Dil Bole Hadippa! (My Heart Goes Hooray!) Reviews

  • Nov 16, 2018

    Anurag Singh's colorful and fast-paced film Dil Bole Hadippa is a celebration of patriotism, secularism, love, equality, and most importantly cricket. After spending 10 years living in England, Rohan returns to India where he becomes tricked into playing as the captain for his father's cricket team: The India Tigers. He soon meets Veera after his and his father's car breaks down and she picks them up off the side of the road. Veera Kaur secretly joins the Indian men's cricket team disguised as a man, Veer, at an open try-out after having been denied the opportunity during her initial attempt dressed as herself. She soon finds out who her new cricket coach to be is, leading to a cascade of events culminating in the romantic dialogue that develops between Veera and Rohan. The aspects of this film that I liked most were one in the same with the ones that felt lead to the film's greatest shortcoming. The integration of song, dance, drama, subversion, and comedy into a story-line based in love for country, for love sport, and love for fellow man, results in a film that is unmistakably Bollywood. The fun, masala attitude of the movie made for an experience that lived up to what I have come to expect from Hindi cinema, while maintaining the ability to provide a moral lesson in acceptance and perseverance. However, this same hyper-dramatic affect of the characters' acting and the intense ironic tone engrained in the plot leads to the story of the love between Veera and Rohan getting lost; it is hard to take seriously in a way. While watching this film I could not help but draw comparisons between it and Yash Chopra's 2004 directorial work Veer-Zaara in that one of the film's main characters, Saamiya, is a female attorney, a far minority in India, yet she is similarly persistent in assuring that she receives an opportunity to prove herself in a public forum. Further, both women's stories end in a heroic victory against respected competitors - be it a cricket team or a fellow lawyer - that promulgates a sense of equality and feminism throughout this genre of film. Both Saamiya and Veera are desperate for success as it is inherent to their self-pride due to the integration of their passions and their identities. The two female characters face the same challenge but with differing personal obstacles. As a woman, Saamiya had to face blatant prejudice while perusing her dreams - in the jail, in the courtroom, in the office - whereas Veera was forced to abandon her name, her femininity, and her identity in order to do what she felt she was destined to do. The nature of Veera's secrecy brings to mind a point that was made by Kavita Daiya in her article "Violent Belongings." Daiya discuses the dichotomy that exists within Zaara who is displayed as a modern-feminist who then still relinquishes her free will and marries the man she was told to by her parents. This same dichotomy exists within Veera in a way. She is bold and loud and strong, yet she hides her femininity and subdues her identity, making her a subordinate to Indian society and possibly minimizing her successes. I thought it was interesting that the name of the male persona that Veera takes on is the same name as the imprisoned squadron leader from Veer-Zaara, Veer Pratap Singh. This allusion to the film pays homage not only to the evolving role of women in Indian culture and society, but also to the complex and controversial love story that exists between Veer and Zaara and Rohan and Veera respectively. Anurag Singh's colorful and fast-paced film Dil Bole Hadippa is a celebration of patriotism, secularism, love, equality, and most importantly cricket. After spending 10 years living in England, Rohan returns to India where he becomes tricked into playing as the captain for his father's cricket team: The India Tigers. He soon meets Veera after his and his father's car breaks down and she picks them up off the side of the road. Veera Kaur secretly joins the Indian men's cricket team disguised as a man, Veer, at an open try-out after having been denied the opportunity during her initial attempt dressed as herself. She soon finds out who her new cricket coach to be is, leading to a cascade of events culminating in the romantic dialogue that develops between Veera and Rohan. The aspects of this film that I liked most were one in the same with the ones that felt lead to the film's greatest shortcoming. The integration of song, dance, drama, subversion, and comedy into a story-line based in love for country, for love sport, and love for fellow man, results in a film that is unmistakably Bollywood. The fun, masala attitude of the movie made for an experience that lived up to what I have come to expect from Hindi cinema, while maintaining the ability to provide a moral lesson in acceptance and perseverance. However, this same hyper-dramatic affect of the characters' acting and the intense ironic tone engrained in the plot leads to the story of the love between Veera and Rohan getting lost; it is hard to take seriously in a way. While watching this film I could not help but draw comparisons between it and Yash Chopra's 2004 directorial work Veer-Zaara in that one of the film's main characters, Saamiya, is a female attorney, a far minority in India, yet she is similarly persistent in assuring that she receives an opportunity to prove herself in a public forum. Further, both women's stories end in a heroic victory against respected competitors - be it a cricket team or a fellow lawyer - that promulgates a sense of equality and feminism throughout this genre of film. Both Saamiya and Veera are desperate for success as it is inherent to their self-pride due to the integration of their passions and their identities. The two female characters face the same challenge but with differing personal obstacles. As a woman, Saamiya had to face blatant prejudice while perusing her dreams - in the jail, in the courtroom, in the office - whereas Veera was forced to abandon her name, her femininity, and her identity in order to do what she felt she was destined to do. The nature of Veera's secrecy brings to mind a point that was made by Kavita Daiya in her article "Violent Belongings." Daiya discuses the dichotomy that exists within Zaara who is displayed as a modern-feminist who then still relinquishes her free will and marries the man she was told to by her parents. This same dichotomy exists within Veera in a way. She is bold and loud and strong, yet she hides her femininity and subdues her identity, making her a subordinate to Indian society and possibly minimizing her successes. I thought it was interesting that the name of the male persona that Veera takes on is the same name as the imprisoned squadron leader from Veer-Zaara, Veer Pratap Singh. This allusion to the film pays homage not only to the evolving role of women in Indian culture and society, but also to the complex and controversial love story that exists between Veer and Zaara and Rohan and Veera respectively.

