Exotica Reviews

  • Jul 31, 2020

    A dark strip joint with a silky but sinister sounding DJ sets the tone for a cast of interrelated characters each with their own demons. Egoyan does a masterful of weaving their individual threads into a dark tapestry by the end. Johnny C. sez your patience will be rewarded.

    A dark strip joint with a silky but sinister sounding DJ sets the tone for a cast of interrelated characters each with their own demons. Egoyan does a masterful of weaving their individual threads into a dark tapestry by the end. Johnny C. sez your patience will be rewarded.

  • May 27, 2020

    Genuine. Exotic, erotic and hypnotic music.

    Genuine. Exotic, erotic and hypnotic music.

  • Apr 14, 2020

    One of those few movies that makes it's overall narrative the primary focus while also being visually appealing. Atom Egoyan's first commercially successful film is tragic, harrowing, mysterious and extraordinarily framed.

    One of those few movies that makes it's overall narrative the primary focus while also being visually appealing. Atom Egoyan's first commercially successful film is tragic, harrowing, mysterious and extraordinarily framed.

  • Mar 24, 2020

    Mia Kirshner and Bruce Greenwood are excellent. I didn't really love this kind of material though. Should have been more thrilling and enticing. The narrative wasn't really focused enough. These actors are shining but the movie itself didn't feel justified being told this way.

    Mia Kirshner and Bruce Greenwood are excellent. I didn't really love this kind of material though. Should have been more thrilling and enticing. The narrative wasn't really focused enough. These actors are shining but the movie itself didn't feel justified being told this way.

  • Jan 14, 2020

    "Just because they're exotic doesn't mean they can't endure extremes. But it is after all a jungle out there, isn't it?" Exotica opens to a backdrop of exotic plants slowly panning across a wall. Lime-green credits emboldened on screen like the blood of these plants. In the word "Exotica" there's a feeling of eroticism lingering in its pronunciation. The term itself being erotic. It's through this exploration of alliteration that Egoyan alludes to the erotic nature of the film. He connects each character through exotic themes, each of them with their own story. The titular strip club, Exotica, the most obvious example. It's through this immediate connection that Atom Egoyan begins to subvert our expectations. Our perversities are implored through the opening scene, where we first meet our characters. Christina performs her schoolgirl routine to Canadian legend Leonard Cohen's Everybody Knows, while Eric, the DJ, makes his voyeuristic narration. Francis is introduced to exotic themes through the club, but also through his black wife. His wife is never given a name in the film, and her race is explored before she is ever identified. I feel this is Egoyan making another connection to the exotic subversions he has implemented into his film. It's through his wife, and his daughter, that Francis is forced to endure the extremes of his life. Exotic themes are used to impose an idea of sexual fantasy, but later used to represent the traumas in these characters lives. Christina and Eric are introduced to these themes through the strip club. Eric, with a tropical bird perched in every frame, and Christina with her legendary strip tease performance. Her trauma being exposed front and center, but revealed as a fantasy, yet again. Eric, narrating voyeuristically, exposes himself to the viewer as well, using Christina and Francis to soothe his own traumas. Thomas is the most distant character from the others, but he opens the film, as he stands there under scrutiny at the airport, hiding the exotic eggs he is smuggling. He is tied in again to our central theme of exoticness. He operates an exotic pet shop, his fear and paranoia of his smuggling operation tie in directly with his homosexuality. Thomas' trauma lies within his isolation and loneliness. His traumas and coping mechanisms are shown through repetition as well, when he continues to pay for the tickets of attractive men outside the theater. He is confronted with homosexuality and the smuggling operation in the same scene, as the man he has sex with is the same man who visually inpsects him at the airport for illegal activity. In that same scene, his eggs are stolen and his traumas exposed. Perhaps the most minor major character of the film, Zoe, makes her introduction during Leonard Cohen's smoldering song. Her exotic nature expressed through her pregnancy, as well as her sexuality towards Christina. Herself, eventually exposed like the others. The loss of her mother posing as the detrimental trauma in her life. Instead of selling the club, she keeps it, reliving her mother's routine in an attempt to find resolve in her death. Again, Atom Egoyan uses repetition to impose these ideas, initially showing them as fantasy, and peeling back another layer with each re-enactment of their healing process. All of these characters are forced to face their traumas under the same circumstances, at the Exotica strip club. With even Zoe unable to take her own advice as she says to Francis, "But you have to understand that Exotica is here for your amusement. We're here to entertain, not to heal."

