Jake Wilson

Jake Wilson
Jake Wilson's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Urban Cinefile Sydney Morning Herald The Age (Australia)

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
1.5/5 33% Music (2020) The equivalent to a pop-up bar furnished with hastily assembled knick-knacks from the 1990s, in desperate hope we might assume the randomness was somehow by design. Utterly consistent, however, is the commitment to cloying whimsy. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 13, 2021
3/5 49% Monster Hunter (2020) What does merit taking seriously is the screen presence of Jovovich -- an action icon easily up there with Keanu Reeves, in some respects her male equivalent. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 5, 2021
1.5/5 73% A Call to Spy (2020) Given the potential of the material, there's no excuse for the dullness of A Call To Spy, a film as clumsy as its title. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 28, 2020
3/5 60% Wonder Woman 1984 (2020) Gadot as Wonder Woman -- or Diana Prince, as she's more commonly known -- may be the single best piece of casting in a superhero role since Christopher Reeve first donned the cape and spandex of the Man of Steel. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 28, 2020
2.5/5 55% Dreamland (2020) The squared-off framing and lateral tracking shots suggest a study of modern film school favorites like Wes Anderson and Bong Joon-ho. While all this might be taken to signal a facetious distance from the material, irony and cynicism are curiously absent. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2020
88% THE GODFATHER, Coda: The Death of Michael Corleone (2020) This undeniably improves on the original version from 1990, always regarded as the weak point of the trilogy. The story is less cluttered by flashbacks and easier to follow, especially in the first half hour. - Sydney Morning Herald EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2020
2.5/5 49% The Witches (2020) Who could improve on the regal fury of Anjelica Huston?... Certainly not Anne Hathaway, whose performance in this remake, by comparison, has more than a tinge of the high school drama club. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2020
2.5/5 92% The Furnace (2020) MacKay is not lacking in talent, but for a first-time director he may have taken on a little too much. While the scattered quality of the storytelling may be partly deliberate, a bigger problem is the lack of consistent tone. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2020
3.5/5 100% Oliver Sacks: His Own Life (2020) Despite the relatively conventional filmmaking, what comes through most strongly in this portrait is Sacks' uniqueness -- a quality, as he said himself, which he shared with everyone else who has ever lived. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2020
2.5/5 83% Happiest Season (2020) Happiest Season sets itself the challenge of acknowledging pain and conflict while somehow finding its way to a unifying happy end. But the sentiment here never feels earned, especially as much of the writing is broad to the point of crudity. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2020
3/5 83% Mank (2020) Mank feels like a project undertaken for obscure personal reasons, which perhaps never had much chance of artistic success. At the least, though, it's an unusually ambitious and interesting failure. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2020
3.5/5 83% Freaky (2020) Newton is up to the task of embodying a relentless "murder Barbie," but most of the comedy is assigned to Vaughn, more enthusiastically committed here than in many of his recent roles. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 12, 2020
86% On The Rocks (2020) In her best film in close to a decade, Sofia Coppola tries at long last to imagine some version of adulthood, in the most equivocal possible way. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2020
83% The Brood (1979) One of the films that gave rise to the term "body horror," David Cronenberg's 1979 shocker is a characteristic mix of the sombre, the wacky and the viscerally grotesque. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2020
88% Pit and the Pendulum (The Pit and the Pendulum) (1961) Roger Corman is legendary as a B-movie producer, but his less-heralded gifts as a director are displayed in this 1961 entry in his series of fantasia on themes from Edgar Allan Poe, staged with an elegance that belies the low budget and lurid content. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2020
94% Passport to Pimlico (1949) A near-perfect expression of the lightly anarchistic ethos associated with Britain's Ealing studio, with a host of great character actors and a script by... TEB Clarke that stands as a model of how to develop an absurd situation step by step. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2020
93% Pauline At The Beach (1983) Flawlessly constructed as usual, this 1983 instalment in Eric Rohmer's Comedies and Proverbs series is one of his most sensual films - and one of his saddest. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2020
3.5/5 99% Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) In the refusal to spell out or resolve too much, something lingers. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 28, 2020
3/5 85% Borat: Subsequent Moviefilm (2020) In an era when suspicion is widespread we're all being pranked one way or another, there's an almost nostalgic appeal to a conman willing to come clean about his scams. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2020
2/5 40% Honest Thief (2020) Honest Thief is a small-scale, low-budget, minor-league affair. That wouldn't be a problem if cinematographer Shelly Johnson had the imagination to compensate for the lack of spectacle, but the story is as familiar as it is tame. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2020
2/5 40% Irresistible (2020) It's plain all along that Stewart has little interest in his characters and their troubles except as a means for him to score didactic points, primarily about the evils of unrestricted campaign financing. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2020
3/5 100% Miss Juneteenth (2020) It's a rare American film that is willing to risk not having the protagonist learn the right lesson -- especially if the filmmaker, too, is ambitious to move on to bigger things. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 7, 2020
2/5 90% The Trial of the Chicago 7 (2020) Aaron Sorkin's The Trial of the Chicago 7 may not be the squarest film ever made about 1960s radicalism... Still, this loose "true story" is exactly what you would expect from Sorkin. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 30, 2020