    Anurag Singh's colorful and fast-paced film Dil Bole Hadippa is a celebration of patriotism, secularism, love, equality, and most importantly cricket. After spending 10 years living in England, Rohan returns to India where he becomes tricked into playing as the captain for his father's cricket team: The India Tigers. He soon meets Veera after his and his father's car breaks down and she picks them up off the side of the road. Veera Kaur secretly joins the Indian men's cricket team disguised as a man, Veer, at an open try-out after having been denied the opportunity during her initial attempt dressed as herself. She soon finds out who her new cricket coach to be is, leading to a cascade of events culminating in the romantic dialogue that develops between Veera and Rohan. The aspects of this film that I liked most were one in the same with the ones that felt lead to the film's greatest shortcoming. The integration of song, dance, drama, subversion, and comedy into a story-line based in love for country, for love sport, and love for fellow man, results in a film that is unmistakably Bollywood. The fun, masala attitude of the movie made for an experience that lived up to what I have come to expect from Hindi cinema, while maintaining the ability to provide a moral lesson in acceptance and perseverance. However, this same hyper-dramatic affect of the characters' acting and the intense ironic tone engrained in the plot leads to the story of the love between Veera and Rohan getting lost; it is hard to take seriously in a way. While watching this film I could not help but draw comparisons between it and Yash Chopra's 2004 directorial work Veer-Zaara in that one of the film's main characters, Saamiya, is a female attorney, a far minority in India, yet she is similarly persistent in assuring that she receives an opportunity to prove herself in a public forum. Further, both women's stories end in a heroic victory against respected competitors - be it a cricket team or a fellow lawyer - that promulgates a sense of equality and feminism throughout this genre of film. Both Saamiya and Veera are desperate for success as it is inherent to their self-pride due to the integration of their passions and their identities. The two female characters face the same challenge but with differing personal obstacles. As a woman, Saamiya had to face blatant prejudice while perusing her dreams - in the jail, in the courtroom, in the office - whereas Veera was forced to abandon her name, her femininity, and her identity in order to do what she felt she was destined to do. The nature of Veera's secrecy brings to mind a point that was made by Kavita Daiya in her article "Violent Belongings." Daiya discuses the dichotomy that exists within Zaara who is displayed as a modern-feminist who then still relinquishes her free will and marries the man she was told to by her parents. This same dichotomy exists within Veera in a way. She is bold and loud and strong, yet she hides her femininity and subdues her identity, making her a subordinate to Indian society and possibly minimizing her successes. I thought it was interesting that the name of the male persona that Veera takes on is the same name as the imprisoned squadron leader from Veer-Zaara, Veer Pratap Singh. This allusion to the film pays homage not only to the evolving role of women in Indian culture and society, but also to the complex and controversial love story that exists between Veer and Zaara and Rohan and Veera respectively. Anurag Singh's colorful and fast-paced film Dil Bole Hadippa is a celebration of patriotism, secularism, love, equality, and most importantly cricket. After spending 10 years living in England, Rohan returns to India where he becomes tricked into playing as the captain for his father's cricket team: The India Tigers. He soon meets Veera after his and his father's car breaks down and she picks them up off the side of the road. Veera Kaur secretly joins the Indian men's cricket team disguised as a man, Veer, at an open try-out after having been denied the opportunity during her initial attempt dressed as herself. She soon finds out who her new cricket coach to be is, leading to a cascade of events culminating in the romantic dialogue that develops between Veera and Rohan. The aspects of this film that I liked most were one in the same with the ones that felt lead to the film's greatest shortcoming. The integration of song, dance, drama, subversion, and comedy into a story-line based in love for country, for love sport, and love for fellow man, results in a film that is unmistakably Bollywood. The fun, masala attitude of the movie made for an experience that lived up to what I have come to expect from Hindi cinema, while maintaining the ability to provide a moral lesson in acceptance and perseverance. However, this same hyper-dramatic affect of the characters' acting and the intense ironic tone engrained in the plot leads to the story of the love between Veera and Rohan getting lost; it is hard to take seriously in a way. While watching this film I could not help but draw comparisons between it and Yash Chopra's 2004 directorial work Veer-Zaara in that one of the film's main characters, Saamiya, is a female attorney, a far minority in India, yet she is similarly persistent in assuring that she receives an opportunity to prove herself in a public forum. Further, both women's stories end in a heroic victory against respected competitors - be it a cricket team or a fellow lawyer - that promulgates a sense of equality and feminism throughout this genre of film. Both Saamiya and Veera are desperate for success as it is inherent to their self-pride due to the integration of their passions and their identities. The two female characters face the same challenge but with differing personal obstacles. As a woman, Saamiya had to face blatant prejudice while perusing her dreams - in the jail, in the courtroom, in the office - whereas Veera was forced to abandon her name, her femininity, and her identity in order to do what she felt she was destined to do. The nature of Veera's secrecy brings to mind a point that was made by Kavita Daiya in her article "Violent Belongings." Daiya discuses the dichotomy that exists within Zaara who is displayed as a modern-feminist who then still relinquishes her free will and marries the man she was told to by her parents. This same dichotomy exists within Veera in a way. She is bold and loud and strong, yet she hides her femininity and subdues her identity, making her a subordinate to Indian society and possibly minimizing her successes. I thought it was interesting that the name of the male persona that Veera takes on is the same name as the imprisoned squadron leader from Veer-Zaara, Veer Pratap Singh. This allusion to the film pays homage not only to the evolving role of women in Indian culture and society, but also to the complex and controversial love story that exists between Veer and Zaara and Rohan and Veera respectively.

