Stranger Than Paradise Reviews

  • Oct 05, 2020

    Sooooo bad and boring. What level of “film major” do I need to be to be able to enjoy this.

    Sooooo bad and boring. What level of “film major” do I need to be to be able to enjoy this.

  • Jun 15, 2020

    A boring plot on paper but I really enjoyed it!

    A boring plot on paper but I really enjoyed it!

  • Apr 13, 2020

    Like a slow Kerouac tale. The images are beautiful. I love how it will go to black between scenes like you are looking through a road trip slide show.

    Like a slow Kerouac tale. The images are beautiful. I love how it will go to black between scenes like you are looking through a road trip slide show.

  • Nov 19, 2019

    Vibe with some friends while nothing happens. Jim Jarmusch's absurdist comedy Stranger Than Paradise (1984) is all about the mundane day to day existence of the average American. His writing pokes fun at T.V. dinners, football games, vacations, gambling, and driving. It's a completely normal naturalistic film wherein everyone acts totally unextraordinary. This leads to laughter and chuckles as each scene is like a short vignette in the form of a day in the life perspective. While the pacing is slow, you are just supposed to sit there with these characters and experience their lives making Stranger Than Paradise a charming comedy slow burn about nothing. Either you will love or hate Jarmusch's blunt manner of dialogue and storytelling. That's all there is to it. Jim Jarmusch's direction is a fantastic idea in putting his quirky characters into common situations in order to his politicians. The black and white cinematography is strikingly beautiful and haunting in how sparse and desolate America looks. The backdrop of New York, Ohio, and Florida gives Stranger Than Paradise an eerie tone. This is Americana at its most bleak and honest. Every shot is a wide shot that feels like you are in the room with these odd people. The lighting is beautifully dark and dim with a powerful viewpoint into the mindset of Americans. John Lurie's jazz score is an alluring disquieting symphony of ambient sounds. The main melody is lovely with a repeating phrase of violins and cello. Lurie's acting is also gripping as a mean Hungarian New Yorker named Willie just getting by cheating at gambling. His stoic and stern persona is fascinating to watch act. On the other hand, Richard Edson is likable and fun as the amiable friend to Willie named Eddy. Lastly, my favorite performance in Stranger Than Paradise is Eszter Balint as the Hungarian immigrant coming to America called Eva. She is funny, sweet, forlorn, angry, curious, playful, charming, bored, interested, and intriguing in every frame of Stranger Than Paradise. In all, Stranger Than Paradise is a fascinating film to rise to stardom with for Jim Jarmusch. He immediately establishes himself as a thoughtful auteur with a unique vision as director all his own.

    Vibe with some friends while nothing happens. Jim Jarmusch's absurdist comedy Stranger Than Paradise (1984) is all about the mundane day to day existence of the average American. His writing pokes fun at T.V. dinners, football games, vacations, gambling, and driving. It's a completely normal naturalistic film wherein everyone acts totally unextraordinary. This leads to laughter and chuckles as each scene is like a short vignette in the form of a day in the life perspective. While the pacing is slow, you are just supposed to sit there with these characters and experience their lives making Stranger Than Paradise a charming comedy slow burn about nothing. Either you will love or hate Jarmusch's blunt manner of dialogue and storytelling. That's all there is to it. Jim Jarmusch's direction is a fantastic idea in putting his quirky characters into common situations in order to his politicians. The black and white cinematography is strikingly beautiful and haunting in how sparse and desolate America looks. The backdrop of New York, Ohio, and Florida gives Stranger Than Paradise an eerie tone. This is Americana at its most bleak and honest. Every shot is a wide shot that feels like you are in the room with these odd people. The lighting is beautifully dark and dim with a powerful viewpoint into the mindset of Americans. John Lurie's jazz score is an alluring disquieting symphony of ambient sounds. The main melody is lovely with a repeating phrase of violins and cello. Lurie's acting is also gripping as a mean Hungarian New Yorker named Willie just getting by cheating at gambling. His stoic and stern persona is fascinating to watch act. On the other hand, Richard Edson is likable and fun as the amiable friend to Willie named Eddy. Lastly, my favorite performance in Stranger Than Paradise is Eszter Balint as the Hungarian immigrant coming to America called Eva. She is funny, sweet, forlorn, angry, curious, playful, charming, bored, interested, and intriguing in every frame of Stranger Than Paradise. In all, Stranger Than Paradise is a fascinating film to rise to stardom with for Jim Jarmusch. He immediately establishes himself as a thoughtful auteur with a unique vision as director all his own.

  • Jul 17, 2019

    Charming indi movie, with some funny moments and cute scenes, but it lacks the energy present in "Down by Law", and for me it's very difficult not to compare, for obvious reasons, the 2 works.

    Charming indi movie, with some funny moments and cute scenes, but it lacks the energy present in "Down by Law", and for me it's very difficult not to compare, for obvious reasons, the 2 works.

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best, GREATEST comedy movie ever made!

    The best, GREATEST comedy movie ever made!

