Nine - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Nine Reviews

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July 7, 2016
Der italienische Regisseur Guido Contini hat eine wirkliche Schreibblockade. Ausgerechnet jetzt, wo er Planmässig einen neuen Film vorbereiten sollte. Seine Muse Claudia ist schon nach Italien gereist, um in seinem neuen Film mitzuwirken. Seine Frau Luisa hintergeht er mit einer Affäre, mit Carla. Auch das kommt nicht besonders gut an. Mehr und mehr verliert sich Guido in Tagträumerei. Bis es zum grossen Knall am Schluss kommt.
Das ist eine Geschichte, dass der Regisseur Rob Marshall gerne als Vorlage benutzt. Seine Figuren sind schrill. Auch ein bisschen durch den Wind. Die Farben und das Set sind bunt gestaltet. Auch viele Stars spielen in seinen Filmen immer mit. Aber am liebsten verfilmt er Musicals. Das sah man in den Filmen Into the Woods" mit Johnny Depp und Meryl Streep. Sein grösster Erfolg war aber Chicago". Dabei holte er sogar mehrere Oscars.
Leider ist diese Geschichte nicht ganz so gut ausgefallen. Auch wenn wieder viele grosse Stars mitspielen, bleiben sie nur an der Oberfläche. Daniel Day-Lewis ist einer der grossen Schauspieler, aber als feurigen Italiener kommt er leider nicht durch. Seine Co-Stars wie Marion Cotillard, Judy Dench, Kate Hudson und Nicole Kidman, bleiben auf der Strecke und wirken ermüdend. Die einzige, die ein bisschen Feuer im Hintern hat, ist Penelope Cruz. Man merkt schon, dass sie ein feuriges und spanisches Temperament hat.
Es ist zwar schön dabei zuzusehen, wie die Darsteller singen und tanzen. Nur leider war die Musikauswahl, auch nicht besonders gut. Die Lieder greifen einen leider nicht und man bleibt emotionslos.
Fazit: Ein Film mit vielen guten Darstellern, die leider in einem oberflächlichen Film singen und tanzen!
March 28, 2016
A musical starring Day-Lewis with performances from Dench and Kidman, what's not to like? Well actually quite a lot if there was ever a film made for style over substance this is it. You don't feel anything towards the characters and quite frankly the film became very boring and quite rarely i found myself wondering why I even bothered watching to the end.
March 15, 2016
I loved this - being a fan of both musicals and classic Italian neo-realist cinema - a grand tribute. Daniel Day-Lewis, Penelope Cruz & Marion Cotillard were fantastic, great to see Italian cinema's goddess, Sophia Loren, back on the screen, and even Judi Dench, who I don't usually care for, was a pleasure to watch. I can see why it wasn't a massive hit though, as it's very long and doesn't have much plot. Fellini's 8 1/2, the original film, had a lot to say about Italian society in the 50s & 60s, but this is more of a homage to Neo-Realism - and delightful as it is, it's a bit pointless. However, who cares about that when the music, cast and photography is so breathtaking. Also very thought-provoking on the battle of the sexes, and celebrity - two issues which are as resonant today as they were in 1960.
½ December 29, 2015
You leave "Nine" not with a strong taste of dislike in your mouth but one of disappointment - with a cast, premise, and director this good, you expect it to be a musical masterpiece in a cinematic territory where there aren't any musicals to compare it to. But it features no good songs, several clunkily placed musical numbers, and more than a few actors that are either miscast or relatively pointless to the arc of the storyline. With all the iconoclasts involved, a single question percolates in our mind: what happened?
I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that "Nine" is an adaptation of the stage musical of the same name, which, in itself is a remake, or, at least, an homage to Federico Fellini's iconic 1963 film "8 1/2." I can imagine it working much better as a play, where musical interludes can flow in and out of the area with ease and where melodramatic artifice is relatively expected.
But as a movie, "Nine" pays more attention to where it comes from than it does to its source, capturing none of the color left behind by "8 1/2." Its lack of an emotional tug causes one to question whether it actually has to be filmed as a musical at all - we often times find that, just as dramatic scenes are beginning to gain momentum, interruption is caused by the inclusion of a performative dream world. It's a maddening case of a good film buried underneath a mixed up, persistently fallacious one.
A major point of concern also comes from the casting of Daniel Day-Lewis, who, by no means, gives a bad performance - he is just miscast, to a distracting degree. An English method actor portraying an Italian director? It doesn't work. (I echo the sentiments of Roger Ebert, who suggests Javier Bardem or Gael Garcia Bernal in the role.) Day-Lewis plays the film's protagonist, Guido Cantini, a filmmaker who has touched greatness in the past but has begun the process of slipping in recent years. His latest, titled "Italia," is without a script or any form of a concept - and though his muse (Nicole Kidman) is ready to headline, it soon becomes obvious that he's using the project as a way to shield himself from the harsh truths of his personal life.