    "Just because they're exotic doesn't mean they can't endure extremes. But it is after all a jungle out there, isn't it?" Exotica opens to a backdrop of exotic plants slowly panning across a wall. Lime-green credits emboldened on screen like the blood of these plants. In the word "Exotica" there's a feeling of eroticism lingering in its pronunciation. The term itself being erotic. It's through this exploration of alliteration that Egoyan alludes to the erotic nature of the film. He connects each character through exotic themes, each of them with their own story. The titular strip club, Exotica, the most obvious example. It's through this immediate connection that Atom Egoyan begins to subvert our expectations. Our perversities are implored through the opening scene, where we first meet our characters. Christina performs her schoolgirl routine to Canadian legend Leonard Cohen's Everybody Knows, while Eric, the DJ, makes his voyeuristic narration. Francis is introduced to exotic themes through the club, but also through his black wife. His wife is never given a name in the film, and her race is explored before she is ever identified. I feel this is Egoyan making another connection to the exotic subversions he has implemented into his film. It's through his wife, and his daughter, that Francis is forced to endure the extremes of his life. Exotic themes are used to impose an idea of sexual fantasy, but later used to represent the traumas in these characters lives. Christina and Eric are introduced to these themes through the strip club. Eric, with a tropical bird perched in every frame, and Christina with her legendary strip tease performance. Her trauma being exposed front and center, but revealed as a fantasy, yet again. Eric, narrating voyeuristically, exposes himself to the viewer as well, using Christina and Francis to soothe his own traumas. Thomas is the most distant character from the others, but he opens the film, as he stands there under scrutiny at the airport, hiding the exotic eggs he is smuggling. He is tied in again to our central theme of exoticness. He operates an exotic pet shop, his fear and paranoia of his smuggling operation tie in directly with his homosexuality. Thomas' trauma lies within his isolation and loneliness. His traumas and coping mechanisms are shown through repetition as well, when he continues to pay for the tickets of attractive men outside the theater. He is confronted with homosexuality and the smuggling operation in the same scene, as the man he has sex with is the same man who visually inpsects him at the airport for illegal activity. In that same scene, his eggs are stolen and his traumas exposed. Perhaps the most minor major character of the film, Zoe, makes her introduction during Leonard Cohen's smoldering song. Her exotic nature expressed through her pregnancy, as well as her sexuality towards Christina. Herself, eventually exposed like the others. The loss of her mother posing as the detrimental trauma in her life. Instead of selling the club, she keeps it, reliving her mother's routine in an attempt to find resolve in her death. Again, Atom Egoyan uses repetition to impose these ideas, initially showing them as fantasy, and peeling back another layer with each re-enactment of their healing process. All of these characters are forced to face their traumas under the same circumstances, at the Exotica strip club. With even Zoe unable to take her own advice as she says to Francis, "But you have to understand that Exotica is here for your amusement. We're here to entertain, not to heal."

  • Nov 16, 2019

    Zayıf hikaye sıkıcı tekrarlar kötü bir film.Müzikler iyiydi.

    Zayıf hikaye sıkıcı tekrarlar kötü bir film.Müzikler iyiydi.

  • Feb 15, 2018

    A bit overrated, but it gets more interesting towards the end

    A bit overrated, but it gets more interesting towards the end

  • Feb 04, 2018

    While there's nothing extraordinary about this movie, the steamy atmosphere of the strip club coupled with nuanced character study do their job. The soundtrack featuring Leonard Cohen's "Everybody Knows" adds to the flavor of the movie.

    While there's nothing extraordinary about this movie, the steamy atmosphere of the strip club coupled with nuanced character study do their job. The soundtrack featuring Leonard Cohen's "Everybody Knows" adds to the flavor of the movie.

  • Oct 15, 2017

    Great Canadian film starring the stunning Mia Kirshner!

    Great Canadian film starring the stunning Mia Kirshner!

  • Jul 10, 2017

    Excellently compelling, alluring, and original, I only wish I had found the ending a bit more satisfying.

    Excellently compelling, alluring, and original, I only wish I had found the ending a bit more satisfying.