Stephen King's 'Cat's Eye' - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Stephen King's 'Cat's Eye' Reviews

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½ September 10, 2017
Drew Barrymore's second Stephen King movie role is a wicked and fun treat. With three stories all in a cat's perspective, this movie is exciting, daring, and even a little amusing.
½ August 13, 2017
Stephen King returns to anthology horror after the success of his "Creepshow" collaboration with George A. Romero. This time the stories are less EC Comics and more Twilight Zone and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. The first tale involves James Woods going to a clinic run by Alan King to help him quit smoking. What he doesn't expect is their extreme methods, which include people constantly spying on him, torturing family members, and people hiding inside his house. Woods is, as always, intense and compelling as the haggard man and brings a lot of a fairly thin story. The second story is about Robert Hays taking a bet from a Las Vegas high roller who he's wronged that he can't make his way all the way around a high rise casino along the narrow ledge. This entry had a nice throwback feel to the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Man from the South," which was based upon a Roald Dahl short story about a high roller who bets a desperate gambler he can't light his lighter 10 times in a row or else he has to let the rich man chop off an keep a finger. The third tale is the best and the one that's closest to traditional horror. Drew Barrymore plays a little girl who keeps telling her parents there's a monster living in her wall, but her parents don't believe her, even though there really is a creepy little monster. I think what I liked most about this segment are the Incredible Shrinking Man style of special effects used to animate the tiny monster, particularly when it's a regular-sized actor in costume on a giant set interacting with giant props. Loved that! There's a wraparound story about a stray cat who passes through each story, but it's really not much of a story and the cat doesn't play any role in the other stories until the final one. Apparently there was originally more to the wrap around, but it was cut out of the film. Besides the above named actors, there is also Kenneth McMillan, James Rebhorn, Mike Starr, James Naughton, Charles S. Dutton, and voice artist Frank Welker, who's voiced everything from The Smurfs to Scooby Doo to Futurama to Aladin and the Lion King. Welker is credited as Special Vocal Effects, which I'm guessing is the creepy little monster living in the wall. Also of note is that the film was photographed Jack Cardiff, who has shot everything from "The African Queen" to "The Red Shoes" to "Rambo," so the film does look gorgeous. Overall, this isn't the best King film adaptation, but it's far from the worse, and falls somewhere in the slightly above average range.
August 12, 2017
I do like the idea of Stephen King multi-verse. all the movies are their own worlds were other stories connect, and the "dark tower" is supposed to separate and protect them all from this "dark outer realm" that these creatures that infest and,plague most of the king stories example: the mist, it, the stand etc. but because of the man in black "who by the way is Randall flag" is attacking the towers and letting these monsters slip into those worlds. And that is why Pennywise the dancing clown is actually a giant spider. Our heroes with the "shining" ability have been put through out king's stories to help protect the the dark tower. I would have liked these movies to have put more emphasis on that. possibly leading to a much larger story.
½ August 5, 2017
Though rather dated now, this is actually a decent bunch of tales all linked by a cat who appears in each one. The final story brings the cat front and centre who becomes the hero of the peice. No classic but it's quite good nonetheless.
½ March 25, 2017
It's a fun sort of ridiculousness, but fails to do anything worthwhile.
½ October 23, 2016
I first saw this anthology film of stories by Stephen King many years ago, but it stuck with me. It stars James Woods, Drew Barrymore, and Robert Hays and 3 separate tales that blend humour and suspense. It's not scary, but it is clever and fairly entertaining. If you like the genre, then it's worth a watch.
½ September 1, 2016
A lot of King adaptations are inherently corny, especially the run of mid 80s ones. However, this is at least done with a little bit of a wink and a nod, so it isn't the worst. James Woods getting 25 minutes or so to chew scenes is enjoyable, and the gimmick of the cat moving from story to story is at least fun.
½ July 30, 2016
Not quite as good as Creepshow, however still a pass on entertainment. I enjoy watching this with my cat because he watches too. That's the best thing about it ;)
July 27, 2016
Nothing great, but it's vintage King, and it's fun as heck (excuse my language).
June 15, 2016
An anthology film of three Stephen King stories (two adapted from stories in the "Night Shift" collection and one written for the film) rather tenuously tied together by the presence of a cat. The tone of the film is established rather early when the cat is chased by Cujo and almost run over by Christine during the opening credits. This film is very light in tone ... too light. The two stories based on previous material have their highlights ... James Woods is good in the first one ... but they are far too comic in tone to generate any suspense. The original story with Drew Barrymore and the cat fighting off a troll is just awful. This really just isn't worth investing any time in.
½ April 15, 2016
a very short anthology film but an original piece of work by Stephen King himself
all 3 stories center around a cat that goes from place to place witnessing one horrific event to the next
the first story is about what happens to a smoker when he ignores quitting more than he should, the second story involves the consequences of adultery as well as greed, and the final story is the dangers of a small child's imagination
Drew Barrymore at a young age actually makes quite a few appearances in all of them
the last story in my opinion is the most imaginative cause it feels very Speilberg-ish with a monstrous troll
plus there are a lot of nods to his previous works and it clearly shows
a timekiller of a movie
March 20, 2016
James woods is fantastic and the 3 stories blend together fairly successfully. An original and often humorous film, and the best Stephen King film behind the shining, misery and Carrie
½ February 6, 2016
Very good, only thing I have enjoyed her in.
December 30, 2015
3 tails and a star 4 each one
½ September 25, 2015
Pretty fun little anthology. I love all the little Stephen King references in it.
September 24, 2015
another film I've only caught bits of
July 29, 2015
Very Good Movie This is In My Category cause I Love Dogs and Cats I Love Animals
July 17, 2015
I thought it would be better slow moving to me
½ July 10, 2015
Cats Eye is a pretty good Stephen King anthology film that incorporates several visual nods to his other films/book. There are three stories that make up the film all being tied together with the cat.
The 1st story is Quitters Inc. it deals with a guy that goes to a company that specializes in helping you kick the habit of smoking. To say they have extreme measures of getting you to quit is a understatement. Very good story here.
The 2nd story is the weakest of the bunch and really not that interesting compared to the other two. It's called The Ledge and deals with a mobster who gets revenge on a guy who is sleeping with his wife. However, the tables end up turning on the mobster. It's interesting to note that the 1st two stories come from Kings book, Night Shift while the third was written for the film.
Which is called General and it's the best of the three. It involves the cat, a killer troll and a little girl. Very similar to the Trilogy Of Terror episode Amelia with the Zulu Warrior doll that comes to life. The troll itself is a lot of fun to watch as it fights with the cat and the little girl.
Over all the film is pretty entertaining and lends itself to repeat viewing. Look for all the Stephen Book/film references through out the movie. Some are obvious and some are hidden.
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