  • Jan 20, 2019

    Arthouse crap. Nothing happens. Don't waste your time

    Arthouse crap. Nothing happens. Don't waste your time

  • Oct 26, 2018

    I think if the world was populated with people that act like the characters in Jim Jarmusch films we’d all die of boredom. It mystifies me how little these characters talk for 90 minutes. There are a few select scenes in Stranger Than Paradise where there is a lot of conversation going on, but most of the time we are treated to short question-and-answer conversations or silence. Except it’s not total silence. For some reason Jarmusch decides to film with the worst audio-video equipment available. There is constant buzzing in the audio from lights or cameras, and every sound is amplified like it was happening in a steel box. The dialogue is sometimes hard to hear (when there is dialogue,) because no one is properly wired for sound. The film also looks grainy, because he’s trying to invoke the visual style of movies from other eras (and other countries) even though this one was made in the 1980s and there are better options available. But when you’re making a movie where very little happens you have to do something out of the ordinary in the production to make it appear like this is a work of art and not a cure for insomnia. The plot of this movie, if you can call it that, is about a guy who reluctantly gives his cousin a place to stay for a brief time. Then he and his friend grow attached to her, and the three of them go on the most boring road trip imaginable. There’s some gambling that causes ups and downs in the fortunes of our characters, but that’s handled almost entirely off-camera because they can’t risk showing things that are interesting. There were occasional moments when I thought there was a chance we might see some excitement or adventure, but it all fizzles out in no time. I even started searching for themes and symbols, despite the fact that I typically ignore that stuff, but Stranger Than Paradise wore me down with its tedious pace and monotone flatness, so I could not make myself care. The cast is small, and the two main stars (John Lurie and Eszter Balint) appear to be instructed to act bored in every single scene. I can’t remember the last time I was less interested in two characters than Willie and Eva. There was no subject that they failed to make bland. Richard Edson is the third member of the team, and he seemed to be fighting to actually inject some emotion into the film. Every line he delivered sounded like it came from a different movie and was dropped in here to wake up the other two. I kept hoping he’d escape and head into a movie where there was someone else with emotion. After only watching two of his films, I’m starting to wonder if Jim Jarmusch somehow knows me and is specifically designing movies I will hate. Stranger Than Paradise is critically-acclaimed, so clearly there’s something in it that other people connect with, but I’d rather stare at a static modern art instillation for 90 minutes than watch something like this.

    I think if the world was populated with people that act like the characters in Jim Jarmusch films we’d all die of boredom. It mystifies me how little these characters talk for 90 minutes. There are a few select scenes in Stranger Than Paradise where there is a lot of conversation going on, but most of the time we are treated to short question-and-answer conversations or silence. Except it’s not total silence. For some reason Jarmusch decides to film with the worst audio-video equipment available. There is constant buzzing in the audio from lights or cameras, and every sound is amplified like it was happening in a steel box. The dialogue is sometimes hard to hear (when there is dialogue,) because no one is properly wired for sound. The film also looks grainy, because he’s trying to invoke the visual style of movies from other eras (and other countries) even though this one was made in the 1980s and there are better options available. But when you’re making a movie where very little happens you have to do something out of the ordinary in the production to make it appear like this is a work of art and not a cure for insomnia. The plot of this movie, if you can call it that, is about a guy who reluctantly gives his cousin a place to stay for a brief time. Then he and his friend grow attached to her, and the three of them go on the most boring road trip imaginable. There’s some gambling that causes ups and downs in the fortunes of our characters, but that’s handled almost entirely off-camera because they can’t risk showing things that are interesting. There were occasional moments when I thought there was a chance we might see some excitement or adventure, but it all fizzles out in no time. I even started searching for themes and symbols, despite the fact that I typically ignore that stuff, but Stranger Than Paradise wore me down with its tedious pace and monotone flatness, so I could not make myself care. The cast is small, and the two main stars (John Lurie and Eszter Balint) appear to be instructed to act bored in every single scene. I can’t remember the last time I was less interested in two characters than Willie and Eva. There was no subject that they failed to make bland. Richard Edson is the third member of the team, and he seemed to be fighting to actually inject some emotion into the film. Every line he delivered sounded like it came from a different movie and was dropped in here to wake up the other two. I kept hoping he’d escape and head into a movie where there was someone else with emotion. After only watching two of his films, I’m starting to wonder if Jim Jarmusch somehow knows me and is specifically designing movies I will hate. Stranger Than Paradise is critically-acclaimed, so clearly there’s something in it that other people connect with, but I’d rather stare at a static modern art instillation for 90 minutes than watch something like this.

  • Jun 23, 2018

    Relies too much on its 'arthouse' rights to excuse its being absolutely unbearable. But its not that easy, you dont get over with an awful film by calling it "art".

    Relies too much on its 'arthouse' rights to excuse its being absolutely unbearable. But its not that easy, you dont get over with an awful film by calling it "art".

  • Apr 24, 2017

    This is one of those movies that sticks with you even after seeing it and a couple years have passed.

    This is one of those movies that sticks with you even after seeing it and a couple years have passed.