Wendy Ide Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Wendy Ide

Wendy Ide
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Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Becoming Astrid (Unga Astrid) (2018) Using the fan letters of children as touchstones, the film tells a story which contains many of the same stirring qualities - resilience, triumph over adversity - which made Lindgren's fiction so enduringly popular.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2018
No Score Yet Sunday's Illness (La enfermedad del domingo) (2018) Both performances are phenomenally good; the two women who at first seem like opposites are gradually drawn together by something primal and unbreakable.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2018
No Score Yet The Silent Revolution (Das Schweigende Klassenzimmer) (2018) This is a solid, good-looking piece of filmmaking which is elevated by a clutch of strong performances from the young cast.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2018
60% Profile (2018) The film crackles with tension.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2018
No Score Yet 3 Days in Quiberon (3 Tage in Quiberon) (2018) Gwisdek is a tricky delight as the unscrupulous journalist who instinctively seeks out Romy's weakest points. But she disarms him too.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2018
22% 7 Days in Entebbe (Entebbe) (2018) Although much of the film is effectively claustrophobic, it is too bogged down by exposition to fully take off.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Real Estate (Toppen av ingenting) (2018) Tonally, it has elements of Ulrich Seidl at his cruellest and least forgiving, combined with a lurid B movie bombast.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2018
No Score Yet L'Animale (2018) Although hardly breaking new ground, the second feature from Katharina Mueckstein takes an unfussy, clear-eyed approach to gender and sexual politics.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2018
No Score Yet Virus Tropical (2017) Appealingly intricate animation is the main selling point of this coming-of-age story which captures, perhaps a little too authentically, the self absorption of adolescence.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Heiresses (Las Herederas) (2018) There is much to admire for those who chime with the languid rhythms and language of loaded sidelong glances.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2018
No Score Yet That Summer (2017) [A] sporadically intriguing, but ultimately unsatisfying film.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2018
3/5 100% Pad Man (2018) A well-meaning picture that tackles taboo issues.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2018
2/5 71% The Mercy (2017) Watching Crowhurst slowly crack is the cinema equivalent of filling your pockets with pebbles and chucking yourself into the Solent.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2018
1/5 25% The 15:17 to Paris (2018) Eastwood seems to lose interest in the story as the film unfolds. And if the director doesn't care enough to make sure each take is in focus, why should we?‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2018
4/5 97% Black Panther (2018) Even if it had nothing else going for it, Black Panther would still be the best-looking Marvel movie yet.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2018
78% Piercing (2018) A psycho-sexual horror show which lifts the lid on the twisted urges of two very troubled characters. It's great, if grisly, fun.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2018
2/5 54% 12 Strong (2018) Like so many muscles in Hollywood, it all feels rather fake: steroidal and pumped up rather than legitimately hard-won.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2018
3/5 51% Downsizing (2017) With his latest film, Alexander Payne finds himself teetering uncomfortably atop a high-concept device and wrestling with tonal clashes.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2018
4/5 87% The Nothing Factory (A Fábrica de Nada) (2017) This is the kind of bold film-making, bristling with risks and ideas, that shakes up cinema from the inside.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2018
3/5 75% Last Flag Flying (2017) A trio of terrific performances prevent this road movie from getting bogged down in its wallowing score and on-the-nose message.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2018
No Score Yet All You Can Eat Buddha (2017) While Lagarde's message is elusive, his talent for crafting arresting and macabre visual imagery is undeniable.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jan 24, 2018
No Score Yet Genesis 2.0 (2018) A fascinating, sometimes frightening film which, like its subjects, is perhaps a little too ambitious for its own good.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2018
80% Holiday (2018) Sascha is curious character; self-contained and self-obsessed but almost completely without self-determination. She is unformed and uninformed, guided by instinct, appetite and apathy rather than considered thought.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2018
88% Pity (2018) [Babis] Makridis employs several bold devices in the service of this scalding character study; the most striking of which is the use of droll intertitles which give an insight into a mind which is happiest being sad‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jan 19, 2018
