Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
96% Judas and the Black Messiah (2021) Despite impressive performances, "Judas and the Black Messiah" has very little to say. - National Catholic Reporter EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2021
57% Malcolm & Marie (2020) With its terrific performances, resonating dialogue, and elegant single-setting production, the film compels us to see beyond a couple clamoring across the house and acknowledge that a perpetually underestimated woman has found her voice. - Elle EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2021
98% Summer of Soul (...Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised) (2021) As his longtime fans would probably attest, Thompson's music nerdom and sheer enthusiasm for the story of Black music practically leaps off the screen in Summer of Soul. - The Grio EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2021
85% Passing (2021) It all leads to a shocking and devastating conclusion but with gentle compassion, Hall captures the isolation, admiration, and quiet desperation between the women in a sophisticated story that still resonates nearly a century after it was first told. - The Grio EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2021
61% First Date (2021) Silly, empty, and entirely perplexing, First Date never really hits it off with its audience. - The Grio EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2021
88% Ailey (2021) As a result, it feels immediately hollow. Who is this nebulous voice, more seen than heard, that bears the film's name? - The Grio EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2021
52% R#J (2021) Intellectual audiences might assume in the beginning that the two are simply boning up on their British literature or practicing for a recital. Nope, buckle up, this is the entire ride. - The Grio EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2021
78% Audrey (2020) Hepburn confronted challenges both in front of and away from the camera, and Audrey shows she's an icon not because she's the archetype of what every woman should be. - Elle EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2021
90% Promising Young Woman (2020) Promising Young Woman is more profoundly a devastating reflection of a woman consumed with grief. - Elle EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 14, 2021
75% Pieces of a Woman (2020) Pieces of a Woman is a rather blunted depiction of an endlessly complex subject that deserves much more contemplation. Despite impressive performances, it fails to truly hit that mark. - Elle EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 14, 2021
93% Sylvie's Love (2020) Sylvie's humanity is never marginalized. We feel her joy, her pitfalls, and most importantly her love. We see the same for Robert as well. - Insider EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 14, 2021
93% Becoming (2020) "Becoming" is not trying to court controversy. Similar to her book, it aims to inspire young female supporters with the philosophy that "your story is your power." - NBC News THINK EDIT
Read More | Posted May 7, 2020
93% Blue Story (2020) Blue Story doesn't reinvent the wheel when it comes to films about turf wars, but its personal, humanizing themes about friendship, love, youth, and black masculinity keeps you riveted, Onwubolu's lyrical respites aside. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
88% Deerskin (2020) Despite playing an odd, mad villain, Dujardin (best known for his Oscar-winning performance in "The Artist") remains dangerously charming. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted May 1, 2020
43% The Roads Not Taken (2020) At once a baffling experience and a remarkably delicate one. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 12, 2020
93% Premature (2020) Premature is the kind of confident, remarkably vulnerable drama to which even veteran storytellers aspire. - Elle EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2020
87% Swallow (2020) There are really two contending films inside Swallow that, if given the opportunity and the space to do so, could have been fascinating as separate entities. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 3, 2020
64% All the Bright Places (2020) Smith and Fanning bring thoughtful performances to this delicate tale. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2020
100% Lost in America (2020) Sometimes its prosaic filmmaking does it no favors, but the film's ability to move the conversation forward merits attention. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
95% Come As You Are (2020) From its safe casting to the optics of Scotty's apparent white-male aggression among characters of color, Wong seems to be urging the audience to overlook its more tone-deaf messages for the sake of disability visibility-which it only halfway celebrates. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2020
74% The Photograph (2020) Impressively explores the intricacies of old-school and modern romance in a love story that also highlights the binding ties between a distant mother and her daughter. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2020
99% On the Record (2020) Brilliantly crystallizes how black women like Dixon, allies of black men and lovers of hip-hop, can so easily be taken advantage of by the same people they passionately want to celebrate. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2020
98% The Forty-Year-Old Version (2020) Despite Radha being embedded in an industry of make-believe, Blank needed to make the story seem real. And she does. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2020
92% The Assistant (2020) While the filmmaker rightly understands that shock value isn't the only way to tell a visceral story, its central performance by Julia Garner is what makes the film most interesting to watch. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 24, 2020
59% The Last Full Measure (2020) A poignant reevaluation of gallantry and of how survivor's guilt impacts those veterans whose lives were spared. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2020
16% Tyler Perry's A Fall from Grace (2020) Ultimately, nothing is much of a surprise in a story that fails to untether itself from Perry's longest lasting trope: the sad black woman. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 17, 2020