  • Nov 16, 2018

    The film Dil Bole Hadippa!, directed by Anurag Singh, follows the story of a young, talented woman with big dreams. Veera (Rani Mukerji) is the best cricket player her town has ever seen, but since she is a woman, no one takes her seriously, and she is not allowed to join the new and revamped cricket team for India. Luckily, she has some tricks up her sleeve, and disguises herself as a man named Veer Pratap Singh so she can successfully join the team and live out her dreams. Problems arise when she falls for her team captain, Rohan (Shahid Kapoor), and even more problems arise when he falls for Veera as well, but he remains oblivious to her fake identity. This fun and silly story is interwoven with beautiful and colorful costumes and sets, catchy tunes and a motif that is sure to get stuck in your head by the end of the film. Though the plot is more or less completely predictable, it's about the journey, not the destination. I normally don't enjoy sports movies, but it turns out that when they're mixed with over-the-top musical numbers with possible queer subtext, and a rousing speech about equality and the hypocrisy of the patriarchy, they can actually become enjoyable. This movie is also enjoyable for its conversation with other Bollywood films, most notably, DDLJ. I basically squealed when he busted out that mandolin on stage and played the film's main motif. To use a more proper term, this film's cinephilia, celebration of film, is a lot of what makes this movie so fun and memorable. It makes its viewer excited to be part of this long standing and important tradition. This, combined with the complete and almost ridiculous over-the-top spectacle that is vital to any Bollywood film, as described in the article "The Popular Hindi Film: Ideology and First Principles" by Ashis Nandy. This article describes the celebration of the "overstatement" and "melodrama" present in Bollywood films, which are "crucial stylizations" for the "Bombay film." Dil Bole Hadippa! is a great example of a film that is completely aware of how over the top and crazy it is, but nevertheless, it remains cohesive and enjoyable. There is something particularly satisfying about watching protagonists that explicitly claim they do not fall into the typical Bollywood tropes, only to fall into them without knowing it. This is also simultaneously displayed in the subversion of the girl-boy centric dance numbers, as this movie contains a girl-girl centered dance number and a boy-boy dance sequence. Although, technically, these can still be easily read as heterosexual within the context of the plot, if you choose to simply look at these dances as they are, it is easy to also read them as... Not That. So, even though this movie was maybe not the most meaningful I've ever seen, I still think it's a must-watch for all Bollywood lovers.

    The film Dil Bole Hadippa!, directed by Anurag Singh, follows the story of a young, talented woman with big dreams. Veera (Rani Mukerji) is the best cricket player her town has ever seen, but since she is a woman, no one takes her seriously, and she is not allowed to join the new and revamped cricket team for India. Luckily, she has some tricks up her sleeve, and disguises herself as a man named Veer Pratap Singh so she can successfully join the team and live out her dreams. Problems arise when she falls for her team captain, Rohan (Shahid Kapoor), and even more problems arise when he falls for Veera as well, but he remains oblivious to her fake identity. This fun and silly story is interwoven with beautiful and colorful costumes and sets, catchy tunes and a motif that is sure to get stuck in your head by the end of the film. Though the plot is more or less completely predictable, it's about the journey, not the destination. I normally don't enjoy sports movies, but it turns out that when they're mixed with over-the-top musical numbers with possible queer subtext, and a rousing speech about equality and the hypocrisy of the patriarchy, they can actually become enjoyable. This movie is also enjoyable for its conversation with other Bollywood films, most notably, DDLJ. I basically squealed when he busted out that mandolin on stage and played the film's main motif. To use a more proper term, this film's cinephilia, celebration of film, is a lot of what makes this movie so fun and memorable. It makes its viewer excited to be part of this long standing and important tradition. This, combined with the complete and almost ridiculous over-the-top spectacle that is vital to any Bollywood film, as described in the article "The Popular Hindi Film: Ideology and First Principles" by Ashis Nandy. This article describes the celebration of the "overstatement" and "melodrama" present in Bollywood films, which are "crucial stylizations" for the "Bombay film." Dil Bole Hadippa! is a great example of a film that is completely aware of how over the top and crazy it is, but nevertheless, it remains cohesive and enjoyable. There is something particularly satisfying about watching protagonists that explicitly claim they do not fall into the typical Bollywood tropes, only to fall into them without knowing it. This is also simultaneously displayed in the subversion of the girl-boy centric dance numbers, as this movie contains a girl-girl centered dance number and a boy-boy dance sequence. Although, technically, these can still be easily read as heterosexual within the context of the plot, if you choose to simply look at these dances as they are, it is easy to also read them as... Not That. So, even though this movie was maybe not the most meaningful I've ever seen, I still think it's a must-watch for all Bollywood lovers.