81% Early Man (2018) The marketable Aardman spark of madcap inventiveness is slightly diluted here. Still, it's a very likeable film which should delight younger audiences.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2018
3/5 100% My Life Story (2018) If Suggs's anecdotes are not quite as entertaining as he thinks they are, it hardly matters, such is the disarmingly raffish charm of the delivery.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2018
3/5 83% The Brawler (Mukkabaaz) (2017) The dialogue is robustly filthy, the violence unflinching and the music loaded with innuendo.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2018
3/5 86% Darkest Hour (2017) It is unapologetically wordy. And at its best, this showcase for Churchill's ornate verbal flourishes is rousing and satisfying.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2018
2/5 70% Eric Clapton: A Life in 12 Bars (2017) This Clapton-approved portrait feels a little plodding and weirdly grudging with its insights.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2018
4/5 82% Molly's Game (2018) In the central role, Jessica Chastain is, quite simply, phenomenal.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2018
2/5 55% The Greatest Showman (2017) Imagine Tod Browning's 1932 pre-Code horror film Freaks asset-stripped by a third-rate Baz Luhrmann wannabe, the chilling refrain "one of us" sanitised into something closer to a soft-drink commercial tagline than a menace.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2017
1/5 32% Pitch Perfect 3 (2017) A-ca-trocious.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2017
4/5 100% Sanctuary (2016) A devastating conclusion leaves us with an aching sadness and some quite profound questions about the basic human right to love the person we choose.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2017
100% The Outlaws (2017) A robustly entertaining crime picture.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Dec 13, 2017
No Score Yet A Day (Ha-roo) (2017) Although the sheer intensity of the premise is a little exhausting, this is a tightly plotted conundrum of a movie which allows its audience barely a moment to catch breath.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Dec 13, 2017
100% Holy Air (2017) Holy Air provides a vivid snapshot of modern life in an ancient city.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
2/5 88% Better Watch Out (2017) A Yule-themed comedy horror that is neither funny, nor particularly horrifying, Better Watch Out feels like a malicious spin on Home Alone.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2017
4/5 93% Human Flow (2017) Through brief but intimate exchanges, Ai brings the individuals behind the statistics into focus.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2017
3/5 85% Blade of the Immortal (Mugen no jûnin) (2017) It's a stylish slash fest, which delivers visceral thrills along with quietly striking moments of beauty.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2017
3/5 81% Brigsby Bear (2017) Where the film best succeeds is in creating a credible character who has been insulated from the world he now finds himself flung into.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2017
2/5 46% The Dinner (2017) An absolutely first-rate cast is cut adrift in a sea of laboured, overwritten dialogue in this disappointing drama.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2017
2/5 91% Stronger (2017) With its swelling score and obligatory shots of noble, fluttering US flags, the film buys into the hero narrative wholesale.‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2017
71% Ferdinand (2017) This sweet-natured animation is a wisp of a thing. That's not to say it doesn't pack plenty of charm.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2017
No Score Yet Fork Lane (Pokeurein) (2017) This sobering look at the human cost of combat - both to the families of the dead, and to the men who pulled the trigger - is handsomely photographed and thought-provoking.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2017
No Score Yet Secret Ingredient (Iscelitel) (2017) Although on the surface, this is a crime caper, the film works most satisfyingly as a study of the abrasive but loving relationship between father and son.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
No Score Yet Four Hands (Die Vierhändige) (2017) Smart writing and an unflinching relish when it comes to the scenes of violence make for a deftly handled genre piece.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
No Score Yet Asphyxia (Khafegi) (2017) Although character motivations might, at times, seem a little opaque, this film offers a commentary on a society in which even a successful woman is nothing unless she has a man's support.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
No Score Yet Vampire Clay (Chi o sû nendo) (2017) This schlocky Japanese horror about murderous, sentient modelling clay which creates havoc in a small provincial art school is so inept, you start to wonder if it's deliberately so.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
94% The Breadwinner (2017) Parvana's eloquent eyes convey the tragedy of a land under siege, and the terrible fate which befalls each family member in turn is beautifully animated.‐ Screen International
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
3/5 85% Brakes (2016) Some of it - the mortifying scenes featuring the brilliant Julia Davis, for example, or the hollow sense of loss in Kerry Fox's sequence - is rather wonderful. Other strands seem under-developed ...‐ Observer (UK)
Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2017