Naqoyqatsi (Naqoyqatsi: Life as War) Reviews

  • Jan 13, 2020

    A weak ending to a beautiful trilogy but powerful nevertheless. For those new to the series, check out Koyaanisqatsi before seeing this one. 3.5/5. Felt as if it's riding the success of the first film but still had strong social commentary.

    A weak ending to a beautiful trilogy but powerful nevertheless. For those new to the series, check out Koyaanisqatsi before seeing this one. 3.5/5. Felt as if it's riding the success of the first film but still had strong social commentary.

  • Jul 15, 2019

    I remeber watching "Koyaanisqatsi" many years ago. It was one of the first expermiental films I saw and I was mind blown. The score helped a lot, but the imagery was powerful, interesting and very fascinating. I've been on the lookout for "Powaqqatsi" and this film ever since. but this was a big let down. It feels a bit dated. The computer stuff and animated moments is almost embarrassing for today's standards, but I guess I really can't blame Reggio for this. The main problem is the often shifting clips, often uninteresting - giving me little to no message. Sure I get the technology and violence stuff, and there is some pretty visuals here once in a while. The score is also rather boring for me - Glass missed a bit here, and the color reversing flips get's tiring and it does not look cool. I found the part with sliding wax faces of presidents and the sudden appearing of Trump rather impressive, but that's about it. Sure, I will give "Powaqqatsi" a go when I get the chance, but this was not a big hit for me, sadly, and I found it way to easy to look away from, and when my eyes returned to screen it never lasted long. 3 out of 10 punchline lacking montages.

    I remeber watching "Koyaanisqatsi" many years ago. It was one of the first expermiental films I saw and I was mind blown. The score helped a lot, but the imagery was powerful, interesting and very fascinating. I've been on the lookout for "Powaqqatsi" and this film ever since. but this was a big let down. It feels a bit dated. The computer stuff and animated moments is almost embarrassing for today's standards, but I guess I really can't blame Reggio for this. The main problem is the often shifting clips, often uninteresting - giving me little to no message. Sure I get the technology and violence stuff, and there is some pretty visuals here once in a while. The score is also rather boring for me - Glass missed a bit here, and the color reversing flips get's tiring and it does not look cool. I found the part with sliding wax faces of presidents and the sudden appearing of Trump rather impressive, but that's about it. Sure, I will give "Powaqqatsi" a go when I get the chance, but this was not a big hit for me, sadly, and I found it way to easy to look away from, and when my eyes returned to screen it never lasted long. 3 out of 10 punchline lacking montages.

  • Carlos M Super Reviewer
    Dec 03, 2018

    Reggio's psychedelic use of visual effects is quite bold considering how dated they may certainly look for many today (although I see them more as vintage effects), and we find more cohesion here than in Powaqqatsi, even if the result becomes equally loose and repetitious after a while.

    Reggio's psychedelic use of visual effects is quite bold considering how dated they may certainly look for many today (although I see them more as vintage effects), and we find more cohesion here than in Powaqqatsi, even if the result becomes equally loose and repetitious after a while.

  • Dec 02, 2016

    Definitely the most straightforward of the three movies with a lot of stock footage. I did like the soundtrack though.

    Definitely the most straightforward of the three movies with a lot of stock footage. I did like the soundtrack though.

  • Jun 08, 2016

    This opus of the cult classic trilogy "Qatsi" by legendary cinematographer and film director Godfrey Reggio. This final chapter is unfortunately very disappointing in the inevitable comparison to the original Koyaanisqatsi, released in 1983. Focusing on technology and it's huge influence on our culture, how we have fashioned the world to our desires instead of living symbiotically with it is quite magnificent visually at times but feels terribly empty and slow. The long series of shots on children's faces become a little annoying after a while in my opinion. The strength of the first film was to make us travel and see the vastness and beauty of the world. In this third film , i fail to see the same enchantment in the technological achievements of men. Looking at machines and warehouses does not exactly trigger my mojo, but i agree upon the fact that some may find it fascinating. It was interesting but the film failed to dazzle me as much as the original did.

    This opus of the cult classic trilogy "Qatsi" by legendary cinematographer and film director Godfrey Reggio. This final chapter is unfortunately very disappointing in the inevitable comparison to the original Koyaanisqatsi, released in 1983. Focusing on technology and it's huge influence on our culture, how we have fashioned the world to our desires instead of living symbiotically with it is quite magnificent visually at times but feels terribly empty and slow. The long series of shots on children's faces become a little annoying after a while in my opinion. The strength of the first film was to make us travel and see the vastness and beauty of the world. In this third film , i fail to see the same enchantment in the technological achievements of men. Looking at machines and warehouses does not exactly trigger my mojo, but i agree upon the fact that some may find it fascinating. It was interesting but the film failed to dazzle me as much as the original did.

