All About Eve Reviews

  • May 14, 2019

    The first time I've seen either Bette Davis or Marilyn Monroe in a motion picture, All About Eve is a passionate and often illuminating portrayal of an actress on the downturn of her career, making way for the next generation but not without a fight. Davis is an extraordinary screen presence, with a gravelly voice and all the facial expressions in the world, she realistically depicts a starlet who was once on top of the world but is now being forced to accept that the limelight may not be shining on her for much longer. The film goes on too long in many scenes and I found the screenplay to be unnecessarily verbose, with many conversations dragging on because the characters insist on delivering long, fancified answered or explanations when short, concise ones would do much better. But the highlights are the quality of the acting and the rivalry between Eve and Margot, which begins out friendly but slowly disintegrates into spitefulness and envy as one individual's success overtakes the other. Due to its length and excessive wordiness, I can't see myself rushing to see it again, but for a chance to see so many big names of the mid-20th century duking it out on screen in classic fashion, I'm very happy I've seen in once.

    The first time I've seen either Bette Davis or Marilyn Monroe in a motion picture, All About Eve is a passionate and often illuminating portrayal of an actress on the downturn of her career, making way for the next generation but not without a fight. Davis is an extraordinary screen presence, with a gravelly voice and all the facial expressions in the world, she realistically depicts a starlet who was once on top of the world but is now being forced to accept that the limelight may not be shining on her for much longer. The film goes on too long in many scenes and I found the screenplay to be unnecessarily verbose, with many conversations dragging on because the characters insist on delivering long, fancified answered or explanations when short, concise ones would do much better. But the highlights are the quality of the acting and the rivalry between Eve and Margot, which begins out friendly but slowly disintegrates into spitefulness and envy as one individual's success overtakes the other. Due to its length and excessive wordiness, I can't see myself rushing to see it again, but for a chance to see so many big names of the mid-20th century duking it out on screen in classic fashion, I'm very happy I've seen in once.

  • Apr 29, 2019

    One of those movies that stays with you afterwards. So very well acted by both Davis and Baxter. The storyline is timeless- be careful what you wish for!

    One of those movies that stays with you afterwards. So very well acted by both Davis and Baxter. The storyline is timeless- be careful what you wish for!

  • Mar 24, 2019

    Sizzling drama with shocking intrigue and satire of Hollywood. All About Eve (1950) is timeless because of its honest and blunt story about a girl wanting to be a star, even at the cost of the love and respect of those around her. Writer and director Joseph L. Mankiewicz simply rivets you with a tale of dazzling talent of shrewd betrayal. You have to care about filmmaking, Hollywood, celebrities, acting, casting, and fame to really appreciate All About Eve, but the basic narrative about treachery and jealousy is universal. Bette Davis is perfect as the jealous diva aging disgracefully with lewd biting remarks. Anne Baxter is sublime as the sweet and innocent pretender desiring fame and success above all. Baxter is particularly enchanting and terrifying in her complex role. With an all star supporting cast ranging from George Sanders to Marilyn Monroe herself, All About Eve captures the seedy underbelly of show business like never before! It's remarkable how Mankiewicz basically has many of his ensemble playing versions of themselves. He's satirizing and critiquing the shallow and disloyal Hollywood populace, while also admiring the film and theater industries. That is the key to All About Eve's success. Mankiewicz directed a classic about how much he clearly loved the movies and plays, but he must have felt compelled to address the lesser attributes to the world he lived in with All About Eve. It's all a vicious cycle of people using others for their own advantages in the end, but All About Eve is entertaining and devastating to witness unfold.

    Sizzling drama with shocking intrigue and satire of Hollywood. All About Eve (1950) is timeless because of its honest and blunt story about a girl wanting to be a star, even at the cost of the love and respect of those around her. Writer and director Joseph L. Mankiewicz simply rivets you with a tale of dazzling talent of shrewd betrayal. You have to care about filmmaking, Hollywood, celebrities, acting, casting, and fame to really appreciate All About Eve, but the basic narrative about treachery and jealousy is universal. Bette Davis is perfect as the jealous diva aging disgracefully with lewd biting remarks. Anne Baxter is sublime as the sweet and innocent pretender desiring fame and success above all. Baxter is particularly enchanting and terrifying in her complex role. With an all star supporting cast ranging from George Sanders to Marilyn Monroe herself, All About Eve captures the seedy underbelly of show business like never before! It's remarkable how Mankiewicz basically has many of his ensemble playing versions of themselves. He's satirizing and critiquing the shallow and disloyal Hollywood populace, while also admiring the film and theater industries. That is the key to All About Eve's success. Mankiewicz directed a classic about how much he clearly loved the movies and plays, but he must have felt compelled to address the lesser attributes to the world he lived in with All About Eve. It's all a vicious cycle of people using others for their own advantages in the end, but All About Eve is entertaining and devastating to witness unfold.

