The Darjeeling Limited - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Darjeeling Limited Reviews

Page 1 of 955
March 26, 2017
"We haven't located us yet." Three brothers are on an undefined, quixotic spiritual journey with the subconscious goal of coming together. They meet challenges along the way - their first stop off the Darjeeling train is at a very capitalist market in India, which is anything but spiritual. They soon find out that this trip isn't as vague as it appears, and there is a specific goal: to find their mother, who lives in a convent... they don't know whether or not she'll accept them. Apparently she's a nun, as told to us by Brendan, the private detective.

Francis is that controlling big brother who kind of acts like a bully, but he's subtle and sweet about it. But the brothers can't take it, erupting into a brawl that gets them evicted from the train. They've also gotten a letter from Sister Patricia Whitman, who is their mother, asking them not to come. Now everything seems hopelessly pointless.

There's a strategically placed scene by a campfire, which seems to put our minds at ease about a situation that should be uneasy. Anderson seems self-aware here, that we the audience don't usually feel much danger in his boxed world, we're never too far off the beaten path given his visual style; we're safe. So he follows it with a scene that changes our perception of him, the Whitmans encountering boys in trouble at a river. Peter is unable to save the last boy, a shocking turn, our first bit of realism with quirky humor: encountering death. They are further off the path now, resorting to the Indian village of the deceased boy. The father of the boy grieves, Peter getting his own spiritual taste, feeling for the guilty and remorseful for his inability to save the boy. It seems like the spirituality should be dwindling, but not for Peter, who is glad to be invited to the boy's funeral instead of being outcast.

There's an abrupt jump that confused me - they're out of India, Francis' bandages removed, Jack's mustache shaved; I didn't know if it was flashing back or ahead. We meet Alice, Peter's wife, who we've only heard about for nearly an hour. But the hour mark itself shows us a big change from where we were earlier: the brothers are united, looking almost like a gang as they back a tow trucker down who gets in their way. They're uniform. But the scene is capped with Francis withholding information - they seem united, but yet again he demonstrates his historical controlling nature.

The prototypical Wes Anderson boxed-staging is represented a few minutes later... pan from brothers waiting for bus, to the cattle in front of them, to the boy on their left, and then to the path on their right. The camera is at it's own four-way intersection, swiveling to capture a perfectly centered shot at each pivot point. Anderson also accompanies his film with tremendous musical choices that complement the flavor, style, tone, and energy of each scene.

As we near the end of the film, the ultimate symbolism appears to match an earlier shot of Peter running onto the back of Darjeeling with his luggage, this time contrasted by all the brothers running onto a train, but tossing their luggage aside. This tends to be the result of these larking movies, it's about letting it all go, leaving it all behind to get somewhere else in life, cutting cords with the weight that's held them down for so long, everything they've been holding on to. It's an unsatisfying ending for me because I don't agree with this so-called spiritual moment. It's a popular view among spiritualists to let go of everything and just be this naked animal in the world. But I think it shows a lack of appreciation for the things we gather in life.

