Jake Wilson Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Jake Wilson

Jake Wilson
Jake Wilson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Urban Cinefile, Sydney Morning Herald, The Age (Australia)

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/5 34% I Feel Pretty (2018) I Feel Pretty is plainly a message movie, but part of the fun is that we're given multiple messages to choose from. ‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Apr 19, 2018
1.5/5 No Score Yet The Song Keepers (2017) It seems cruel to criticise a film that so plainly wants to be loved, but Naina Sen's The Song Keepers is one of the weakest Australian documentaries to score a big-screen release in a while.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2018
2/5 14% Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (2018) The tameness of Truth or Dare illustrates how far mainstream horror has lost its disreputable edge.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2018
2.5/5 90% Isle of Dogs (2018) This is outwardly one of Anderson's bleakest films. It's also one of his dullest and least emotional.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2018
2/5 82% Blockers (2018) In short, it appears that what Hollywood has to say on this subject remains as moralistic yet confused as ever. Someone should try making a comedy about that.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
3/5 73% Ready Player One (2018) In some sense, this is the ultimate development of the fast, smooth, virtuosic style Spielberg has honed over the decades, which borrows heavily from advertising and depends on our instant recognition of fleeting visual cues.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
2/5 20% Sherlock Gnomes (2018) If you're scratching around for something you can bear to sit through with your kids, this is ― to quote another British classic ― mostly harmless. Otherwise, it's one for the gnome buffs.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
2/5 62% Peter Rabbit (2018) More than anything, Gluck seems bored with the material, and worried that his audience will be too. Unfortunately, making the action more frenetic only adds to the sense of desperation. ‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
3/5 96% The Endless (2018) While The Endless in some ways feels like a dead end, it still leaves you hopeful for whatever uncanny visions they can dream up next.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2018
2.5/5 74% In the Fade (Aus dem Nichts) (2017) You could see this as leaving the ultimate verdict up to the audience. Or, more cynically, you could feel that his desire to make a big statement still exceeds anything in particular he wants to say.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Mar 14, 2018
2/5 49% Tomb Raider (2018) Vikander successfully conveys the toughness and focus you might expect in, say, a champion triathlete. But she struggles to endow Lara with iconic force, which is not altogether her fault, considering how little she has to work with.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Mar 14, 2018
3.5/5 47% Red Sparrow (2018) A ponderous and abstract yet fascinating spy thriller.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Mar 7, 2018
3.5/5 80% Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool (2017) McGuigan's role is essentially to serve the script and the performers, and we can be grateful the project wasn't handed to a director more bent on imposing an authorial stamp.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2018
2.5/5 69% Finding Your Feet (2018) ... is far from the worst of its kind, despite a mediocre script (by Meg Leonard and Nick Moorcroft) that goes for easy laughs and signals every plot development well in advance.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2018
2.5/5 32% Insidious: The Last Key (2018) While the Insidious series has given Shaye a rare moment in the spotlight, there's a sense in which Elise has been cursed by Hollywood's endless demand for sequels.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2018
3/5 67% Happy End (2017) Formally Happy End is a crafty piece of work, but as a social critic Haneke is less convincing than ever. ‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2018
3/5 94% Sweet Country (2018) Thornton's long-awaited second narrative feature has strengths of its own, but not the same immediate emotional force. ‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2018
3/5 92% The Shape of Water (2017) ... Del Toro's willingness to court absurdity and bad taste serves to guarantee his integrity, proving he hasn't entirely gone respectable.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2018
3/5 85% Mary and The Witch's Flower (2018) Compared with most so-called family entertainment, Mary and the Witch's Flower deserves to be ranked high.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2018
2.5/5 57% The Commuter (2018) As for Neeson, to call him a "reliable" actor is a polite way of saying he has few surprises left in him; his relentlessly even manner dampens down any possible excitement.‐ Sydney Morning Herald
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2018
2.5/5 29% Bleeding Steel (2017) In theory, this is some kind of tongue-in-cheek science fiction action caper, but Zhang proceeds as if his goal were to keep us in the dark for as long as possible as to what the story is about.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2018
3.5/5 97% Coco (2017) Every plot point and thematic implication slots into place, but the pleasures of Coco are above all visual. I don't think I've ever seen a computer-animated film so rich in detail, or so dedicated to recreating complex and beautiful lighting schemes.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Dec 29, 2017
4/5 65% Slack Bay (Ma loute) (2017) Slack Bay is not always funny, but it's truly unique and in the long run, more emotionally powerful than might be expected.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2017
4/5 96% The Florida Project (2017) Little Moonee is innocent in every sense that counts, and even her worst misdeeds are fuelled by excitement at the possibilities of life.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2017
3.5/5 91% Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) While The Last Jedi may not receive top marks for originality, the eighth official entry in the Star Wars saga is still one of the most entertaining blockbusters of the year...‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2017
