Wendy Ide Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Wendy Ide

Wendy Ide
Wendy Ide's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
100% The Girl Without Hands (La Jeune fille sans mains) (2017) While the source material may have originally been aimed at younger audiences, Laudenbach's elegant execution has a sophistication which is more likely to recommend it to older ones.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2017
1/5 63% Tommy's Honour (2017) Ultimately this is stuffy, old man's cinema, narrow in scope and ambition and of little interest to anyone except golf movie completists.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2017
4/5 92% Abacus: Small Enough to Jail (2017) Disarmingly human moments - the Sung daughters, all high-powered lawyers, fret over their 80-year-old father's disappointing sandwich - pepper this compelling courtroom drama.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2017
2/5 43% Song to Song (2017) It all adds up to a beautiful nothing.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2017
2/5 35% The Last Word (2017) With its off-the-mark proclamations about the Kinks and hi-fi nerd jargon, this feels like a screenplay written by someone who once read about music on Wikipedia but prefers not to listen to it.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2017
3/5 92% Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) Part superhero movie, part high-school coming-of-age story, it's bouncy, likable and completely devoid of threat.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2017
4/5 47% The Human Surge (El auge del humano) (2017) Williams's bewildering, sinuous film encourages us to realise that getting lost is a destination in itself.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2017
3/5 50% A Change in the Weather (2017) A tendency towards navel-gazing improvised dialogue is balanced by evocative use of music and a poignant supernatural subplot.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2017
4/5 91% The Midwife (Sage femme) (2017) A low-key Dardennes-style realism is seasoned with just a touch of melodrama; two formidable actors attack their roles with the same gusto that Béatrice deploys when faced with a nice bottle of Graves.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2017
50% England Is Mine (2017) A suitably abrasive study of one of British pop's spikiest characters.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
No Score Yet That Good Night (2017) So effortlessly good is Hurt ... that he rather outclasses the rest of this somewhat workmanlike picture.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
No Score Yet My Pure Land (2017) A feminist perspective and a novel location add a new angle to a story which, in many ways, follows a classic Western format.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
No Score Yet The Last Photograph (2017) Although the story deals with emotionally wrenching themes, there is a coolness here which keeps us at arm's length.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
4/5 67% The Seasons in Quincy: Four Portraits of John Berger (2016) This is a film that celebrates the exchange of ideas, creating a microcosm for independent thought that is every bit as fertile as the fecund mountain farmlands where Berger made his home.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2017
1/5 23% The Book of Henry (2017) The plot combines child cancer death and pre-teen sexual abuse with such syrupy superficiality that it makes your teeth hurt.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2017
2/5 80% Souvenir (2016) Even the great Isabelle Huppert can have a misfire, it seems.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2017
4/5 100% Edith Walks (2017) The route is as the crow flies, but it's embellished with glorious curlicues of eccentricity.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2017
1/5 15% Transformers: The Last Knight (2017) Perhaps you need to be huffing petrol fumes (or whatever it is that the autobots run on) but 149 minutes have rarely felt so interminable.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2017
3/5 100% In This Corner of the World (Kono sekai no katasumi ni) (2017) Set in and near Hiroshima during the second world war, this gentle but slightly unfocused anime looks at Japan through the eyes of an 18-year-old girl.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2017
1/5 43% Hampstead (2017) This ghastly faux-mance pays lip service to the housing crisis but has as much genuine empathy as someone whose main concern about rising rents is whether it might push up the price of nannies.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2017
16% All Eyez on Me (2017) It is hard to really get a sense of the rapper as a character, so armoured is he by the crackling forcefield of anger which builds exponentially along with his success.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
3/5 76% Ballerina (2016) Nineteenth-century Paris is handsomely captured in pleasing sun-dappled computer-animation. And the message of fortitude and resilience is undercut with humour.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2017
2/5 15% The Mummy (2017) No amount of clunky expository dialogue can untangle this mess of bones, bandages and bald commercial cynicism.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2017
3/5 89% Norman (Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer) (2017) It's a light-footed shimmy of a performance from Gere, who connects us with an unexpected dignity in the soul of this professional parasite.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2017
