Spotlight Reviews

  • Oct 09, 2019

    An important film...it treads its difficult subject matter with respect and dignity.

    An important film...it treads its difficult subject matter with respect and dignity.

  • Oct 06, 2019

    The best newsroom procedural i have ever seen. These people set aside their personal lives to report a story that changed the world. Stopped evil in the name of good. The way they portrayed the new Jewish editor from Florida was so understated. So real. What a great movie!

    The best newsroom procedural i have ever seen. These people set aside their personal lives to report a story that changed the world. Stopped evil in the name of good. The way they portrayed the new Jewish editor from Florida was so understated. So real. What a great movie!

  • Sep 18, 2019

    This movie is just mindblowing for me, not just the story but the performance from the casts too, Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams and Stanley Tucci played a big part that makes this movie so meaningful for me. And don't forget there's Brian d'Arcy, Liev Schreiber, and John Slattery that has a scene that steal the show for me, their role maybe not that big but believe me, every one of them is just so good in this movie. A must see film with amazing performance from everyone since The Departed. 5/5

    This movie is just mindblowing for me, not just the story but the performance from the casts too, Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams and Stanley Tucci played a big part that makes this movie so meaningful for me. And don't forget there's Brian d'Arcy, Liev Schreiber, and John Slattery that has a scene that steal the show for me, their role maybe not that big but believe me, every one of them is just so good in this movie. A must see film with amazing performance from everyone since The Departed. 5/5

  • Sep 12, 2019

    What they did with the story was close to brilliant. Although there was not too much happening on screen, they managed to create a dense and believable atmosphere.

    What they did with the story was close to brilliant. Although there was not too much happening on screen, they managed to create a dense and believable atmosphere.

  • Sep 11, 2019

    A story worth watching! Great!

    A story worth watching! Great!

  • Aug 14, 2019

    good cast and a great story based on real life story in Boston about the Catholic church

    good cast and a great story based on real life story in Boston about the Catholic church

  • Jul 15, 2019

    Following in the footsteps of other journalistic drama greats like "All The President's Men" and "The Insider" before it, this Best Picture winner takes an incredibly engrossing story of investigative passion and layers a thick coating of moral intrigue and subtle, yet effective emotionality on top of it. Sure, "Spotlight" may lack the directorial panache and flair that other, admittedly more complete films would possess, but I'll be damned if the subject matter at hand doesn't elevate everything in play. I don't need this to be flashy or expressive. The message and story at hand do it all for me. And what a story it is, scripted beautifully by Josh Singer and director Tom McCarthy, featuring stellar dialogue, brilliantly vibrant scene dynamics, and -- again -- a call to action that'll knock you on your back. "Spotlight" shocked me in nearly every way imaginable. Not only is it a well-deserved candidate for the best movie of 2015, it's a well-deserved candidate for being one of the best movies of its kind.

    Following in the footsteps of other journalistic drama greats like "All The President's Men" and "The Insider" before it, this Best Picture winner takes an incredibly engrossing story of investigative passion and layers a thick coating of moral intrigue and subtle, yet effective emotionality on top of it. Sure, "Spotlight" may lack the directorial panache and flair that other, admittedly more complete films would possess, but I'll be damned if the subject matter at hand doesn't elevate everything in play. I don't need this to be flashy or expressive. The message and story at hand do it all for me. And what a story it is, scripted beautifully by Josh Singer and director Tom McCarthy, featuring stellar dialogue, brilliantly vibrant scene dynamics, and -- again -- a call to action that'll knock you on your back. "Spotlight" shocked me in nearly every way imaginable. Not only is it a well-deserved candidate for the best movie of 2015, it's a well-deserved candidate for being one of the best movies of its kind.

  • Jul 14, 2019

    Great casting though I think that McAdams could've done a better job

    Great casting though I think that McAdams could've done a better job

  • Jun 23, 2019

    Really well done. Amazing so many people would look the other way.

    Really well done. Amazing so many people would look the other way.

