Reviews

  • Oct 17, 2021

    This is definitely in the top 100 worst films of all time. It's basically The Room: Star Wars Edition.

    This is definitely in the top 100 worst films of all time. It's basically The Room: Star Wars Edition.

  • Jun 14, 2021

    The horror, the horror

    The horror, the horror

  • Apr 14, 2021

    Oof, thar was rotten.

    Oof, thar was rotten.

  • Mar 30, 2021

    oh, has there ever been a more maligned piece of filmmaking than this? Abominable.

    oh, has there ever been a more maligned piece of filmmaking than this? Abominable.

  • Feb 14, 2021

    The most phenomenal art piece I have experienced in my life. God, in monotheistic thought, is conceived of as the supreme being, creator, and principal object of faith. God is usually conceived of as being omnipotent (all-powerful), omniscient (all-knowing), omnipresent (all-present) and omnibenevolent (all-good) as well as having an eternal and necessary existence. God is most often held to be incorporeal (immaterial). God's incorporeality or corporeality is related to conceptions of God's transcendence (being outside nature) or immanence (being in nature); Chinese theology exhibits a synthesis of both notions. Some religions describe God without reference to gender, while others use terminology that is gender-specific and gender-biased. God has been conceived as either personal or impersonal. In theism, God is the creator and sustainer of the universe, while in deism, God is the creator, but not the sustainer, of the universe. In pantheism, God is the universe itself. Atheism is an absence of belief in God, while agnosticism deems the existence of God unknown or unknowable. God has also been conceived as the source of all moral obligation, and the "greatest conceivable existent". Many notable philosophers have developed arguments for and against the existence of God. Monotheistic religions refer to their god using various names, some referring to cultural ideas about their god's identity and attributes. In ancient Egyptian Atenism, possibly the earliest recorded monotheistic religion, this deity was called Aten and proclaimed to be the one "true" Supreme Being and creator of the universe. In the Hebrew Bible and Judaism, the names of God include Elohim, Adonai, YHWH (Hebrew: יהוה‎) and others. Yahweh and Jehovah, possible vocalizations of YHWH, are used in Christianity. In the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, one God coexists in three "persons" called the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. In Islam, the name Allah is used, while Muslims also use a multitude of titles for God. In Hinduism, Brahman is often considered a monistic concept of God. In Chinese religion, Shangdi is conceived as the progenitor (first ancestor) of the universe, intrinsic to it and constantly bringing order to it. Other names for God include Baha in the Baháʼí Faith, Waheguru in Sikhism, Ahura Mazda in Zoroastrianism, and Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa in Balinese Hinduism.

    The most phenomenal art piece I have experienced in my life. God, in monotheistic thought, is conceived of as the supreme being, creator, and principal object of faith. God is usually conceived of as being omnipotent (all-powerful), omniscient (all-knowing), omnipresent (all-present) and omnibenevolent (all-good) as well as having an eternal and necessary existence. God is most often held to be incorporeal (immaterial). God's incorporeality or corporeality is related to conceptions of God's transcendence (being outside nature) or immanence (being in nature); Chinese theology exhibits a synthesis of both notions. Some religions describe God without reference to gender, while others use terminology that is gender-specific and gender-biased. God has been conceived as either personal or impersonal. In theism, God is the creator and sustainer of the universe, while in deism, God is the creator, but not the sustainer, of the universe. In pantheism, God is the universe itself. Atheism is an absence of belief in God, while agnosticism deems the existence of God unknown or unknowable. God has also been conceived as the source of all moral obligation, and the "greatest conceivable existent". Many notable philosophers have developed arguments for and against the existence of God. Monotheistic religions refer to their god using various names, some referring to cultural ideas about their god's identity and attributes. In ancient Egyptian Atenism, possibly the earliest recorded monotheistic religion, this deity was called Aten and proclaimed to be the one "true" Supreme Being and creator of the universe. In the Hebrew Bible and Judaism, the names of God include Elohim, Adonai, YHWH (Hebrew: יהוה‎) and others. Yahweh and Jehovah, possible vocalizations of YHWH, are used in Christianity. In the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, one God coexists in three "persons" called the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. In Islam, the name Allah is used, while Muslims also use a multitude of titles for God. In Hinduism, Brahman is often considered a monistic concept of God. In Chinese religion, Shangdi is conceived as the progenitor (first ancestor) of the universe, intrinsic to it and constantly bringing order to it. Other names for God include Baha in the Baháʼí Faith, Waheguru in Sikhism, Ahura Mazda in Zoroastrianism, and Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa in Balinese Hinduism.

