Escape from Extinction Reviews

  • Nov 12, 2020

    I am posting this for my friend, Betsy Burkhardt I recently saw the movie, Escape from Extinction, twice within one week.  As a whole-hearted animal-lover, the movie was both invigorating and sobering at the same time.  One of the main focal points is educating the public, who are often misinformed about zoos and aquariums, with the belief that the animals are just at the zoos/aquariums and are held there in captivity, so that we humans can gawk at them.  The movie offers information on how current zoos and aquariums are essential for the rescue and rehabilitation of animals that are on the verge of extinction.  These are accredited institutions that rescue animals and clean the oil off of animals after huge ocean oil spills/people who take in infant polar bears, elephants, and rhinos, who are starving to death because their mother has been shot to death.  Giving these animals food and connection to social skills.  These are just a few examples of how accredited zoos have dramatically kept many species from going extinct.   I lived in Zambia for three years and was fortunate to go to the Lilayi Elephant Nursery, just outside of Lusaka, the Capitol.  Here, orphaned elephants are relocated from where poachers have killed their mother,  in order to saw off her tusks.  These baby elephants are often starving and in need milk as well as social interaction.  It is an amazing place, one set up by the African Elephant Orphanage Project, (EOP).  Of note is that each baby elephant has it's own human who acts as a parent to the baby elephant…..feeding it milk from a bottle, stroking it, going on walks with the other orphaned elephants.  Also, these caretakers sleep above their chosen baby elephant.  When ready, the elephants are returned to the wild.   From the movie, I learned a lot about "keystone species".  These animals, like the grey wolf in Yellowstone National Park, are essential species to their ecosystem because the ecosystem largely depends on it such that if that particular keystone species is removed, the whole ecosystem, including plants, will change dramatically.  The grey wolf once had a huge population when Yellowstone was established in 1872.  Sadly, with the migration of people from the East to the West Coast, many grey wolves were shot to death.   Grey wolf packs were often seen in abundance in the 1800s.  Sadly, by 1926, the last wolf pack in Yellowstone, was killed off.  With a lot of work and determination, accredited zoos were able to breed the few remaining grey wolves who lived in the other 48 states, and were able to restore a population of grey wolves to Yellowstone.   We humans have created a horrendous global environment.  Plastic kills animals daily, global warming has contributed to huge fires, like the current ones in California and Australia, killing thousands of animals.  Illegal trade of animals still continues.  Poachers in Africa and elsewhere are still abundant and endangered animals, like the black rhino that lives in Zambia, have had to have their horns sawed off and have park rangers, equipped with guns,  follow the rhinos daily to make sure they remain safe from poachers.   Lastly, most people are aware of the movie "Freeing Willy".  People protested against aquariums, and they wanted Keiko (the real name of the whale), to be returned to the ocean and then he would no longer live in the confining aquarium at  Sea World.  Sadly, Keiko who had lived all of his adult life at Sea World, could not be taught to live in the wild.  Confining a wild killer whale will take away all of the whale's instincts on how to live in the wild.  Keiko could not fend for himself and would swim up to boats asking to be fed and rubbed.  Keiko ended up dying.  It turns out that trying to recreate these natural instincts for Keiko can only be taught by "nature" from the start, when they are born and are raised by their pod.  Escape from Extinction is an extraordinarily good movie. I highly recommend seeing it. Betsy Burkhardt

    I am posting this for my friend, Betsy Burkhardt I recently saw the movie, Escape from Extinction, twice within one week.  As a whole-hearted animal-lover, the movie was both invigorating and sobering at the same time.  One of the main focal points is educating the public, who are often misinformed about zoos and aquariums, with the belief that the animals are just at the zoos/aquariums and are held there in captivity, so that we humans can gawk at them.  The movie offers information on how current zoos and aquariums are essential for the rescue and rehabilitation of animals that are on the verge of extinction.  These are accredited institutions that rescue animals and clean the oil off of animals after huge ocean oil spills/people who take in infant polar bears, elephants, and rhinos, who are starving to death because their mother has been shot to death.  Giving these animals food and connection to social skills.  These are just a few examples of how accredited zoos have dramatically kept many species from going extinct.   I lived in Zambia for three years and was fortunate to go to the Lilayi Elephant Nursery, just outside of Lusaka, the Capitol.  Here, orphaned elephants are relocated from where poachers have killed their mother,  in order to saw off her tusks.  These baby elephants are often starving and in need milk as well as social interaction.  It is an amazing place, one set up by the African Elephant Orphanage Project, (EOP).  Of note is that each baby elephant has it's own human who acts as a parent to the baby elephant…..feeding it milk from a bottle, stroking it, going on walks with the other orphaned elephants.  Also, these caretakers sleep above their chosen baby elephant.  When ready, the elephants are returned to the wild.   From the movie, I learned a lot about "keystone species".  These animals, like the grey wolf in Yellowstone National Park, are essential species to their ecosystem because the ecosystem largely depends on it such that if that particular keystone species is removed, the whole ecosystem, including plants, will change dramatically.  The grey wolf once had a huge population when Yellowstone was established in 1872.  Sadly, with the migration of people from the East to the West Coast, many grey wolves were shot to death.   Grey wolf packs were often seen in abundance in the 1800s.  Sadly, by 1926, the last wolf pack in Yellowstone, was killed off.  With a lot of work and determination, accredited zoos were able to breed the few remaining grey wolves who lived in the other 48 states, and were able to restore a population of grey wolves to Yellowstone.   We humans have created a horrendous global environment.  Plastic kills animals daily, global warming has contributed to huge fires, like the current ones in California and Australia, killing thousands of animals.  Illegal trade of animals still continues.  Poachers in Africa and elsewhere are still abundant and endangered animals, like the black rhino that lives in Zambia, have had to have their horns sawed off and have park rangers, equipped with guns,  follow the rhinos daily to make sure they remain safe from poachers.   Lastly, most people are aware of the movie "Freeing Willy".  People protested against aquariums, and they wanted Keiko (the real name of the whale), to be returned to the ocean and then he would no longer live in the confining aquarium at  Sea World.  Sadly, Keiko who had lived all of his adult life at Sea World, could not be taught to live in the wild.  Confining a wild killer whale will take away all of the whale's instincts on how to live in the wild.  Keiko could not fend for himself and would swim up to boats asking to be fed and rubbed.  Keiko ended up dying.  It turns out that trying to recreate these natural instincts for Keiko can only be taught by "nature" from the start, when they are born and are raised by their pod.  Escape from Extinction is an extraordinarily good movie. I highly recommend seeing it. Betsy Burkhardt