  • Jun 20, 2019

    As I've watched an ever-increasing number of films across a variety of genres, I've come to the conclusion that the investigative drama is one of my favorite genres. My favorite movies in this genre are those which are simultaneously low key and suspenseful. Films such as The Third Murder, Rear Window, and The Conversation maintain high levels of tension with a minimum of onscreen violence, achieving the type of audience engagement I'd associate with a high body count thriller with a more measured, intellectual tone. Spotlight is, undoubtedly, one of the best films of the genre I've ever seen. Following the titular "Spotlight" team from The Boston Globe as they investigate what could be the biggest story of their career, a child abuse scandal involving the Catholic Church, the film is extremely tense, yet simultaneously low key, creating an extremely engaging drama without sacrificing the air of authenticity demanded by an adaptation of a true story. The movie features one of the strongest ensemble casts I have ever seen, to the point that pointing out standouts is very hard because of the inspired performances all around. In a clever bit of directing, these characters are frequently towered over by edifices symbolizing the very organization the team is investigating as they exchange dialogue. This dialogue is engaging not just because of the acting prowess on display, but also because movie also has an excellent script. I particularly like the use of subtext and doublespeak in the film. While the film does not convey as many layers of meaning in a single sentence as Tokyo Story, which I have praised for similar reasons, it acknowledges that it is often counterproductive for a reporter to get accusatory and openly angry with interviewees and that, for the person on the other end of the notepad, threats should not be made openly and publicly, especially towards someone in the position to publish those threats. These are aspects of the profession commonly ignored by films featuring reporters. I suspect some people will find the film to be anti-religious. I didn't get that impression. Spotlight certainly does not portray the Catholic Church as an institution in a positive manner, but it does not attack its God directly, only the mortals ostensibly in God's service. Throughout the film, the "Spotlight" team conduct repeated telephone interviews with a former Catholic priest who became a critic of the Church due to their handling of sexual abuse claims. He has little positive to say about the people running the church, but still considers himself a Catholic. Even if we assume the existence of an infallible god, humans, those who claim to be servants of that deity may still commit immoral actions, and those acts should not be excused because the evildoer is a priest. Spotlight takes no definite stance on religion, only on those who use it to conceal their own evil acts.

    As I've watched an ever-increasing number of films across a variety of genres, I've come to the conclusion that the investigative drama is one of my favorite genres. My favorite movies in this genre are those which are simultaneously low key and suspenseful. Films such as The Third Murder, Rear Window, and The Conversation maintain high levels of tension with a minimum of onscreen violence, achieving the type of audience engagement I'd associate with a high body count thriller with a more measured, intellectual tone. Spotlight is, undoubtedly, one of the best films of the genre I've ever seen. Following the titular "Spotlight" team from The Boston Globe as they investigate what could be the biggest story of their career, a child abuse scandal involving the Catholic Church, the film is extremely tense, yet simultaneously low key, creating an extremely engaging drama without sacrificing the air of authenticity demanded by an adaptation of a true story. The movie features one of the strongest ensemble casts I have ever seen, to the point that pointing out standouts is very hard because of the inspired performances all around. In a clever bit of directing, these characters are frequently towered over by edifices symbolizing the very organization the team is investigating as they exchange dialogue. This dialogue is engaging not just because of the acting prowess on display, but also because movie also has an excellent script. I particularly like the use of subtext and doublespeak in the film. While the film does not convey as many layers of meaning in a single sentence as Tokyo Story, which I have praised for similar reasons, it acknowledges that it is often counterproductive for a reporter to get accusatory and openly angry with interviewees and that, for the person on the other end of the notepad, threats should not be made openly and publicly, especially towards someone in the position to publish those threats. These are aspects of the profession commonly ignored by films featuring reporters. I suspect some people will find the film to be anti-religious. I didn't get that impression. Spotlight certainly does not portray the Catholic Church as an institution in a positive manner, but it does not attack its God directly, only the mortals ostensibly in God's service. Throughout the film, the "Spotlight" team conduct repeated telephone interviews with a former Catholic priest who became a critic of the Church due to their handling of sexual abuse claims. He has little positive to say about the people running the church, but still considers himself a Catholic. Even if we assume the existence of an infallible god, humans, those who claim to be servants of that deity may still commit immoral actions, and those acts should not be excused because the evildoer is a priest. Spotlight takes no definite stance on religion, only on those who use it to conceal their own evil acts.