  • Nov 16, 2018

    Dil Bole Hadippa represents the pinnacle of cinephilic pleasure, successfully aligning itself with films from the deep history that Bollywood has to offer. This film's tendency to repeatedly and consistently reference its predecessors leads the audience to make valuable connections to films with completely different tonalities and, what seem to be, completely different messages. While Dil Bole Hadippa maintains the light demeanor of a comedy movie, centering around a woman who dresses as a man in order to play on the Indian cricket team, it is able to appeal to the emotions and ideas in films that are much more serious in nature. References to Amitabh Bachchan and his role as the 'angry young man' bring the audience to recall films like Deewaar that highlight issues of societal laws being at odds with justice. While in Deewaar this injustice pushes Bachchan to lead a life of crime, here it pushes the main character, Veera, to engage in jocular crossdressing. Nonetheless, the audience is brought to recognize the same dilemma in its lovable protagonist. Dil Bole Hadippa also references films like Main Hoon Na and Veer-Zaara, which are set predominantly within the context of Indo-Pakistani conflict, directing audience's attention to the concept of a cricket game between the two countries as a sign of peace. In this way, the film is able to elicit the strong emotions of it's viewers towards such a serious conflict without compromising its comedic essence. In addition, Veer-Zaara and Main Hoon Na concern themselves with issues of disbanded families and separation, which remains a subplot in the film. Blatant calls back to DDLJ serve to underscore both the love story of the film, as well as issues of the non-resident Indian. In both Dil Bole Hadippa and DDLJ, a main barrier within the love story is the westernization of the male love interest, although imposed by the lover in the former and the father of the lover in the latter. By invoking DDLJ, the audience is reminded that an Indian identity is not merely geographical, and that a love of the land may exist or develop within those from elsewhere. Finally, references to Amar, Akbar, Anthony illuminate issues of mistaken identities and the frustration involved in awaiting the payoffs of reunion. All of these links bolster the claims made by Leo Braudy in "Genre: The Conventions of Connection", where he states, "Perhaps the main difference between genre films and classic films is the way that genre films invoke past films while classic films spend time denying them ... The only test is continuing relevance, and a genre will remain vital ... so long as its conventions still express themes and conflicts that preoccupy its audience" (616). Dil Bole Hadippa drives home its connection to the films that came before it, meaning that it offers a continuation of concepts and ideas present in cinema from decades prior. Through its not-so-subtle reminders of films like those listed above, this film enhances its meaning through the highlighting of its subplots, and elicits a chuckle from the audience as well. Beyond its cinephilic qualities, Dil Bole Hadippa offers a serious statement against sexism, and seeks to question the role of the female love interest in the traditional Bollywood film. While Veera's assumption of a male identity remains one of the comedic cruxes of the film, her need to do so becomes the major disruption within its moral universe. The film ultimately argues for the capability of women in assuming positions of leadership and power, and for a greater level of equality in societal roles. In even further connection with prior films, Veera's assumption of a traditionally male role is reminiscent of the character arc of Radha in Mother India. Although completely different films in terms of their subject matter and emotional tone, both represent women inhabiting male leadership roles and an eventual acceptance and celebration of their doing so. In this sense, Dil Bole Hadippa maintains its emotional and moral core throughout its comedy. Dil Bole Hadippa is a remarkable film that remains genuinely enjoyable, all the while connecting itself to ongoing moral issues and establishing its place within the Bollywood lineage.