3/5 50% The Fortress (2017) ... a film that will probably mean most to viewers from Korea, where it was made - though you don't need to know much about the historical background to gather roughly what the story is meant to suggest about the present.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2017
1.5/5 45% The Star (2017) This thin storyline is padded out with subplots that showcase a bizarrely star-studded voice cast.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
3/5 86% Better Watch Out (2017) While the film is more cartoonish than psychologically believable, it's willing to go to some genuinely uncomfortable places.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
3.5/5 19% Daddy's Home 2 (2017) Ferrell and Wahlberg make an odd kind of comic team, since they rarely seem to be acting on the same level: Ferrell can hardly bring himself to be sincere, while Wahlberg can hardly be anything but. Still, the combination works.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
3/5 40% Justice League (2017) It's teamwork that saves the day, with DC's trademark darkness giving way to a brand of sentimental uplift that Snyder, Whedon and company apparently see as necessary in our own dark times.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2017
2.5/5 82% Brad's Status (2017) Brad's self-pity is absurd, yet we're seemingly meant to sympathise as he mourns his lost promise; his voiceover ruminations about falling out of love with the world have the ring of Terrence Malick at his worst. ‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2017
3/5 47% My Little Pony: The Movie (2017) ... its sugary surface the film offers itself as a guide for little girls on how to navigate the world that lies before them, stressing the need for female solidarity above all.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2017
2.5/5 29% A Bad Moms Christmas (2017) Jon Lucas and Scott Moore, who jointly wrote and directed, are hacks whose sheer ruthlessness makes them effective to a degree.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Nov 1, 2017
2.5/5 28% Suburbicon (2017) Do we need to be told, yet again, that evil lurks beneath the picture-perfect surface of American suburbia?‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Oct 27, 2017
3/5 92% Thor: Ragnarok (2017) Taken on its own patchwork terms, Thor: Ragnarok is mostly diverting entertainment, though no match for what [Taika] Waititi can achieve on his own with a fraction of the budget.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2017
3/5 81% Brigsby Bear (2017) [Dave] McCary and his team have fun with the lo-fi aesthetics of the show within the film.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2017
2/5 No Score Yet Path Of Souls (2012) This is, in short, a blandly soothing film with little substance of any sort.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Oct 20, 2017
63% Here I Am (2010) If a picture is usually worth a thousand words, there is a shelf-full of history here.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2017
71% Carnage (2011) Without being obtrusive about it, [Roman] Polanski uses every cinematic trick at his command to increase tension: viewed through distorting wide-angle lenses, the characters appear to gain and lose stature from shot to shot.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2017
85% The Turning (2015) The Turning resembles an epic round of the surrealist game Exquisite Corpse, in which players separately draw parts of a human figure on a sheet of paper which is then unfolded to reveal the bizarre whole.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2017
No Score Yet Fallout (2013) Fallout offers a valuable new account of both book and film, placing both in the context of a historical moment when nuclear annihilation seemed a more than plausible threat.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2017
50% Half of a Yellow Sun (2014) [Biyi] Bandele seizes every opportunity to build atmosphere with heightened colours and streaked lighting patterns. It helps that the cinematographer John de Borman, shoots on 35-millimetre film rather than digitally, nowadays an increasingly rare choice.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2017
77% The Invisible Woman (2013) The strength of the film lies in the sense that [Ralph] Fiennes has set out to capitalise on these absences, using Tucker's prosaic, BBC-style screenplay as the basis for something more experimental and oblique.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2017
3/5 No Score Yet Consolation (2010) This imperfect but unusual film suggests understanding might finally be out of reach - to the point where it is hard to draw any certain moral.‐ Australian Book Review
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2017
2/5 40% The Mountain Between Us (2017) [The Mountain Between Us] is a flimsy romance posing as a survival story.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2017
2.5/5 No Score Yet Blue (2017) Does this kind of parade of horrors do any practical good, or is it merely a modern brand of exploitation cinema, letting us feel righteously indignant as well as thrillingly appalled?‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2017
3.5/5 52% The Belko Experiment (2017) Going about its grisly business with undisguised relish, the film comes closer to the chilly spirit of science fiction writer J.G. Ballard than director Ben Wheatley did in his recent, overwrought adaptation of Ballard's novel High-Rise.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2017
3/5 64% Fireworks, Should We See It from the Side or the Bottom? (2017) Even at its most solid, the world sketched here has an unreality which is appealing in itself: the wind turbines spin much more quietly than you'd expect, and the grass beneath them is mysteriously still.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Oct 6, 2017
3.5/5 87% Blade Runner 2049 (2017) Despite its blockbuster trappings, this Blade Runner is as much an art movie as the first one: slow, idea-driven, and often emotionally remote. ‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Oct 4, 2017
3/5 91% Heal the Living (RĂ©parer les vivants) (2017) [Heal the Living] explores the ever-vulnerable body, the social institution of medicine and how individuals stand in relation to each.‐ The Age (Australia)
Read More | Posted Sep 27, 2017