I've seen a lot of loose threaded movies lately, leaving so much story incomplete, and not always for the sake of a sequel. It's frustrating, there's obviously more story to tell. The film is missing a whole third act. It felt like we reached the end of act two and are gearing up for another 25-30 minutes of film, but the credits roll. It's also displeasing to have the likes of Bill Murray and Natalie Portman making mere cameos. It looked like Murray had a story to tell, but it was a tease, and he's set aside.
March 7, 2017
Really good again Wes!!! I know this is probably controversial as its usually seen as sub par but I really enjoyed the film. It's not as good as Grand Budapest Hotel but its still up there with the Royal Tenenbaums. The small main cast allows for some great development of characters, with themes which float along whilst your watching and require a second viewing. Definitely nice to see a Wes Anderson movie set in India. Would love to see what he could do with other exotic settings. The Soundtrack....my god its good. Its joint best, in my opinion, with The Royal Tenenbaums. The use of the Kinks and Peter Starstedt fits perfectly whilst the slight additions of bits and bobs from Bengali musician Satyajit Rays work just adds to the atmosphere. Great Film all round.
February 25, 2017
Weird. Nice colours.
February 24, 2017
Even a potboiling Wes Anderson has enough flavour to keep you supping on what he's serving. Weary and wounded, Owen Wilson is incredibly likeable as always.
February 9, 2017
Good visuals and music, but pointless story.
The brothers did nothing after all.
½ February 6, 2017
Auuux champs elyseeees!!!
January 21, 2017
Very good. Not my favorite Anderson film but still worth a watch.
½ December 24, 2016
This is rubbish. Visuals do not make a movie. You have been warned.
December 14, 2016
Time was kind to The Darjeeling Limited, the film grows in scope and importance with the passing of the years. Wes Anderson's least funny but most detailed and meditative film features excellent performances, especially by newcomer to Wes's world Adrien Brody, a deceivingly profound narrative and, ultimately, an enlightening journey.
½ October 15, 2016
this movie willmake you feel all kinds of emotions, but in the end you will feel happy (at least i was). visually great, this story about three brothers finding themselves and reconnecting with each other is an interesting story
September 28, 2016
Watching this, didn't know who was crazier - the three brothers on screen or me for enjoying their story. Beginning to think I can watch Adrien Brody in anything and enjoy it.
½ September 26, 2016
Visually stunning, but the plot is not as good as other Wes Anderson movies, I think. The characters are brilliant, however.
August 16, 2016
Mesmo estando longe de ser o melhor trabalho do diretor, VIAGEM A DARJEELING tem todos os atributos que caracterizam o cinema de Wes Anderson e explora, de maneira peculiar, as relações fraternas neste road movie em território indiano.
August 11, 2016
its slightly pretentious but it's still a great and interesting movie
½ July 28, 2016
Having a good cast with interesting characters but nothing for them to do is a frustrating problem. Owen Wilson, Adrien Brody, and Jason Schwartzman play three brothers who drifted apart in their adult lives. After a near death, experience the oldest brother feels a need to bring his brothers together by going on an extended train excursion across India. He gets his brothers to join him, but they do so grudgingly and their tension escalates to arguments. The dynamic between the three characters is emotionally stiff and unnatural but there is some subtle humor to it. Their dysfunction and reason for straying from each other is unclear at first. Through their bickering and flashbacks, their situation slowly becomes clearer. Their Indian adventure, however, is dull and lacks direction. The journey does not directly affect the relationship between the characters in a meaningful way. Worse yet, the adventure does not lead to a fulfilling conclusion and ends abruptly. Each of the three brothers undergoes a character transition and in turn reconnects with his brothers, yet the other aspects of the story around them are a series of unsatisfying loose ends. The actors are capable and the characters have potential but it just does not know where it wants to go. Wes Anderson has a particular style but his dry characters rely on a better a story than this. Even if you do like Anderson, this is not his best effort.
½ July 25, 2016
Any location visited in any Anderson film is a surreal microcosm of reality. I have a special place for films featuring the Sub-Continent. I found his depiction honest; here the leads all have their own realities. They clash off themselves, the back drops of the train, and the scenery; in a way only this director could have brought to life.
½ July 12, 2016
No where close to as good as Rushmore, fantastic mr fox or the grand Budapest hotel. Felt like a letdown to his other work, with a few good moments though.
½ June 26, 2016
I feel like I'm slowly warming up to Wes Anderson, but he just isn't capable of making a film that blows me away.

For better or worse, The Darjeeling Limited is the same film Wes Anderson has been making for his entire career. Following three estranged brothers hoping to reunite on a spiritual journey across India, the movie deals with a lot of familiar Wes Anderson themes: aside from the aforementioned estranged siblings, a sense of melancholy and his familiar deadpan sense of humor are present. Fortunately, the characters, despite being initially unlikeable in traditional Anderson style, are well rounded and their collective arc is engaging. Ironically, it's through their misadventures that the three brothers find themselves, rather than through spiritual means: it's an admittedly clever satire of the spiritual journeys so many yearn for when visiting places like India. Owen Wilson, Adrien Brody (a first time Anderson collaborator), and Jason Schwartzman are all great, and their back-and-forths really hold the film together. Wes Anderson brings his traditional visual style as well: shots are framed with his famous sense of symmetry and whip-pan camera shots, and they're not as in-your-face and overdone as in his later works.

The Darjeeling Limited has been considered lesser Wes Anderson by many, but it's an entertaining watch with a nice story and direction. Any Wes Anderson fan (and perhaps those without knowledge of his works too) would be insane to not see it.
½ May 25, 2016
This was really enjoyable. I know I over-rate Anderson films but it's because I highly enjoy both his visual sensibility and the quirky style of humanistic humour that's pervasive in his work. I also greatly admire Adrien Brody's acting--so taken together, even though this isn't considered one of his better efforts, it was 4.5/5 or 9/10 for me.
½ April 11, 2016
Gave this one a re-watch on Blu-ray recently, have to say that I've upgraded my initial impressions by a half-point from my original 'review' below:

Watched it this afternoon because it turned up from Netflix, though I'm not even sure when I added it to the queue to be honest. I enjoyed it, though I maybe would've enjoyed it more had I been specifically in the mood for Wes Anderson's typical navel-gazing brand of quirky characters.

Naked Natalie Portman in the little short film before the feature was a welcome surprise, even though I had seen stills on the web previously.

This is a film that's grown on my quite a bit and something I'd highly recommend.
Page 1 of 955