  • Sep 19, 2015

    While Koyaanisqatsi and Powaqqatsi are so thematically focussed that they gel together comfortably as two halves of one immense work, Naqoyqatsi flounders all over the place.

    While Koyaanisqatsi and Powaqqatsi are so thematically focussed that they gel together comfortably as two halves of one immense work, Naqoyqatsi flounders all over the place.

  • Jul 31, 2014

    The last of the trilogy is very dark and difficult to watch.

    The last of the trilogy is very dark and difficult to watch.

  • Dec 05, 2013

    NAQOYQATSI is the third installment in a trilogy by Godfrey Reggio and Philip Glass that began with KOYAANISQATSI. It is a documentary (loosely so) that examines globalization, technology, and violence in a rather oblique way that uses image juxtaposition to make its points. And, for the duration of the film, is accompanied by a Philip Glass score. I only recently saw KOYAANISQATSI, which I thought was ok. I didn't completely "get" it, but the title's meaning at the end did help a little bit, in retrospect. For me, the meaning of NAQOYQATSI was a little more clear from the outset, as the idea of technological advances alternately helping and harming humanity isn't really anything new, having been addressed in a many a sci-fi film before and since. The film is divided into different segments, with each one going into a different aspect of technology or violence in human society. From all of the imagery, I gleaned that technological advances have created a passive, spectator society that, despite being able to move rapidly, still isn't going anywhere. We have also cultivated a society in which we obsess over superficial things, as well as worship power, fame, and money; and the advent of mass media has only entrenched this further. There was also images relating to the destructive power of technology, and its contribution to/role in real-world violence (juxtaposed with videogame violence). All things considered, there is a lot to digest here, which would seem to indicate that this film requires multiple viewings to take all of it in. Still, I feel like the film lacked a strong through-line and cohesive message. Granted, the segments work individually, but taken as a whole, it smacks of throwing everything at the wall and seeing what sticks. Overall, I would place this on a level a little below KOYAANISQATSI, from which it seemed to recycle a bit of thematic material. It is well-made and contains some good bits of message, but none of the observations are that original and it didn't quite gel into a cohesive whole.

    NAQOYQATSI is the third installment in a trilogy by Godfrey Reggio and Philip Glass that began with KOYAANISQATSI. It is a documentary (loosely so) that examines globalization, technology, and violence in a rather oblique way that uses image juxtaposition to make its points. And, for the duration of the film, is accompanied by a Philip Glass score. I only recently saw KOYAANISQATSI, which I thought was ok. I didn't completely "get" it, but the title's meaning at the end did help a little bit, in retrospect. For me, the meaning of NAQOYQATSI was a little more clear from the outset, as the idea of technological advances alternately helping and harming humanity isn't really anything new, having been addressed in a many a sci-fi film before and since. The film is divided into different segments, with each one going into a different aspect of technology or violence in human society. From all of the imagery, I gleaned that technological advances have created a passive, spectator society that, despite being able to move rapidly, still isn't going anywhere. We have also cultivated a society in which we obsess over superficial things, as well as worship power, fame, and money; and the advent of mass media has only entrenched this further. There was also images relating to the destructive power of technology, and its contribution to/role in real-world violence (juxtaposed with videogame violence). All things considered, there is a lot to digest here, which would seem to indicate that this film requires multiple viewings to take all of it in. Still, I feel like the film lacked a strong through-line and cohesive message. Granted, the segments work individually, but taken as a whole, it smacks of throwing everything at the wall and seeing what sticks. Overall, I would place this on a level a little below KOYAANISQATSI, from which it seemed to recycle a bit of thematic material. It is well-made and contains some good bits of message, but none of the observations are that original and it didn't quite gel into a cohesive whole.

  • Jul 28, 2013

    The final film in the trilogy, but it sort of suffers from the rule of diminishing returns, and the addition of computer graphics this time around sort of put me off completely. Rental?

    The final film in the trilogy, but it sort of suffers from the rule of diminishing returns, and the addition of computer graphics this time around sort of put me off completely. Rental?

  • Jul 07, 2013

    Unconventionally refreshing and very powerful. Beautiful requiem, Media Weather, highlights the theme of exploitation, an engine that bombards us with nearly useless information. Apocalyptic Intensive Time warns the audience that our civilization never fails at betrayal. We can only hope that its scale never reaches totally devastating. Cynical, morbid, and utterly beautiful.

    Unconventionally refreshing and very powerful. Beautiful requiem, Media Weather, highlights the theme of exploitation, an engine that bombards us with nearly useless information. Apocalyptic Intensive Time warns the audience that our civilization never fails at betrayal. We can only hope that its scale never reaches totally devastating. Cynical, morbid, and utterly beautiful.