2.5/5 70% The High Note (2020) While Maggie eventually proves her competence as a producer, there's no attempt to suggest that her work is especially brilliant or groundbreaking. Nor could any claim remotely like that be made for The High Note. But all goes down easy. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2020
2.5/5 71% Trolls World Tour (2020) Even with so much spelled out, the significance of this very abstract parable will be best appreciated by the adults in the room, just as the trippy visuals (often quite imaginative) belong to the same tradition of knowingly warped storybook imagery. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 16, 2020
3/5 88% Adam (2019) Despite the familiarity of the premise, there is something instantly appealing about Adam -- and about Touzani's style, which is plain without being artless. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 9, 2020
72% Becky (2020) This is a film of gimmicks, most of them rather tired. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 9, 2020
2/5 62% Fatima (2020) The message of the Virgin, less consoling than apocalyptic, is visualized by Pontecorvo in sometimes lurid terms. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 2, 2020
81% I'm Thinking of Ending Things (2020) The whole thing, in short, is a nightmare -- one that may leave confirmed horror fans as bewildered as anyone else, since Kaufman seems bent on frustrating our expectations of the genre. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 28, 2020
100% Atlantis (2019) Sergiy's dead-eyed quality is mirrored in the film's style. Scenes typically play out in a single take, the camera set at a fixed distance and blankly awaiting catastrophe. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 20, 2020
95% Marona's Fantastic Tale (L'Extraordinaire voyage de Marona) (2020) It's all appealing to the eye, though it must be said that the high-flown approach erases most of the earthier facts of canine life. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2020
No Score Yet Kala azar (2020) Where a director like Yorgos Lanthimos (The Lobster) builds a parallel universe from scratch in each film, the oddest thing about Kala Azar is that nothing happens here that couldn't happen in the real world. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2020
100% Mayor (2020) Osit gets considerable comic value out of the intrinsic banality of local government. But once we start to see Hadid engaging with the wider world, the film becomes a tribute to his valiant effort to preserve some kind of dignity. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2020
100% Sunless Shadows (2020) No convicted murderers could look less fearsome than the demure subjects of this low-key but startling documentary from Iran's Mehrdad Oskouei. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 12, 2020
1.5/5 49% Made in Italy (2020) I can only hope this real-life bonding exercise was more satisfying than what appears on screen. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 12, 2020
No Score Yet The Leadership (2019) Even as it stands, this blend of travelogue, TED talk and traumatic encounter group session appeals to the imagination as a snapshot of how the world is changing in multiple directions at once. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2020
98% Vitalina Varela (2020) The enduring paradox of Costa's work is that this setting has its own irresistible glamour, reminiscent of fashion photography; the people he films are his models. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 6, 2020
100% This Is Not a Burial, It's a Resurrection (2020) Mosese knows the score, and if you want to see what today's model of cutting-edge cinema looks like, you could do far worse. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 6, 2020
4/5 87% Deerskin (2020) This is a willfully dumbed-down, emptied-out version of Hitchcock, as if the goal were to prove that the mechanisms of suspense still appeal to the lizard brain no matter how stupid the overt "content". - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 5, 2020
2/5 72% 23 Walks (2020) Playing into all the stereotypes of British reticence, the film moves at a crawling pace that makes David Lean's famously restrained Brief Encounter look like a monument to erotic excess. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2020
No Score Yet Paris Calligrammes (2019) Paris more than most cities is recognisably the same place it was 50 or 100 years ago... Ottinger brings this home for us, while tempering her nostalgia with an attention to aspects of history that deserve anything but celebration. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2020
90% State Funeral (2019) The cumulative effect is to encourage distrust of state-sponsored imagery in any form, and to suggest that, under the spell of the right official narrative, we too might be moved to authentic tears. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2020
94% Anne at 13,000 ft (2020) It is no easy thing to show a character like this without sentimentalizing or imposing clear-cut judgement. But Anne at 13,000 Feet succeeds: Campbell seems to grasp the character totally even when we don't. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2020
89% Hyènes (Hyenas) (1992) Mambety makes the source material his own, in vivid, witty images. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2020
3.5/5 49% Where'd You Go, Bernadette (2019) These themes have preoccupied Linklater through his whole career -- and while Where'd You Go, Bernadette may not be one of his peaks, it shows he's still bent on approaching them in new ways. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2020
3/5 74% The King of Staten Island (2020) If you're prepared to give Davidson a chance, Apatow's entertainment instincts and a well-chosen supporting cast are enough to ensure the film never becomes an outright drag. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2020
2/5 80% The Old Guard (2020) Despite a clearly substantial budget and starry cast, it feels closer to an overblown TV pilot than to spectacle on the Marvel scale. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2020
2/5 87% Shirley (2020) Decker and Gubbins zig just where you might expect them to zag - but for all their departures from fact, they're not bold enough to give the tale quite the kind of vicious twist Jackson herself could be counted on to deliver. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 8, 2020
3/5 No Score Yet The Taverna (2020) The Taverna is billed as a black comedy, and the increasingly over-the-top action does spark some laughs. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 2, 2020
3/5 90% The Booksellers (2020) In style it's conventional, but it bounces along, with the brisk editing and David Ullmann's jazzy score setting a fusty yet lively tone not far removed from the films of Woody Allen. - The Age (Australia) EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 1, 2020