21% Like a Boss (2020) A mostly forgettable romp that throws together recycled themes of female entrepreneurship, friendship, and rivalry without making any real impact. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2020
91% Clemency (2019) While a woman like Bernadine would be reticent about expressing her presumed moral impasse due to the fact that she's a woman in a very masculine industry, Chukwu's rather aloof screenplay doesn't really allow her to grapple with any of that. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2019
83% Queen & Slim (2019) Queen & Slim excels as a poetic romance between two virtual strangers. - Film Comment Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2019
53% 21 Bridges (2019) Struggles to allow the cops to have some perspective in a forgettable thriller that is somehow both bloated and empty at the same time. (It's baffling how this is not a January or February release.) - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 18, 2019
84% Waves (2019) Provocatively examines black masculinity and the burden of living up to a societal standard, as well as a parental one. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2019
92% Ford v Ferrari (2019) With a staggering two-and-a-half-hour runtime, you'd think director James Mangold would have delved more deeply into the interior lives of its two protagonists in order to ground their narrative in something other than adrenaline and testosterone. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2019
64% Motherless Brooklyn (2019) The precise attention given to the style of Motherless Brooklyn serves only to underscore the plot's mediocre execution. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
92% Burning Cane (2019) Outside Tillman's homily, made magnificent and effectively hypocritical through Pierce's gripping performance, the discourse falls flat and strangely trivial at times given the context. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2019
91% #Female Pleasure (2019) An empowering statement for women, no matter their cultural or religious background, to reclaim their bodies and celebrate their sexuality without shame or suffering. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 16, 2019
97% Tell Me Who I Am (2019) Drawing from a startling real life story, director Ed Perkins plants audiences inside a film where mounting mystery climaxes to unsettling concern as we watch an amnesiac grapple with the horrifying reality that is his life. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 16, 2019
66% Mister America (2019) Underscores recognizable themes no less irritating in mockumentary form than they are in real life: white supremacy, miscarriages of justice, and racial disenfranchisement. But the film needs to say something about it rather than merely hold up a mirror. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 7, 2019
21% Lucy in the Sky (2019) Though Portman impressively commits, the performance is ultimately empty, because Lucy's distress is explained only in vague conversations with Mark that further reduce her feelings, everything from love to anger, as "not real." - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
65% Sister Aimee (2019) The gendered themes at play here do little to boost the quality of Buck and Schlingmann's storytelling, which is too tangled to follow at times. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2019
52% Black and Blue (2019) For a film that suggests even in its title that it reflects a necessary and under-discussed conversation, it falters quite tremendously. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2019
91% Don't Be Nice (2019) Captures the revitalization of the artist in a world filled with doom. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2019
83% Ad Astra (2019) [Brad Pitt] blurs the line between fear and precision so easily that it's a haunting experience. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 3, 2019
87% What You Gonna Do When the World's on Fire? (2019) It's the most unproductive type of sociopolitical film, especially in today's climate, in that it aims to incite but not to motivate. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 15, 2019
88% This Changes Everything (2019) It's not up to one documentary to address everything at once, but if we're talking about community-building, that means we all have to be invited to the conversation or at least mentioned in it. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
63% Brian Banks (2019) Not only are the women in the film completely underwritten (with Kennisha's depiction particularly woeful), but Shadyac and Atchison also don't really do any favors for their eponymous hero either. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 6, 2019
67% Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw (2019) Definitely about as ridiculous as a movie can be, for better or worse. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2019
85% Once Upon a Time In Hollywood (2019) Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood is at once a wickedly entertaining, nostalgic, tragic, yet timely look at a town consumed with narcissism and, ironically, its own mortality. - Shondaland EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 30, 2019
75% Armstrong (2019) There are several points throughout "Armstrong" that feel sluggish... but it does manage to soar (please forgive the pun) once it actually brings the audience to the moon with Armstrong, Aldrin, and command module pilot Michael Collins. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2019
83% Midsommar (2019) While his previous feature offered an unwavering look at the splintering of one family, Midsommar compartmentalizes Dani's grief (and refuses even to bother explaining the murders) as it pivots away from it both tonally and narratively. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2019
97% Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (2019) A portrait of a writer who has always dared to reflect the world as she sees it: as ugly as it is beautiful, where black characters have the agency to be as bold, hurtful, and triumphant as everyone else. - TheWrap EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 17, 2019