  • Mar 14, 2019

    The film boasts a big name cast but doesn't do a lot with it. The drama is there for sure, but I'm not much for films that are about filmmaking and theater. It's just an excuse for the Academy to stroke it's own arrogance generally and the "hardships" they endure. Everybody gives a good performance, but contrary to popular opinion I don't think even Davis put in an amazing performance. The film discusses the back-handedness of the theater and film industries, although this kind of thing is found in many other professions as well. I think the reason it won Best Picture is because it's a film where the Academy gets to feel important and they tend to gravitate to films like that. There were some comedic moments, but it wasn't much of a knee slapper, the drama and twist were good but formulaic and there are a number of plot holes that go unanswered. The film's message is that people will do anything to get into theater and mirrors a lot of the journeys that people took to get into it in the first place (like I said, it's why it appeals to them) and that you can't take everything someone says at face value, but I've found that is quite a cynical way to look at things. You can't be naive, but giving people the benefit of the doubt more often helps than harms, in my experience.

    The film boasts a big name cast but doesn't do a lot with it. The drama is there for sure, but I'm not much for films that are about filmmaking and theater. It's just an excuse for the Academy to stroke it's own arrogance generally and the "hardships" they endure. Everybody gives a good performance, but contrary to popular opinion I don't think even Davis put in an amazing performance. The film discusses the back-handedness of the theater and film industries, although this kind of thing is found in many other professions as well. I think the reason it won Best Picture is because it's a film where the Academy gets to feel important and they tend to gravitate to films like that. There were some comedic moments, but it wasn't much of a knee slapper, the drama and twist were good but formulaic and there are a number of plot holes that go unanswered. The film's message is that people will do anything to get into theater and mirrors a lot of the journeys that people took to get into it in the first place (like I said, it's why it appeals to them) and that you can't take everything someone says at face value, but I've found that is quite a cynical way to look at things. You can't be naive, but giving people the benefit of the doubt more often helps than harms, in my experience.

  • Feb 17, 2019

    Like so many of Mankiewicz's movies, overlong - but his legendary 1951 backstabbing backstage melodrama is leavened by excellent performances, a waspish screenplay by Mankiewicz himself, and lush production values. Claustrophobic and relentlessly cynical and very very theatrical.

    Like so many of Mankiewicz's movies, overlong - but his legendary 1951 backstabbing backstage melodrama is leavened by excellent performances, a waspish screenplay by Mankiewicz himself, and lush production values. Claustrophobic and relentlessly cynical and very very theatrical.

  • Nov 06, 2018

    This film was solid.

    This film was solid.

  • Oct 25, 2018

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    what awesome Band and great songs and attitude!! boxxy software have collection of all movies and years

  • Sep 26, 2018

    All about eve is a one of the most smartest movies I have ever seen. A story about fame, glory and backstabbing present in Hollywood. Every scene is deliberate. The films ending is shows the constant back stabbing in Hollywood the danger of fame and how the cycle continues

    All about eve is a one of the most smartest movies I have ever seen. A story about fame, glory and backstabbing present in Hollywood. Every scene is deliberate. The films ending is shows the constant back stabbing in Hollywood the danger of fame and how the cycle continues