2/5 32% From the Land of the Moon (Mal de pierres) (2017) The final twist ramps up the feverish silliness of a story that is already unintentionally daft.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2017
2/5 46% Wilson (2017) Despite the mordant humour and the full-throttle chaos of Harrelson's performance, we struggle to connect with any emotional truth here.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2017
4/5 76% Berlin Syndrome (2017) Shortland delves into the knotty complexity of the co-dependent relationship between captor and captive.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2017
1/5 21% The Shack (2017) Making a sincere film about religious faith is a tricky thing to pull off. And this folksy dose of misguided manipulation demonstrates many of the common pitfalls.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2017
3/5 100% Disturbing The Peace (2016) The film gives a hearing to people from both sides, unpicking their ingrained hatred and exploring the moment when they decided that enough was enough.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 4, 2017
2/5 92% The Shepherd (El pastor) (2016) Well-meaning but predictable ...‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 4, 2017
3/5 45% The Hippopotamus (2017) This adaptation of Stephen Fry's novel leans heavily on the elegant profanity of the source material.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 4, 2017
2/5 53% Dough (2016) Best filed alongside tandoori chicken pizza in the list of hybrid recipes that should never have left the kitchen ...‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 4, 2017
4/5 96% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) Hirokazu Koreeda's bittersweet comedy about three generations of a Japanese family is a gentle delight.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 4, 2017
4/5 92% Wonder Woman (2017) In common with Diana, there is a genuine wonder at work here. We rediscover the tropes of genre through her questioning eyes. And for once, the comic-book movie almost seems fresh again.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jun 4, 2017
49% Churchill (2017) Too ponderously paced and conventional to make much of an impact.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
42% In the Fade (Aus dem Nichts) (2017) Doggedly conventional in its approach, the film walks an uneasy line between unflinching honesty and crass emotional exploitation, before tipping into the latter in a questionable final act.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 26, 2017
No Score Yet Zombillenium (2017) Laugh-out-loud moments are about as common as heartbeats in this tale of the industrious undead.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 26, 2017
No Score Yet I Am Not a Witch (2017) The film crafts a framework of superstition and ritual, onto which is hung a vividly realised, if somewhat enigmatic portrait of a child's life.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 26, 2017
4/5 83% 12 Days (2017) It's a quietly devastating film.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted May 25, 2017
53% Radiance (Hikari) (2017) Fans of Kawase's small scale personal dramas will respond to the film's wistful tone, as well as the plaintive prettiness of the photography.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 23, 2017
4/5 89% The Workshop (L'atelier) (2017) It's a film which demonstrates that debate, the exchange of ideas, can be as thrilling as any ramped up action flick.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
75% Before We Vanish (Sanpo suru shinryakusha) (2017) The sparks of dark humour within this awkwardly paced and overlong drama are not enough to sustain audience interest until the film's laboured conclusion.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
100% A Man of Integrity (Lerd) (2017) A satisfyingly gritty addition to Iran's tradition of humanist cinema.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
3/5 20% Alive in France (2017) [A] shambling blues jam of a documentary.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
67% The Day After (Geu-hu) (2017) All but the most dedicated fans of the director's work might find this story a little too diffuse and meandering, its rewards too deeply buried beneath the evasive wordiness.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
No Score Yet Beauty and the Dogs (Aala Kaf Ifrit) (2017) It's not an easy watch. But, with its feminist spin on the continued battle for basic legal rights following the 2011 ousting of Tunisia's Ben Ali regime, it feels like an important one.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 19, 2017
No Score Yet Ava (2017) Stylistic impact notwithstanding, the film is unbalanced by aimless plotting and queasy questions about the sexualisation of a vulnerable child protagonist.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 19, 2017
73% Wonderstruck (2017) While some might question the key role that serendipity plays in this story, more will respond to the immaculate period work, the engaged approach to disability and the gradual swell of emotion which builds to a belter of a tear jerking climax.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
71% A Suitable Girl (2017) While this triptych portrait of three modern Indian women who have decided, for various reasons, to wed in this way provides some insights, it feels like a tiny chink into a vast and complex subject‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 17, 2017
95% Radio Dreams (2017) Radio Dreams' aimless pacing and the characters' fatalistic attitude to the events means that dramatic tension is lacking.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted May 17, 2017