His wife, former actress Luisa (Marion Cotillard), is growing tired of the way he selfishly moves about life, caring about his happiness, his love, but not hers; his mistress, the fiery Carla (Penélope Cruz), has been with him long enough to crave commitment, tiring of late-night rendezvous and ready for a relationship they can celebrate openly. Audiences bombard him with declarations that they love his older movies, not what he has to say today.
So as doubts pile and concerns from his colleagues mount, Guido soon finds himself in the midst of a midlife crisis. Though he would rather die than admit it, pausing his professional life and taking a second to reflect on his personal one might be the only way he can claw his way back up to the top. The path is treading down leads to self-destruction, and a talent so great cannot waste artistic merit.
"Nine" has the workings of a gigantically investing storyline (just look at the greatness of "8 1/2"), but Rob Marshall's unwise decision to take musical sequences to completely different locations causes the continuity of the film to suffer. While the best examples of the genre put a spotlight on the tireless trope of a character's ability to suddenly break out into song, song-and-dance numbers are located on what appears to be a stage, completely separate from the scene in store and therefore diminishing our interest in what was happening before it. Worse, the songs are graceless (the lyrics directly reflecting the situation in awkward poetic nature rather than utilizing the art of the metaphor), the choreography coming with them slightly inspired but, more often than not, too stagey, too (pardon the term) corny.
The film would be better off as a straight drama with a more fitting leading man - if being a musical is too desperate a thing, more sequential would be numbers that take place within the same world the characters live in, not somewhere floating in a fantasyland of masterful set design.
But movie isn't all wasted potential, and that's due to its women, who are the best thing about "Nine." With the exception of Kate Hudson and Fergie, who stun with their singing talents but are ultimately pointless (the writers' fault), the actresses are phenomenal. Penélope Cruz, Oscar-nominated for the film, makes a bold impression, especially in her Rita Hayworth on acid musical sequence, and Marion Cotillard, who dreamt of making a Hollywood musical for years before the film's release, proves herself to be a sublime singer while also stretching her abilities in American cinema. Kidman is chic and solid as Guido's toothsome muse, Judi Dench is believably wise as his concerned personal assistant, and Sophia Loren causes one to desire she had more screen-time as our hero's mother.
Everything else about "Nine," however, needs work - we're left feeling rather empty because we can imagine the film it might have been had it been directed and written by people with steadier humanistic touches and a lot less of an obsession with making things big and bold. Still, the actresses are ridiculously good, and I'm not planning on discounting their work anytime soon just because the men surrounding them don't seem to know what the hell to do with them.
December 26, 2015
Bah to the critics...
Super Reviewer
December 17, 2015
Glamour, beauty and half a dozen Oscar winners starring in a Broadway musical based on Fellini, so what could go wrong? Well, the movie is a total bore, pure style over no substance. Mostly all songs are annoying, everything is so cold and distant and I couldn't wait to see it end.
August 18, 2015
The worst musical I have ever seen
April 29, 2015
A beautiful failure, Nine is a snooze.
April 19, 2015
Very flat. The cast is great, the location is beautiful and most of the songs are catchy, but Nine completely lacks depth and ends up being a movie about nothing, really. See Federico Fellini's 8 1/2 instead. It's not a musical, but it's what Nine is based on and it's SO MUCH BETTER.
April 15, 2015
Too stagey to justify its existence in this medium, "Nine" is content to simply overwhelm its audience with overstated art direction and bombastic performances, never attempting to find any semblance of human emotion or truth in all of the spectacle.
March 21, 2015
Great looking cast and a well made song but the movie is very dull.
½ March 18, 2015
Chicago is a better production by the same director.
March 9, 2015
off course I want!!! ;)
March 5, 2015
So boring that I nearly fell asleep during it.
January 20, 2015
Fiasco de Rob Marshall a pesar del reparto estelar.
½ September 16, 2014
There is style, great set design, and a dream cast, but in the end it just amounts to a total mess. It seemed like all the ingredients were there, and perhaps something got lost during the editing, but the end product is as incohesive as a film could be. The best part of this film is the trailer that combined all the best parts in 2 minutes.
September 5, 2014
An unredeemable lead character distracts beautiful and catchy musical numbers, making for an odd experience.
August 11, 2014
I don't really know much about this, but Daniel Day-Lewis + musical = win-win.
August 8, 2014
it's ok movie. not like Chicago that I like more.
only two shows I liked in this movie.
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