  • Feb 06, 2021

    What were they even thinking? Astonishingly bad, and not even in a humorous way either. After watching and, all in all, enjoying the main films from the 'Star Wars' franchise, I thought I'd check out the many spin-off films. 'The Star Wars Holiday Special' makes for quite the start! I had heard bits and pieces about this down the years and those bits and pieces were usually pretty derogatory and now I can see why; it's far worse than I was anticipating though. The worst thing is that it doesn't even try to be silly and stupid, if actually attempts to be sincere and meaningful. It's utterly dire, from start to finish. No idea how they roped Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher into this, you gotta especially feel for Fisher given that end scene... wow. I wish it was 'so bad it's good' so it could've been ironically fun to watch, but it's the furthest thing from that.

    What were they even thinking? Astonishingly bad, and not even in a humorous way either. After watching and, all in all, enjoying the main films from the 'Star Wars' franchise, I thought I'd check out the many spin-off films. 'The Star Wars Holiday Special' makes for quite the start! I had heard bits and pieces about this down the years and those bits and pieces were usually pretty derogatory and now I can see why; it's far worse than I was anticipating though. The worst thing is that it doesn't even try to be silly and stupid, if actually attempts to be sincere and meaningful. It's utterly dire, from start to finish. No idea how they roped Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher into this, you gotta especially feel for Fisher given that end scene... wow. I wish it was 'so bad it's good' so it could've been ironically fun to watch, but it's the furthest thing from that.

  • Feb 02, 2021

    In an effort to keep reinvigorating the interest in Star Wars, a TV special was made and circulated a year after the release of Star Wars: A New Hope (1977). This was outside of George Lucas' artistic control, however, it featured not only the original cast, but also a plethora of guest stars – how could it fail? Pretty definitively in this case. ‘Happy Life Day'; God help me! This is the creation that the majority of the Star Wars cast and crew are reputed to have wished gone and buried. The production was largely a jaw-droppingly weird effort to string together a sort-of-plot involving the lovable and tough Wookie Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew) and rebellious pilot Han Solo (Harrison Ford). It centres on their attempts to get back to Chewie's family in time for Life Day: an event whose pertinence no-one even bothers to explain within the story, but from what I can gather, brings all Wookie-kind together in some hairy festive celebration. Ironically, this family were never mentioned in the previous film – even when Han Solo woodenly tries to explain that they are ‘like his family too.' The majority of this special unfolds on Chewie's family's arboreal homestead occupied by his wife Mala, grandfather Itchy, and son Lumpy. The genius executives that greenlighted this special, failed to include subtitles for when the human characters aren't there to conveniently re-interpret Wookie-speak, so viewers are left frequently and bafflingly as mere bemused witnesses of uninterpretable Wookie discourse and debate – we're off to a good start. This furry domestic set-up appears to be reflective of the US's favourite and familiar family-based sitcom scenario so beloved of this era. However, this is clashingly contrastive of the landscape of Star Wars – a common theme throughout this whole special. While they sit and wait for Chewie and Han, the story cuts away several times to a series of nonsensical, irritating and unintentionally hilarious scenarios involving the contemporary popular guest stars; Art Carney, Harvey Korman, Diahann Carroll, Bea Arthur; who, to be honest, were all looking like they would rather be just about anywhere else. One particularly bemusing segue involves Mala and the family under threat from the empire, but in between, a cooking show involving Harvey Korman as a sub-Julia Child-esque alien monstrosity is inserted; baking a Tatooine creature from a galactic recipe. In a further tangential mishap, grandpa Itchy is given a machine by Art Carney's trader character which simulates a sexual fantasy involving Diahann Carrol and LSD-infused visuals, I'm not joking, I only wish I were. Periodically, the original cast shows up to earn what their Star Wars related paycheque requires of them, which is mostly very little. By the time Han and Chewie finally show up, you find yourself simply not caring anymore and just flabbergasted by the display of absolute drug-fuelled compilation of inane subplots that really dares any Star Wars fan to reconsider the prequel's many shortcomings. The finale presents ‘Wookie's Life Day' with Carrie Fisher's Princess Leia, singing about its importance, while Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill (looking like a permed-up Ken doll) and of course, R2D2 and C3PO looking at all of this with what feels to be an utter shame – at least as much as R2 and C3PO can express that non-verbally. A complete waste of celluloid: it is a TV special with misplaced ambition and is bogged down by a script that conjures up horrific television clichés within a Star Wars context. The main cast looks embarrassed and horrified by what they presumably drunkenly signed up for. The guest stars are not funny and only appear to mug at the camera for all they're worth. Whatever loose structure the production had is ruined by continually stopping to make way for sketches that not even Spitting Image would dare to use, and actually only exists because of misguided executives wanting to put on their own variety show for devoted Star Wars fans and failing miserably. Yet, for how insane this special is, it scores well among the ‘most notable best-worst productions' of all time. It has to be seen to be believed.

