Brad's Status Reviews

  • Sep 13, 2019

    unsuccessful decent father and college going decent son relationship

    unsuccessful decent father and college going decent son relationship

  • Sep 07, 2019

    Good film with good quotes

    Good film with good quotes

  • Jul 21, 2019

    Good flick with great performances.. Stiller plays his role really well.. I LOVED the performance of Shazi Raja in her supporting bit part. Really enjoy indy type films like this

    Good flick with great performances.. Stiller plays his role really well.. I LOVED the performance of Shazi Raja in her supporting bit part. Really enjoy indy type films like this

  • Jun 20, 2019

    Brads statice was an interesting movie around a boy who is headed to university he really doesn't tell his parents everything about his life they don't discover this until they're already on the plane to Find the University of his dreams however the story becomes more about his father his friends and what his future will hold Great story to pass the time probably something I wouldn't watch again but it's good for a one time watch I watched it on Stan

    Brads statice was an interesting movie around a boy who is headed to university he really doesn't tell his parents everything about his life they don't discover this until they're already on the plane to Find the University of his dreams however the story becomes more about his father his friends and what his future will hold Great story to pass the time probably something I wouldn't watch again but it's good for a one time watch I watched it on Stan

  • Jun 16, 2019

    Very realistic events

    Very realistic events

  • Nov 13, 2018

    Stiller (Brad) is completely self absorbed and irritating. His level of selfishness is unheard of. It is impossible to root for him. A guy with no real problems who is obsessed with the grass being greener and waxing nostalgic for his youth and the potential he wasted. Are we supposed to think a happily married father with a career is a failure and then feel sorry for him? I just want to punch his ungrateful spoiled face.

    Stiller (Brad) is completely self absorbed and irritating. His level of selfishness is unheard of. It is impossible to root for him. A guy with no real problems who is obsessed with the grass being greener and waxing nostalgic for his youth and the potential he wasted. Are we supposed to think a happily married father with a career is a failure and then feel sorry for him? I just want to punch his ungrateful spoiled face.

  • Oct 28, 2018

    Brad's Status is a depressing but insightful mainstream drama.

    Brad's Status is a depressing but insightful mainstream drama.

  • Oct 16, 2018

    Delicate take on a mid-life crisis.

    Delicate take on a mid-life crisis.

  • Sep 09, 2018

    Must see for all middle aged married white men lamenting the loss of youth and prospects. Beautifully written. Austin Abrams outstanding.

    Must see for all middle aged married white men lamenting the loss of youth and prospects. Beautifully written. Austin Abrams outstanding.

  • Sep 07, 2018

    I wish this movie was funnier. There's some laughs to be had in Brad's fantasies about how his friend's lives work. The absurdly over the top nature of the fronts they have put up to the world. But ultimately it just feels like the movie takes its protagonist's existential whining too seriously. I knew I was going to not like Brad within the first five minutes, when it cuts from him looking at the extravagant lives of his former friends, his inner monologue pining for their wealth, to a shot of his gigantic bedroom where he's laying next to Jenna Fisher. Oh woah is me, I'm successful in my field but not obscenely wealthy, oh no. It feels like the movie never adequately addresses how lucky Brad actually is. The closest it comes is an idealistic young college student calling him out on his bullshit, he thinks about it for a second, and then goes back to imagining her in a bikini in the next scene. Instead of tearing down Brad's fantasies, the script instead tears down the people he has the fantasies about. This is a movie where kids are considered entitled for knowing what the word cisgender means, and young women are compared to "the world;" an object to be admired from afar. The plot steps on cliche after cliche: Brad spending a lot of money to save face, feeling inadequate when walking through the first class section of a plane, most of the phone calls end because the character on the other end strangely decided to call just before doing something incredibly urgent. The score is good, though overused, and there is some good photography going on here. The acting is really solid across the board, Ben Stiller does his best to make Brad an empathetic presence, and the dialogue between him and Austin Abrams is often the best part of the movie, as are any of the scenes that get Brad out of his head for a bit. But the attempts at insight, at analyzing the difference between our real lives and what we present to the world, are hit-and-miss. Maybe it just because I can't connect, I was far more interested in what Brad's son was going through. But if the movie had taken a few more jabs at Brad's entitled world view, given him a moment to take himself less seriously, then I would have left the movie less annoyed. Also I don't really understand why all of his narration was in the past tense. There was no framing device where he's telling the story later, so it felt a little awkward.

    I wish this movie was funnier. There's some laughs to be had in Brad's fantasies about how his friend's lives work. The absurdly over the top nature of the fronts they have put up to the world. But ultimately it just feels like the movie takes its protagonist's existential whining too seriously. I knew I was going to not like Brad within the first five minutes, when it cuts from him looking at the extravagant lives of his former friends, his inner monologue pining for their wealth, to a shot of his gigantic bedroom where he's laying next to Jenna Fisher. Oh woah is me, I'm successful in my field but not obscenely wealthy, oh no. It feels like the movie never adequately addresses how lucky Brad actually is. The closest it comes is an idealistic young college student calling him out on his bullshit, he thinks about it for a second, and then goes back to imagining her in a bikini in the next scene. Instead of tearing down Brad's fantasies, the script instead tears down the people he has the fantasies about. This is a movie where kids are considered entitled for knowing what the word cisgender means, and young women are compared to "the world;" an object to be admired from afar. The plot steps on cliche after cliche: Brad spending a lot of money to save face, feeling inadequate when walking through the first class section of a plane, most of the phone calls end because the character on the other end strangely decided to call just before doing something incredibly urgent. The score is good, though overused, and there is some good photography going on here. The acting is really solid across the board, Ben Stiller does his best to make Brad an empathetic presence, and the dialogue between him and Austin Abrams is often the best part of the movie, as are any of the scenes that get Brad out of his head for a bit. But the attempts at insight, at analyzing the difference between our real lives and what we present to the world, are hit-and-miss. Maybe it just because I can't connect, I was far more interested in what Brad's son was going through. But if the movie had taken a few more jabs at Brad's entitled world view, given him a moment to take himself less seriously, then I would have left the movie less annoyed. Also I don't really understand why all of his narration was in the past tense. There was no framing device where he's telling the story later, so it felt a little awkward.