  • ECB
    Nov 09, 2020

    This show was so moving. The photography was amazing. The job that accredited Zoos are doing to help animals and to prevent extinction is something I was not fully aware of. A Wonderful educational 90 minutes. This is a great show for the family, I am coming back with my grandkids.

    This show was so moving. The photography was amazing. The job that accredited Zoos are doing to help animals and to prevent extinction is something I was not fully aware of. A Wonderful educational 90 minutes. This is a great show for the family, I am coming back with my grandkids.

  • michael
    Nov 09, 2020

    Very interesting, educational and informative.Excellent narration with great photography. Understanding the issues that has caused extinction with so many species and having viewers see what accredited zoos are actually doing to preserve wildlife for the future is outstanding. Very well done documentary.

    Very interesting, educational and informative.Excellent narration with great photography. Understanding the issues that has caused extinction with so many species and having viewers see what accredited zoos are actually doing to preserve wildlife for the future is outstanding. Very well done documentary.

  • Lesley
    Nov 03, 2020

    The movie was educational and entertaining. This is a must see for children to learn more about extinction, I learned so much as an adult. It was truly enlightening. I havent walked away from a movie and thought about it after like I have a ton this one in a long time.

    The movie was educational and entertaining. This is a must see for children to learn more about extinction, I learned so much as an adult. It was truly enlightening. I havent walked away from a movie and thought about it after like I have a ton this one in a long time.

  • Ismael
    Nov 03, 2020

    Excellent story that portrays the valuable role of certified zoos to conserve wild animals.

    Excellent story that portrays the valuable role of certified zoos to conserve wild animals.

  • Oct 30, 2020

    If you want a better understanding of your environment, or how all the pieces fit together in this world, THIS IS IT! Very well presented. From the role of plankton, global warming, natural disasters and pollution. To the release of the killer whale that starred in 'Free Willy'. Mankind needs to take aggressive action to promote the healing of the ecosystem! It truly is not an option. It is crucial for animal survival and the survival of man. This movie is an excellent source to understand how these connections all depend upon one another. Let each of us work on making a better tomorrow for the generations to come for 💛. ✌️!

    If you want a better understanding of your environment, or how all the pieces fit together in this world, THIS IS IT! Very well presented. From the role of plankton, global warming, natural disasters and pollution. To the release of the killer whale that starred in 'Free Willy'. Mankind needs to take aggressive action to promote the healing of the ecosystem! It truly is not an option. It is crucial for animal survival and the survival of man. This movie is an excellent source to understand how these connections all depend upon one another. Let each of us work on making a better tomorrow for the generations to come for 💛. ✌️!

  • Joan
    Oct 30, 2020

    This is an amazing film offering both the history and current condition of our animal planet. Showcased are efforts around the world to preserve and bring back species that are on the brink of extinction. A must see film.

    This is an amazing film offering both the history and current condition of our animal planet. Showcased are efforts around the world to preserve and bring back species that are on the brink of extinction. A must see film.

  • Facebook U
    Oct 28, 2020

    Definitely recommend this movie! Very educational and fun to watch. My kids loved it and the movie left them excited to learn more about the animals. Showed us a lot more than we thought we knew and we loved it!!

    Definitely recommend this movie! Very educational and fun to watch. My kids loved it and the movie left them excited to learn more about the animals. Showed us a lot more than we thought we knew and we loved it!!

  • Cheyenne Wazlawik
    Oct 28, 2020

    This movie is so touching and informational. It explains the impact that humans are having on our ecosystem. Just the option of having such a informational resource is huge. We dont know what we dont know! Seeing this movie will hopefully help you make healthier choices for our animals and our earth. Which as a result will make you feel better as a human being. Definitely worth it!

    This movie is so touching and informational. It explains the impact that humans are having on our ecosystem. Just the option of having such a informational resource is huge. We dont know what we dont know! Seeing this movie will hopefully help you make healthier choices for our animals and our earth. Which as a result will make you feel better as a human being. Definitely worth it!

  • @Raceready_welding
    Oct 28, 2020

    If you were moved even a little by the film Blackfish you should absolutely watch this docufilm. Escape from extinction, is as informative as it is beautiful. Eye and mind opener, I hope everyone in the world takes the time to watch this film.

    If you were moved even a little by the film Blackfish you should absolutely watch this docufilm. Escape from extinction, is as informative as it is beautiful. Eye and mind opener, I hope everyone in the world takes the time to watch this film.