    Dil Bole Hadippa represents the pinnacle of cinephilic pleasure, successfully aligning itself with films from the deep history that Bollywood has to offer. This film's tendency to repeatedly and consistently reference its predecessors leads the audience to make valuable connections to films with completely different tonalities and, what seem to be, completely different messages. While Dil Bole Hadippa maintains the light demeanor of a comedy movie, centering around a woman who dresses as a man in order to play on the Indian cricket team, it is able to appeal to the emotions and ideas in films that are much more serious in nature. References to Amitabh Bachchan and his role as the 'angry young man' bring the audience to recall films like Deewaar that highlight issues of societal laws being at odds with justice. While in Deewaar this injustice pushes Bachchan to lead a life of crime, here it pushes the main character, Veera, to engage in jocular crossdressing. Nonetheless, the audience is brought to recognize the same dilemma in its lovable protagonist. Dil Bole Hadippa also references films like Main Hoon Na and Veer-Zaara, which are set predominantly within the context of Indo-Pakistani conflict, directing audience's attention to the concept of a cricket game between the two countries as a sign of peace. In this way, the film is able to elicit the strong emotions of it's viewers towards such a serious conflict without compromising its comedic essence. In addition, Veer-Zaara and Main Hoon Na concern themselves with issues of disbanded families and separation, which remains a subplot in the film. Blatant calls back to DDLJ serve to underscore both the love story of the film, as well as issues of the non-resident Indian. In both Dil Bole Hadippa and DDLJ, a main barrier within the love story is the westernization of the male love interest, although imposed by the lover in the former and the father of the lover in the latter. By invoking DDLJ, the audience is reminded that an Indian identity is not merely geographical, and that a love of the land may exist or develop within those from elsewhere. Finally, references to Amar, Akbar, Anthony illuminate issues of mistaken identities and the frustration involved in awaiting the payoffs of reunion. All of these links bolster the claims made by Leo Braudy in "Genre: The Conventions of Connection", where he states, "Perhaps the main difference between genre films and classic films is the way that genre films invoke past films while classic films spend time denying them ... The only test is continuing relevance, and a genre will remain vital ... so long as its conventions still express themes and conflicts that preoccupy its audience" (616). Dil Bole Hadippa drives home its connection to the films that came before it, meaning that it offers a continuation of concepts and ideas present in cinema from decades prior. Through its not-so-subtle reminders of films like those listed above, this film enhances its meaning through the highlighting of its subplots, and elicits a chuckle from the audience as well. Beyond its cinephilic qualities, Dil Bole Hadippa offers a serious statement against sexism, and seeks to question the role of the female love interest in the traditional Bollywood film. While Veera's assumption of a male identity remains one of the comedic cruxes of the film, her need to do so becomes the major disruption within its moral universe. The film ultimately argues for the capability of women in assuming positions of leadership and power, and for a greater level of equality in societal roles. In even further connection