  • Sep 24, 2018

    Its says a lot about Joseph L. Mankiewicz's All About Eve that 67 years after it's initial release it still holds up as one of the finest examples comic dramas ever shown on screen. It is a film that can be viewed as the rule book for aspiring screenwriters, the swift notes for student actors and a timely lesson to all film fans that a well told parable, with a smart dialogue and talented cast wins hands down over any CGI effects, camera tricks or show stopping stunts that technology can muster up. Based on the story The Wisdom of Eve by Mary Orr, All About Eve is an elegantly bitchy backstage story revolving around aspiring actress Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter). Tattered and forlorn, Eve shows up in the dressing room of Broadway mega-star Margo Channing (Bette Davis), weaving a melancholy life story to Margo and her friends. Taking pity on the girl, Margo takes Eve as her personal assistant. Before long, it becomes apparent that naive Eve is a Machiavellian conniver who cold-bloodily uses Margo, her director Bill Sampson (Gary Merill), Lloyd's wife Karen (Celeste Holm), and waspish critic Addison De Witt (George Sanders) to rise to the top of the theatrical heap. Thematically multi-layered, this sharp and witty written film won 6 Academy Awards, including Best Picture and a Best Supporting Actor for the magnificent George Sanders. In fact it has the unique honour of seeing two actresses and two actors nominated in the Best Actor/Best Actress category at the Academy Awards - a feat that has not been repeated since. Unsullied by the demands and technology of modern cinema, this classic Hollywood tale is a wonderful insight to the backstabbing backstage of Broadway as the heavy weight bout between these two divas comes fuelled with poisonous yet witty dialogue in a timely reminder that as the cliche goes "the don't make em like they used to"!

    Its says a lot about Joseph L. Mankiewicz's All About Eve that 67 years after it's initial release it still holds up as one of the finest examples comic dramas ever shown on screen. It is a film that can be viewed as the rule book for aspiring screenwriters, the swift notes for student actors and a timely lesson to all film fans that a well told parable, with a smart dialogue and talented cast wins hands down over any CGI effects, camera tricks or show stopping stunts that technology can muster up. Based on the story The Wisdom of Eve by Mary Orr, All About Eve is an elegantly bitchy backstage story revolving around aspiring actress Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter). Tattered and forlorn, Eve shows up in the dressing room of Broadway mega-star Margo Channing (Bette Davis), weaving a melancholy life story to Margo and her friends. Taking pity on the girl, Margo takes Eve as her personal assistant. Before long, it becomes apparent that naive Eve is a Machiavellian conniver who cold-bloodily uses Margo, her director Bill Sampson (Gary Merill), Lloyd's wife Karen (Celeste Holm), and waspish critic Addison De Witt (George Sanders) to rise to the top of the theatrical heap. Thematically multi-layered, this sharp and witty written film won 6 Academy Awards, including Best Picture and a Best Supporting Actor for the magnificent George Sanders. In fact it has the unique honour of seeing two actresses and two actors nominated in the Best Actor/Best Actress category at the Academy Awards - a feat that has not been repeated since. Unsullied by the demands and technology of modern cinema, this classic Hollywood tale is a wonderful insight to the backstabbing backstage of Broadway as the heavy weight bout between these two divas comes fuelled with poisonous yet witty dialogue in a timely reminder that as the cliche goes "the don't make em like they used to"!

  • Aug 30, 2018

    Some films rely on high-octane, hyper-kinetic action set pieces to keep eyes glued to the screen and butts raised just off their seats; other films drum up heart-pounding, ear-busting soundtracks; and others still dream up eye-popping, mind-blowing oneiric visuals. ALL ABOUT EVE, on the other hand, is, at bottom, all about the dialogue and its delivery, tongue-twisting words performed with gut-wrenching gusto, and so more in line with the stage than with the screen in that way. These words are like fireworks, explosive and exciting, made of music and crackling fire, dense with allusions and acidic with wit-and in a movie about the potential violence and power to wound of words when wielded by serpentine tongues, the screenplay is as much the star of the show as the cast, who sink their teeth into these wisecracks and whip snaps with relish.

    Some films rely on high-octane, hyper-kinetic action set pieces to keep eyes glued to the screen and butts raised just off their seats; other films drum up heart-pounding, ear-busting soundtracks; and others still dream up eye-popping, mind-blowing oneiric visuals. ALL ABOUT EVE, on the other hand, is, at bottom, all about the dialogue and its delivery, tongue-twisting words performed with gut-wrenching gusto, and so more in line with the stage than with the screen in that way. These words are like fireworks, explosive and exciting, made of music and crackling fire, dense with allusions and acidic with wit-and in a movie about the potential violence and power to wound of words when wielded by serpentine tongues, the screenplay is as much the star of the show as the cast, who sink their teeth into these wisecracks and whip snaps with relish.