    In an effort to keep reinvigorating the interest in Star Wars, a TV special was made and circulated a year after the release of Star Wars: A New Hope (1977). This was outside of George Lucas' artistic control, however, it featured not only the original cast, but also a plethora of guest stars – how could it fail? Pretty definitively in this case. ‘Happy Life Day'; God help me! This is the creation that the majority of the Star Wars cast and crew are reputed to have wished gone and buried. The production was largely a jaw-droppingly weird effort to string together a sort-of-plot involving the lovable and tough Wookie Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew) and rebellious pilot Han Solo (Harrison Ford). It centres on their attempts to get back to Chewie's family in time for Life Day: an event whose pertinence no-one even bothers to explain within the story, but from what I can gather, brings all Wookie-kind together in some hairy festive celebration. Ironically, this family were never mentioned in the previous film – even when Han Solo woodenly tries to explain that they are ‘like his family too.' The majority of this special unfolds on Chewie's family's arboreal homestead occupied by his wife Mala, grandfather Itchy, and son Lumpy. The genius executives that greenlighted this special, failed to include subtitles for when the human characters aren't there to conveniently re-interpret Wookie-speak, so viewers are left frequently and bafflingly as mere bemused witnesses of uninterpretable Wookie discourse and debate – we're off to a good start. This furry domestic set-up appears to be reflective of the US's favourite and familiar family-based sitcom scenario so beloved of this era. However, this is clashingly contrastive of the landscape of Star Wars – a common theme throughout this whole special. While they sit and wait for Chewie and Han, the story cuts away several times to a series of nonsensical, irritating and unintentionally hilarious scenarios involving the contemporary popular guest stars; Art Carney, Harvey Korman, Diahann Carroll, Bea Arthur; who, to be honest, were all looking like they would rather be just about anywhere else. One particularly bemusing segue involves Mala and the family under threat from the empire, but in between, a cooking show involving Harvey Korman as a sub-Julia Child-esque alien monstrosity is inserted; baking a Tatooine creature from a galactic recipe. In a further tangential mishap, grandpa Itchy is given a machine by Art Carney's trader character which simulates a sexual fantasy involving Diahann Carrol and LSD-infused visuals, I'm not joking, I only wish I were. Periodically, the original cast shows up to earn what their Star Wars related paycheque requires of them, which is mostly very little. By the time Han and Chewie finally show up, you find yourself simply not caring anymore and just flabbergasted by the display of absolute drug-fuelled compilation of inane subplots that really dares any Star Wars fan to reconsider the prequel's many shortcomings. The finale presents ‘Wookie's Life Day' with Carrie Fisher's Princess Leia, singing about its importance, while Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill (looking like a permed-up Ken doll) and of course, R2D2 and C3PO looking at all of this with what feels to be an utter shame – at least as much as R2 and C3PO can express that non-verbally. A complete waste of celluloid: it is a TV special with misplaced ambition and is bogged down by a script that conjures up horrific television clichés within a Star Wars context. The main cast looks embarrassed and horrified by what they presumably drunkenly signed up for. The guest stars are not funny and only appear to mug at the camera for all they're worth. Whatever loose structure the production had is ruined by continually stopping to make way for sketches that not even Spitting Image would dare to use, and actually only exists because of misguided executives wanting to put on their own variety show for devoted Star Wars fans and failing miserably. Yet, for how insane this special is, it scores well among the ‘most notable best-worst productions' of all time. It has to be seen to be believed.