with prior films, Veera's assumption of a traditionally male role is reminiscent of the character arc of Radha in Mother India. Although completely different films in terms of their subject matter and emotional tone, both represent women inhabiting male leadership roles and an eventual acceptance and celebration of their doing so. In this sense, Dil Bole Hadippa maintains its emotional and moral core throughout its comedy. Dil Bole Hadippa is a remarkable film that remains genuinely enjoyable, all the while connecting itself to ongoing moral issues and establishing its place within the Bollywood lineage.

  • Jun 06, 2016

    While the idea of the movie is a copy of a Hollywood movie, Dil Bole Hadippa still lacks in a realistic or interesting story supported by average performances.

    While the idea of the movie is a copy of a Hollywood movie, Dil Bole Hadippa still lacks in a realistic or interesting story supported by average performances.

  • Feb 05, 2015

    This was a very fun movie. The cast was great, the songs were wonderful, and the love story was adorable.

    This was a very fun movie. The cast was great, the songs were wonderful, and the love story was adorable.

  • Oct 31, 2013

    Dil Bole Hadippa! (Anurag Singh, 2009) I admit it-I'm a sucker for big Bollywood productions. (Which is odd considering how much I despise most American musicals.) I'm also a very big fan of cricket and I have generally been impressed with many of the "updated Shakespeare" attempts that have come across my screen (viz. recent Coriolanus review). So what we have here is a Bollywood movie about cricket that's based loosely on Twelfth Night... it's like someone went fishing in my brain and came up with the perfect combination of stuff. Which is not to say Dil Bole Hadippa! Is the best movie in the world or anything, but for what it is, it's a barrel of fun. Plot: Veera Kaur (Veer-Zaara's Rani Mukerji) is a cricket-obsessed young woman who's sick of watching her small border town's circket squad lose to the squad of their Pakistani neighbors every year. After their eighteenth loss in a row, she goes to join up and is turned away for being a woman. Problem? Not in Bollywood, where a glamorous young lady can smack on a mustache, don a turban, and become Veer Pratap Singh, who suddenly appears out of nowhere in a small town where everyone knows everyone else, and no one questions this! (Just run with it...) Meanwhile, Vicky Singh (Bend It Like Beckham's Anupam Kehr), the squad's owner has a son, Rohan Singh (Chance Pe Dance's Shahid Kapoor), who's gone off to become an international cricket star; Vicky convinces Rohan to come back and train the squad in preparation for next year's match. So they have a trainer who knows the goods and a mysterious new star, and everything's great... until Rohan starts falling for Veera. Cue comedy of errors. There is nothing here you haven't seen before, but Singh, an associate director since the mid-nineties stepping into the big chair (this is his second film as a director), has learned his craft well; it's an engaging little movie with likable characters stuck into dumb, but funny, situations. Yes, you've got to suspend a whole lot of disbelief to get it to work, but it's a Bollywood movie-if you're not already suspending disbelief when an entire town suddenly breaks into a choreographed dance routine, you're probably watching the wrong genre. There's a fun script, a decent-if-not-yet-great director, and top-notch stars. There's singing, there's dancing, there's romance, and above all there's cricket. What more could you want? *** 1/2

