Broadway Danny Rose Reviews

  • Jan 04, 2020

    Characters who love the entertainment industry and the artists that populate it are not rare in Woody Allen films but this is probably his most worshipful depiction of them. He takes on the titular role and while he is a nebbish Jewish man as you would expect from Allen he gives one of his deeper characterizations and makes us care for our hapless lead. However the film is probably best remembered for the performance of Mia Farrow who gives a surprisingly showy performance in a role that is the polar opposite of that which she plays in the following year's The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985). I found the film enjoyable and Farrow was a pleasant surprise but I would not rank it among his best and found parts of it a tad derivative of his other work. Danny Rose, the titular character, is what keeps you invested in the film even when it veers off track as his tireless devotion to his clients and genuine passion for seeing them perform well in every aspect of life is admirable. In this film most of his focus is directed toward alcoholic lounge singer Lou Canova, Nick Apollo Forte, who is overweight and only experienced a brief burst of stardom but has a massive ego and is extremely needy. We get the sense though that Rose seeks out this sort of talent and would not be happy if he did not have some client calling on him all the time. The two complement one another as Canova begins nervously drinking before a big performance while Rose tracks down his difficult new mistress. Of course they head off on a caper that ends with Rose almost being shot by the mistress's brothers who are affiliated with organized crime. You just accept the bonkers events that occur and head off with these two zany characters grounded in reality by Farrow and Allen. They have such fun together and we enjoy watching them get on each other's nerves and then realize they have something in common. Her ultimate betrayal stings but we know that it is in Rose's nature to take her back and there is something sweet to the fact that they reconcile.

    Characters who love the entertainment industry and the artists that populate it are not rare in Woody Allen films but this is probably his most worshipful depiction of them. He takes on the titular role and while he is a nebbish Jewish man as you would expect from Allen he gives one of his deeper characterizations and makes us care for our hapless lead. However the film is probably best remembered for the performance of Mia Farrow who gives a surprisingly showy performance in a role that is the polar opposite of that which she plays in the following year's The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985). I found the film enjoyable and Farrow was a pleasant surprise but I would not rank it among his best and found parts of it a tad derivative of his other work. Danny Rose, the titular character, is what keeps you invested in the film even when it veers off track as his tireless devotion to his clients and genuine passion for seeing them perform well in every aspect of life is admirable. In this film most of his focus is directed toward alcoholic lounge singer Lou Canova, Nick Apollo Forte, who is overweight and only experienced a brief burst of stardom but has a massive ego and is extremely needy. We get the sense though that Rose seeks out this sort of talent and would not be happy if he did not have some client calling on him all the time. The two complement one another as Canova begins nervously drinking before a big performance while Rose tracks down his difficult new mistress. Of course they head off on a caper that ends with Rose almost being shot by the mistress's brothers who are affiliated with organized crime. You just accept the bonkers events that occur and head off with these two zany characters grounded in reality by Farrow and Allen. They have such fun together and we enjoy watching them get on each other's nerves and then realize they have something in common. Her ultimate betrayal stings but we know that it is in Rose's nature to take her back and there is something sweet to the fact that they reconcile.

  • Jul 11, 2019

    Why does Adam Sandler keep remaking Woody Allen films? Because they are this good.

    Why does Adam Sandler keep remaking Woody Allen films? Because they are this good.

  • Feb 21, 2019

    Of all the Woody Allen films I've seen, this is the one that I go back to on more occasions than the others. It's amusing, funny, poignant, and engaging. Danny Rose, a talent agent with a stable full of the lowest level performers in the business, is also a kind-hearted, gentle and caring manager for his group of misfits. I love the scenes in the Carnegie Deli, and the stories told about Danny and the misfortunes that fill his life.