  • Jan 21, 2021

    By the Force how was this ever made? I had heard about this show and seem to recall the announcements it was going to be aired. I had a job that required a lot of overtime and missed it until now. I had completely forgotten about this show until I came across some recent reviews bashing it. The reviews showed some of the bad scenes that didn't seem to bad as shown. I would not say that they were good, but they certainly were not bad. It actually piqued my interest especially when they criticized the stars for such bad acting. It was stated that the show had Chewbacca's family in it which I thought was a great idea. We would finally see a calmer family setting verses he loud roars denoting stress or excitement of the moment. It would be great to see how the imaginary language would translate in a calmer setting. The scenes shown were not bad at all. How could these actors be in such an awful show? I could not believe the people who criticized it. So, I made the fateful decision to look up the full show which let to great suffering on my part. First, I do not think that the acting is bad. It appears to me that they all did their best and Mark Hamill did better than anyone of them in trying to bring life to his part. It had a great cast put into a script that was beyond awful. Sure enough the bulk of the show is with Chewbacca's family, but there's no calm anywhere to be found. It seems they decided that agitated roar was their normal speech pattern. All of the wookiee's used poorly scripted mime to express what was going on. In the Star Wars movies, it is understood that Chewies wild roars are not casual speech. He does it when agitated and the show had decided that was their casual conversational tone. It is quite boring and one would fall asleep if not for the roars. The storyline is filled in with song and dance celebrating life day. Why would a holiday special be aired as life day just before Thanksgiving? For this great and wonderful holiday no one in the show seems all to thrilled about it which ups the notch of weirdness and does not fit in well with the main plot, although it should. The main plot is lost due to the cut scenes to the guest appearances. Now for the guests. The sexual innuendo is strong in this one (show) and odd. Jefferson Starship sung with a pink phallic symbol. Diane Carrol, was to arouse itchy through some VR attachment. Why? How was this in any way appropriate for Thanksgiving and Christmas that was coming up? It was very painful to watch. I highly advise that you avoid this show at all costs. I know many of you will be curious and watch it anyway. Remember, I warned you to stay away.

    By the Force how was this ever made? I had heard about this show and seem to recall the announcements it was going to be aired. I had a job that required a lot of overtime and missed it until now. I had completely forgotten about this show until I came across some recent reviews bashing it. The reviews showed some of the bad scenes that didn't seem to bad as shown. I would not say that they were good, but they certainly were not bad. It actually piqued my interest especially when they criticized the stars for such bad acting. It was stated that the show had Chewbacca's family in it which I thought was a great idea. We would finally see a calmer family setting verses he loud roars denoting stress or excitement of the moment. It would be great to see how the imaginary language would translate in a calmer setting. The scenes shown were not bad at all. How could these actors be in such an awful show? I could not believe the people who criticized it. So, I made the fateful decision to look up the full show which let to great suffering on my part. First, I do not think that the acting is bad. It appears to me that they all did their best and Mark Hamill did better than anyone of them in trying to bring life to his part. It had a great cast put into a script that was beyond awful. Sure enough the bulk of the show is with Chewbacca's family, but there's no calm anywhere to be found. It seems they decided that agitated roar was their normal speech pattern. All of the wookiee's used poorly scripted mime to express what was going on. In the Star Wars movies, it is understood that Chewies wild roars are not casual speech. He does it when agitated and the show had decided that was their casual conversational tone. It is quite boring and one would fall asleep if not for the roars. The storyline is filled in with song and dance celebrating life day. Why would a holiday special be aired as life day just before Thanksgiving? For this great and wonderful holiday no one in the show seems all to thrilled about it which ups the notch of weirdness and does not fit in well with the main plot, although it should. The main plot is lost due to the cut scenes to the guest appearances. Now for the guests. The sexual innuendo is strong in this one (show) and odd. Jefferson Starship sung with a pink phallic symbol. Diane Carrol, was to arouse itchy through some VR attachment. Why? How was this in any way appropriate for Thanksgiving and Christmas that was coming up? It was very painful to watch. I highly advise that you avoid this show at all costs. I know many of you will be curious and watch it anyway. Remember, I warned you to stay away.

  • Nov 27, 2020

    George Lucas didn't want to get rid of Jar Jar. He didn't want to get rid of Crystal Skull. He was forced to give up politics in A New Hope. He didn't even want to get rid of Howard the freaking Duck. But this, he wanted to get rid of this. And there is no surprise why.

    George Lucas didn't want to get rid of Jar Jar. He didn't want to get rid of Crystal Skull. He was forced to give up politics in A New Hope. He didn't even want to get rid of Howard the freaking Duck. But this, he wanted to get rid of this. And there is no surprise why.

  • Oct 01, 2020

    So terrible it's good

    So terrible it's good