Chi-Raq Reviews

  • Jan 02, 2020

    This movie was very intriguing...I thought the main focus on stopping the violence was an success. I love spike lee with his mental thinking...I will tell everyone about this....

    This movie was very intriguing...I thought the main focus on stopping the violence was an success. I love spike lee with his mental thinking...I will tell everyone about this....

  • Sep 02, 2019

    Must Watch! Brilliantly Funny! Dave Still The Man! Had Me in Stitch's, The Truth is a Magical Thing! Funny HaHa Again, Must Watch!

    Must Watch! Brilliantly Funny! Dave Still The Man! Had Me in Stitch's, The Truth is a Magical Thing! Funny HaHa Again, Must Watch!

  • Oct 25, 2018

    Clever movie but, the rhyming was a little elementary at times. Great idea of expounding this movie from the original literary piece!!! That bed scene almost to the end was SUPER LAME!!!

    Clever movie but, the rhyming was a little elementary at times. Great idea of expounding this movie from the original literary piece!!! That bed scene almost to the end was SUPER LAME!!!

  • May 17, 2018

    Powerful from the opening.

    Powerful from the opening.

  • Mar 18, 2018

    Employing verse-based rhyming dialogue and Samuel L. Jackson as the fourth-wall-breaking narrator, Spike Lee's reimagination of the Greek satire Lysistrata is a provoking and apoplectic commentary on gun violence in Chicago whose title is a portmanteau of Chicago and Iraq.

    Employing verse-based rhyming dialogue and Samuel L. Jackson as the fourth-wall-breaking narrator, Spike Lee's reimagination of the Greek satire Lysistrata is a provoking and apoplectic commentary on gun violence in Chicago whose title is a portmanteau of Chicago and Iraq.

  • Jan 11, 2018

    It is so messy and never on par with 'Do the right thing'. Hope the technical aspect was simple as the 1989 classic that would have made this movie a cult classic. Disappointing at the end as this is a Lee joint!

    It is so messy and never on par with 'Do the right thing'. Hope the technical aspect was simple as the 1989 classic that would have made this movie a cult classic. Disappointing at the end as this is a Lee joint!

  • Dec 29, 2017

    I give is this a 91/A-.

    I give is this a 91/A-.

  • Dec 16, 2017

    This movie is not for the average person - there's not a lot of blood and gore and violence. It's written in prose and requires attention, so most folks in the 144-characters age can't follow along and appreciate it's beauty and art.

    This movie is not for the average person - there's not a lot of blood and gore and violence. It's written in prose and requires attention, so most folks in the 144-characters age can't follow along and appreciate it's beauty and art.

  • Nov 10, 2017

    Horrible movie about a tragic situation. it could have been so much more.

    Horrible movie about a tragic situation. it could have been so much more.

  • Sep 25, 2017

    It would be easier to just list adjectives-vital, ambitious, striking, challenging, playful, literary, black, universal, uneven-than to actually define this sui generis film. Of its many layers, ranging from satire to jeremiad to opera buffa, to me the most powerful is the sheer form of Spike's adaptation: In updating a work of Ancient Greek comedy for modern day Chicago, Lee joins the ranks of so many canonical artists-Joyce, the Cohens, Bernstein, and so on-by appropriating the past to speak to the future. For a black artist, whose culture is continually and violently whitewashed, to reverse this act in an appropriation of the roots of European culture is profound and powerful and politically persuasive. While the movie might stumble here and there, running somewhat too long and languishing in its laments-Spike is aware of the dramatic difficulty he inherits from Aristophanes, setting the cathartic ending in a fantasy, semi-Brechtian setting-the sheer gambit on display here is stunning, moving, and necessary.

    It would be easier to just list adjectives-vital, ambitious, striking, challenging, playful, literary, black, universal, uneven-than to actually define this sui generis film. Of its many layers, ranging from satire to jeremiad to opera buffa, to me the most powerful is the sheer form of Spike's adaptation: In updating a work of Ancient Greek comedy for modern day Chicago, Lee joins the ranks of so many canonical artists-Joyce, the Cohens, Bernstein, and so on-by appropriating the past to speak to the future. For a black artist, whose culture is continually and violently whitewashed, to reverse this act in an appropriation of the roots of European culture is profound and powerful and politically persuasive. While the movie might stumble here and there, running somewhat too long and languishing in its laments-Spike is aware of the dramatic difficulty he inherits from Aristophanes, setting the cathartic ending in a fantasy, semi-Brechtian setting-the sheer gambit on display here is stunning, moving, and necessary.