Walking Tall Reviews

  • Jan 09, 2021

    ...the low budget works to make the film seem like its true.Yes based on a true story usually means less than 50 percent true.Whatever the case this is a great ,violent one man takes on all comers film.Not to be missed.

    ...the low budget works to make the film seem like its true.Yes based on a true story usually means less than 50 percent true.Whatever the case this is a great ,violent one man takes on all comers film.Not to be missed.

  • Jan 01, 2021

    Back when Walking Tall was originally released close to fifty years ago, I recall enjoying Buford Pusser's no-nonsense approach to law enforcement. While it's still somewhat entertaining, time has not been all that kind to the movie, which nowadays comes across as a mix of The Dukes of Hazard and Death Wish. Very loosely based on real events, one must ask: was Pusser a crusader for justice or a sanctimonious bully? In light of his destruction of evidence and a lack of interest in basic principles of due process, he seems to have become as morally repugnant as the criminals he was fighting. Regardless, despite its flaws, Joe Don Baker is pretty good as the stick-swinging lawman and there is plenty of action, if that's what you're in the mood for.

    Back when Walking Tall was originally released close to fifty years ago, I recall enjoying Buford Pusser's no-nonsense approach to law enforcement. While it's still somewhat entertaining, time has not been all that kind to the movie, which nowadays comes across as a mix of The Dukes of Hazard and Death Wish. Very loosely based on real events, one must ask: was Pusser a crusader for justice or a sanctimonious bully? In light of his destruction of evidence and a lack of interest in basic principles of due process, he seems to have become as morally repugnant as the criminals he was fighting. Regardless, despite its flaws, Joe Don Baker is pretty good as the stick-swinging lawman and there is plenty of action, if that's what you're in the mood for.

  • Oct 05, 2020

    This original version is certainly more credible than the Rock's remake. That believability adds to the enjoyment level of watching this film and gives it more of an emotional punch. It is easy to imagine a small county operating in this manner. There are some good action and fight sequences, especially for the times. Again, far more plausible than the remake. There is a bit too much time spent on the family, which leads to some pacing issues.

    This original version is certainly more credible than the Rock's remake. That believability adds to the enjoyment level of watching this film and gives it more of an emotional punch. It is easy to imagine a small county operating in this manner. There are some good action and fight sequences, especially for the times. Again, far more plausible than the remake. There is a bit too much time spent on the family, which leads to some pacing issues.

  • Aug 04, 2020

    Hard not to love this classic 70's gem. Based on the true story of Buford Pusser ( hard as nails Baker) Who with his young family return back to his childhood home but fall victim to the towns corruption & racism. Armed only with his home made baseball bat, Buford sets out to bring the corrupt town to justice,his way.

    Hard not to love this classic 70's gem. Based on the true story of Buford Pusser ( hard as nails Baker) Who with his young family return back to his childhood home but fall victim to the towns corruption & racism. Armed only with his home made baseball bat, Buford sets out to bring the corrupt town to justice,his way.

  • May 10, 2019

    Walking Tall is a decent film. It is about a Tennessee sheriff who almost single-handily cleaned up his small town of crime and corruption. Joe Don Baker and Elizabeth Hartman give okay performances. The script is a little slow in places. Phil Karlson did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the action.

    Walking Tall is a decent film. It is about a Tennessee sheriff who almost single-handily cleaned up his small town of crime and corruption. Joe Don Baker and Elizabeth Hartman give okay performances. The script is a little slow in places. Phil Karlson did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the action.

  • May 08, 2019

    The best movie character ever portrayed: Joe Don Baker as Buford Pusser!

    The best movie character ever portrayed: Joe Don Baker as Buford Pusser!

  • Apr 23, 2017

    Walking Tall is one of my all time favourites, I love the retro feel and the violent, paranoid story. Its about a simple honest guy who becomes sheriff and has to take on a whole bunch of corrupt assholes and ends up winning but pays a heavy price.

    Walking Tall is one of my all time favourites, I love the retro feel and the violent, paranoid story. Its about a simple honest guy who becomes sheriff and has to take on a whole bunch of corrupt assholes and ends up winning but pays a heavy price.