    Of all the Woody Allen films I've seen, this is the one that I go back to on more occasions than the others. It's amusing, funny, poignant, and engaging. Danny Rose, a talent agent with a stable full of the lowest level performers in the business, is also a kind-hearted, gentle and caring manager for his group of misfits. I love the scenes in the Carnegie Deli, and the stories told about Danny and the misfortunes that fill his life.

  • Jan 27, 2019

    The best comedy movie ever made!

    The best comedy movie ever made!

  • Dec 16, 2016

    Crazy fun. Really appreciated the old school laughs.

    Crazy fun. Really appreciated the old school laughs.

  • Aug 06, 2016

    not a great movie, definitely not worth the time

    not a great movie, definitely not worth the time

  • Jul 21, 2016

    Charming middle-weight fairy tale about a low life talent manager with a heart of gold. Allen channels Groucho and Mia Farrow turns heads with her hard edged Brooklynite Queen. Like the small acts he represents, BDR surprises with its wit, wisdom and magic tricks. See also: Purple Rose of Cairo

    Charming middle-weight fairy tale about a low life talent manager with a heart of gold. Allen channels Groucho and Mia Farrow turns heads with her hard edged Brooklynite Queen. Like the small acts he represents, BDR surprises with its wit, wisdom and magic tricks. See also: Purple Rose of Cairo

  • Jun 23, 2016

    One of Allen's sharpest films, Broadway Danny Rose is both funny and affecting due to the easy chemistry between its leads.

    One of Allen's sharpest films, Broadway Danny Rose is both funny and affecting due to the easy chemistry between its leads.

  • Jun 04, 2016

    Mia Farrow is spectacular! The chemistry between her and Woody Allen is a treat to watch. They get into ridiculous situations together driving the plot along nicely. The way the story is told though a bunch of guys at Carnegie Deli is awesome. I didn't want it to end!

    Mia Farrow is spectacular! The chemistry between her and Woody Allen is a treat to watch. They get into ridiculous situations together driving the plot along nicely. The way the story is told though a bunch of guys at Carnegie Deli is awesome. I didn't want it to end!

  • May 30, 2016

    Likable but Woody Allen comedy/drama about a low level entertainment agent, Danny Rose, who books the likes of balloon animal acts or people who make music on wine glasses. Rose gets his big break with a washed up Italian lounge singer, Nick Apollo Forte, but gets sucked into the singer's personal drama involving his mistress played by Mia Farrow, who plays a very out-of-character type of role as a brassy broad, but does it well. The film is shot in black and white by the great Gordon Willis and the story told in flashbacks by a group of agents sitting in a deli swapping stories about Broadway Danny Rose, with Sandy Baron narrating the main story. I think my main complaint is the film's absurd Felliniesque moments seem out of place with the film's dramatic elements. They would have worked if the film was a straight comedy, but costumed superheroes showing up in the middle of a field or women in bird costumes, seem out of place if we were to take the drama seriously. Still, getting to see Allen do stand-up in a Catskills or the bits involving stuttering ventriloquist are just pure cinema magic. It's a flawed film, but it's also kind of magic.

    Likable but Woody Allen comedy/drama about a low level entertainment agent, Danny Rose, who books the likes of balloon animal acts or people who make music on wine glasses. Rose gets his big break with a washed up Italian lounge singer, Nick Apollo Forte, but gets sucked into the singer's personal drama involving his mistress played by Mia Farrow, who plays a very out-of-character type of role as a brassy broad, but does it well. The film is shot in black and white by the great Gordon Willis and the story told in flashbacks by a group of agents sitting in a deli swapping stories about Broadway Danny Rose, with Sandy Baron narrating the main story. I think my main complaint is the film's absurd Felliniesque moments seem out of place with the film's dramatic elements. They would have worked if the film was a straight comedy, but costumed superheroes showing up in the middle of a field or women in bird costumes, seem out of place if we were to take the drama seriously. Still, getting to see Allen do stand-up in a Catskills or the bits involving stuttering ventriloquist are just pure cinema magic. It's a flawed film, but it's also kind of magic.