters and their stories together to make it into a wonderful movie.

    It's remarkable how Almodovar can always link up all those characters and their stories together to make it into a wonderful movie.

  • Jul 15, 2014

    One of the better Almodovar movies that I've seen. It never gets into the over the top melodrama that is so abundant in his work. Good performances, good script, good movie.

    One of the better Almodovar movies that I've seen. It never gets into the over the top melodrama that is so abundant in his work. Good performances, good script, good movie.

  • Jason 123 D Super Reviewer
    Apr 08, 2014

    Finally an incredible film from Almodóvar. Everything up to this point has failed to impress me considering how revered he is. When he can make a film like this I understand why critics like him. This is the first truly great film from Almodóvar.

    Finally an incredible film from Almodóvar. Everything up to this point has failed to impress me considering how revered he is. When he can make a film like this I understand why critics like him. This is the first truly great film from Almodóvar.