  • May 21, 2016

    Joe Don Baker kicks some serious ass in this Straw Dogs wannabe...that works!!!1

    Joe Don Baker kicks some serious ass in this Straw Dogs wannabe...that works!!!1

  • May 21, 2016

    Probably my favorite example of rednecksploitation. The great Joe Don Baker plays 2x4 swinging Tennessee sheriff Buford Pusser The story is based upon the real-life exploits of Sheriff Pusser (a name no one would ever make up for a movie) and the story goes that he's wronged by a corrupt local sheriff and backwoods crime boss. Passer runs for sheriff and then seeks to clean up his town. The story is nothing all that special, but the film is undeniably compelling. What I also love about this film is that it practically feels like a subculture type of film, revealing a world I'd previously had no idea existed, There are plenty of violent revenge exploitation pictures, but few of them feature a paunchy hero, crime bosses who look like friends of your grandparents, action heros and villains driving around station wagons (or occasionally tractors), odd looking backwoods bar/gambling house/den of ill repute in what looks like a couple double wides slammed together, and very sketchy looking moonshine stills. I could go on, but this film really seems to be a glimpse of a very odd American south of the early 70s, which almost seems like it's in a time warp when compared to other films coming out this same year, like "Across 110th Street." I have no idea if this is an accurate portrayal of the place and time, but regardless of the films story and actions, which are excellent, I would have found the film fascinating to just watch this depiction of rural southern life (not that I'd ever want to be a part of it). I'm sure it was not the intention of director Phil Karlson, a talented journeyman director with film credits going back to the 1940s, but this film is arguably as good as a Wim Wenders or Werner Herzog film in terms of capturing a time and place on film. Now don't get me wrong, this film is absolutely not high hart and is pure grindhouse exploitation, but it is exploitation of the first order. Overall, this is not a film for all tastes, but if this sort of drive-in fare is your thing, it's a wildly compelling and entertaining film.

    Probably my favorite example of rednecksploitation. The great Joe Don Baker plays 2x4 swinging Tennessee sheriff Buford Pusser The story is based upon the real-life exploits of Sheriff Pusser (a name no one would ever make up for a movie) and the story goes that he's wronged by a corrupt local sheriff and backwoods crime boss. Passer runs for sheriff and then seeks to clean up his town. The story is nothing all that special, but the film is undeniably compelling. What I also love about this film is that it practically feels like a subculture type of film, revealing a world I'd previously had no idea existed, There are plenty of violent revenge exploitation pictures, but few of them feature a paunchy hero, crime bosses who look like friends of your grandparents, action heros and villains driving around station wagons (or occasionally tractors), odd looking backwoods bar/gambling house/den of ill repute in what looks like a couple double wides slammed together, and very sketchy looking moonshine stills. I could go on, but this film really seems to be a glimpse of a very odd American south of the early 70s, which almost seems like it's in a time warp when compared to other films coming out this same year, like "Across 110th Street." I have no idea if this is an accurate portrayal of the place and time, but regardless of the films story and actions, which are excellent, I would have found the film fascinating to just watch this depiction of rural southern life (not that I'd ever want to be a part of it). I'm sure it was not the intention of director Phil Karlson, a talented journeyman director with film credits going back to the 1940s, but this film is arguably as good as a Wim Wenders or Werner Herzog film in terms of capturing a time and place on film. Now don't get me wrong, this film is absolutely not high hart and is pure grindhouse exploitation, but it is exploitation of the first order. Overall, this is not a film for all tastes, but if this sort of drive-in fare is your thing, it's a wildly compelling and entertaining film.

  • Dec 16, 2014

    Sem ser um filme extraordinário, "Walking Tall" é de toda a relevância na evolução da figura do vigilante no cinema norte-americano. Nessa linhagem de justiceiros inconformados, o homem de família Buford Pusser (inspirado pelo Xerife com o mesmo nome) tem a particularidade de ser um ex-wrestler que fugiu a um sistema para encontrar outro ainda mais vicioso (um county totalmente manipulado por chulos e bootleggers). A esse aspecto curioso junta-se o facto de Pusser intervir normalmente com um grande pau na mão (o que naturalmente lhe confere uma presença bíblica), em vez da habitual arma de fogo. Mas armas é coisa que não falta ao inferno sulista de "Walking Tall" e esta história claramente pro-violência parece, a partir de certa altura, defender que até os putos devem pegar numa espingarda, se isso for necessário para proteger a família. Meia-estrela é inteiramente atribuída ao carisma de Joe Don Baker neste que deve ser o filme de culto de muitos associados do NRA.

    Sem ser um filme extraordinário, "Walking Tall" é de toda a relevância na evolução da figura do vigilante no cinema norte-americano. Nessa linhagem de justiceiros inconformados, o homem de família Buford Pusser (inspirado pelo Xerife com o mesmo nome) tem a particularidade de ser um ex-wrestler que fugiu a um sistema para encontrar outro ainda mais vicioso (um county totalmente manipulado por chulos e bootleggers). A esse aspecto curioso junta-se o facto de Pusser intervir normalmente com um grande pau na mão (o que naturalmente lhe confere uma presença bíblica), em vez da habitual arma de fogo. Mas armas é coisa que não falta ao inferno sulista de "Walking Tall" e esta história claramente pro-violência parece, a partir de certa altura, defender que até os putos devem pegar numa espingarda, se isso for necessário para proteger a família. Meia-estrela é inteiramente atribuída ao carisma de Joe Don Baker neste que deve ser o filme de culto de muitos associados do NRA.