    Dil Bole Hadippa! (Anurag Singh, 2009) I admit it-I'm a sucker for big Bollywood productions. (Which is odd considering how much I despise most American musicals.) I'm also a very big fan of cricket and I have generally been impressed with many of the "updated Shakespeare" attempts that have come across my screen (viz. recent Coriolanus review). So what we have here is a Bollywood movie about cricket that's based loosely on Twelfth Night... it's like someone went fishing in my brain and came up with the perfect combination of stuff. Which is not to say Dil Bole Hadippa! Is the best movie in the world or anything, but for what it is, it's a barrel of fun. Plot: Veera Kaur (Veer-Zaara's Rani Mukerji) is a cricket-obsessed young woman who's sick of watching her small border town's circket squad lose to the squad of their Pakistani neighbors every year. After their eighteenth loss in a row, she goes to join up and is turned away for being a woman. Problem? Not in Bollywood, where a glamorous young lady can smack on a mustache, don a turban, and become Veer Pratap Singh, who suddenly appears out of nowhere in a small town where everyone knows everyone else, and no one questions this! (Just run with it...) Meanwhile, Vicky Singh (Bend It Like Beckham's Anupam Kehr), the squad's owner has a son, Rohan Singh (Chance Pe Dance's Shahid Kapoor), who's gone off to become an international cricket star; Vicky convinces Rohan to come back and train the squad in preparation for next year's match. So they have a trainer who knows the goods and a mysterious new star, and everything's great... until Rohan starts falling for Veera. Cue comedy of errors. There is nothing here you haven't seen before, but Singh, an associate director since the mid-nineties stepping into the big chair (this is his second film as a director), has learned his craft well; it's an engaging little movie with likable characters stuck into dumb, but funny, situations. Yes, you've got to suspend a whole lot of disbelief to get it to work, but it's a Bollywood movie-if you're not already suspending disbelief when an entire town suddenly breaks into a choreographed dance routine, you're probably watching the wrong genre. There's a fun script, a decent-if-not-yet-great director, and top-notch stars. There's singing, there's dancing, there's romance, and above all there's cricket. What more could you want? *** 1/2

  • Feb 16, 2013

    You worship the Divine goddess in her idol form, yet in her human form you shun her. <--(or words to that effect) If you like Bollywood movies in general, or even if you've only seen and enjoyed a few ( Bride and Prejudice, Slum dog millionaire, etc), then this should be among those to give a try. Set predominantly in Hindustan (India) and revolving around a traditional, yearly cricket match between India and Pakistan for the Aman (Peace) cup, the story follows Veera, a Punjab girl, who hopes one day to be the #1 cricketer, only problem is, she's a woman (and there are no female cricket teams) and so enters Veer. This isn't just a Bollywood song and dance romance, albeit the song and dance numbers are infectious in their rhythm and movement (and made me anyway, wanna get up and dance), and the romance lends to the over coming of differences. As light and funny and VERY COLOURFUL, as it is at times, at its heart is a warming story of a girl, her identity, a dream, love of country and two nations!

    You worship the Divine goddess in her idol form, yet in her human form you shun her. <--(or words to that effect) If you like Bollywood movies in general, or even if you've only seen and enjoyed a few ( Bride and Prejudice, Slum dog millionaire, etc), then this should be among those to give a try. Set predominantly in Hindustan (India) and revolving around a traditional, yearly cricket match between India and Pakistan for the Aman (Peace) cup, the story follows Veera, a Punjab girl, who hopes one day to be the #1 cricketer, only problem is, she's a woman (and there are no female cricket teams) and so enters Veer. This isn't just a Bollywood song and dance romance, albeit the song and dance numbers are infectious in their rhythm and movement (and made me anyway, wanna get up and dance), and the romance lends to the over coming of differences. As light and funny and VERY COLOURFUL, as it is at times, at its heart is a warming story of a girl, her identity, a dream, love of country and two nations!

  • Oct 29, 2012

    The only thing that kept me going was seeing Shahid's face cause man Rani Mukherjee was so annoying in this. It was a decent movie. I think it's definitely worth watch with a friend.

    The only thing that kept me going was seeing Shahid's face cause man Rani Mukherjee was so annoying in this. It was a decent movie. I think it's definitely worth watch with a friend.

  • Jul 09, 2012

    What I consider to be my first exposure to Bollywood. There's this spunky Indian female cricket phenomenon (Rani Mukerji) who is well aware how poorly her country has been playing. Under the guise of a man, she joins the team, only to find herself becoming romantically involved with the handsome captain of the team (Shahid Kapoor) when she is dressed as a woman. I have seen My Name is Khan, but I don't really consider that to be true Bollywood, as it is in English and takes place in the States. The biggest thing I noticed right away is how manipulative the score is; it's always on in the background, always telling you how to feel, and changes on a dime to fit the script. It's not a huge problem, though, and the music during any one of the dance sequences that they burst into on a whim is downright infectious. It does very much feel like you're watching a non-Western style film, and I don't think everything translates. For one thing, I don't for the life of me understand the rules of Cricket; even when the big finale is inevitably reached, I still had questions on the mechanics of the game, and I had been watching nearly two hours of the sport. I had to just go with it like it was like baseball movie, because they share a lot of similar tropes. Apparently, most Bollywood movies are an hour or two longer than Hollywood movies, and it may just be that I am not accustomed to Indian sensibilities, but I think that two and a half hours is an ungodly runtime for what is essentially a romantic comedy. It is never boring, though, because everything is so colorful and emotions are bigger, but you know how this is going to play out, and this story could have been told so much more tightly. This was pretty fun for me, and I know that I must continue to adjust if I want to further explore this genre.

    What I consider to be my first exposure to Bollywood. There's this spunky Indian female cricket phenomenon (Rani Mukerji) who is well aware how poorly her country has been playing. Under the guise of a man, she joins the team, only to find herself becoming romantically involved with the handsome captain of the team (Shahid Kapoor) when she is dressed as a woman. I have seen My Name is Khan, but I don't really consider that to be true Bollywood, as it is in English and takes place in the States. The biggest thing I noticed right away is how manipulative the score is; it's always on in the background, always telling you how to feel, and changes on a dime to fit the script. It's not a huge problem, though, and the music during any one of the dance sequences that they burst into on a whim is downright infectious. It does very much feel like you're watching a non-Western style film, and I don't think everything translates. For one thing, I don't for the life of me understand the rules of Cricket; even when the big finale is inevitably reached, I still had questions on the mechanics of the game, and I had been watching nearly two hours of the sport. I had to just go with it like it was like baseball movie, because they share a lot of similar tropes. Apparently, most Bollywood movies are an hour or two longer than Hollywood movies, and it may just be that I am not accustomed to Indian sensibilities, but I think that two and a half hours is an ungodly runtime for what is essentially a romantic comedy. It is never boring, though, because everything is so colorful and emotions are bigger, but you know how this is going to play out, and this story could have been told so much more tightly. This was pretty fun for me, and I know that I must continue to adjust if I want to further explore this genre.

  • Jun 18, 2012

    This is a Wonderfully funny film with a great story line and a wonderful heroin

    This is a Wonderfully funny film with a great story line and a wonderful heroin